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Discussion Starter #1
I know the physical difference between a planer and jointer. But aside from the width limitations of a jointer, couldn't the planer function for either purpose?
 

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where's my table saw?
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use a planer sled to surface one side

A jointer is used to flatten and straighten one side, from the bottom. Then with a straight and flat bottom, a planer is used to uniformly thickness the board from the top. A sled will maintain the board in a constant position while the planer removes material from the top. Once the top is straight and flat, remove the sled, turn it over and run it through normally to uniformly thickness it.
There are many variations of sleds, here's one:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/workshop/video/a-planer-sled-for-milling-lumber.aspx
 

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If you know the physical differences then you should be aware of the challenges of trying to edge joint in a planer.

A planer is not designed to support a board on its edge to be at 90 deg. In addition planers all have a height constraint.

A jointer has a fence to support a board on its edge at 90 deg, or any other angle and does not have a height constraint per se. Taller boards do take more effort to hold against the fence.

I have made a special jig for my planer to hold a piece so I can edge joint. My planer has a maximum height of about 6in.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Dave Paine said:
If you know the physical differences then you should be aware of the challenges of trying to edge joint in a planer.

A planer is not designed to support a board on its edge to be at 90 deg. In addition planers all have a height constraint.

A jointer has a fence to support a board on its edge at 90 deg, or any other angle and does not have a height constraint per se. Taller boards do take more effort to hold against the fence.

I have made a special jig for my planer to hold a piece so I can edge joint. My planer has a maximum height of about 6in.
Makes perfect sense. Thanks.
 

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I have made a special jig for my planer to hold a piece so I can edge joint.
Curious - I would think that, if not using a jointer to flatten edges, then using a sled on a table saw would be the simplest alternative.

What made you choose to edge joint in a planer? Can you post a pic of your setup? Thanks.
 

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Curious - I would think that, if not using a jointer to flatten edges, then using a sled on a table saw would be the simplest alternative.

What made you choose to edge joint in a planer? Can you post a pic of your setup? Thanks.
These days I use my table saw.

I am not presently recalling why I used the planer. It would have been for a particular operation on a project.

The jig was two 90 deg brackets clamped to infeed/outfeed tables with a step cut out in the middle to allow room for the planer head. Space between the brackets was the thickness of the board.

If I recall the step was about 3in, well within the height of the planer.

If I can recall why I felt the need to make the jig I will update the reply.

I made the jig when I was using my Delta 22-580 planer. I replaced this with a DeWalt 735 about 3 years ago.
 
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