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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm slowly building out my tool collection and my next purchase is a planer. I found a used King Industrial 20" planer for $700. As someone who is just starting out, it is more planer than I currently need but with a little negotiation I should be able to get it for almost the same price as a good portable. The planer is a King CT-508. It's been gently used but it hasn't been used at all for the past 7-8 years. Any thoughts/ comments on this planer? Thanks for your help.

P.S. I scored a used Sawstop 5hp in like new condition for a great price. Again, more than I currently need but woohoo!

Mike
 

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King Tools of Canada?

http://www.kingcanada.com/Products.htm?CD=111

Probably a great tool based on reports from others...Kenbo here.
You are on a roll with "bigger and better than you need right now" so stay on it! :thumbsup:
 

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Keep in mind, most large planers like that use metal feed rollers, causing you to have to take a much larger pass off each time.....portables use a rubber feed roller.


Now if you want to pass that sawstop on my way....i'll give you a planer...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Ryan. I'm not sure that I understand why metal rollers force you to take more off on each pass. That is certainly something for me to consider. Is it possible or even desirable to swap the metal rollers for rubber ones? I'm guessing that the upside of metal rollers is that they don't wear out. I've never owned or used a planer before (I have a good set of hand planes) so this is all new to me. I am concerned that I'm buying too much planer. On the other hand, I did manage to negotiate the price down to $500. This is the 5hp model.
 

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Thanks Ryan. I'm not sure that I understand why metal rollers force you to take more off on each pass. That is certainly something for me to consider. Is it possible or even desirable to swap the metal rollers for rubber ones? I'm guessing that the upside of metal rollers is that they don't wear out. I've never owned or used a planer before (I have a good set of hand planes) so this is all new to me. I am concerned that I'm buying too much planer. On the other hand, I did manage to negotiate the price down to $500. This is the 5hp model.

You NEED that sort of HP with 20 inch blades in my experience...

With softer woods the feed rollers WILL leave indentations when taking a small cut (moreso depending on the machine and how it is adjusted)


For the price you are paying for that - I would be wanting to see it run FIRST... Something does not 'smell' right about that.

If it 'sounds like too good of a deal' - It might not be so good of a deal...
 

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Metal feed rollers often have "teeth" which leave marks in the wood if you don't take a big enough cut. Still....if its in good shape that's a goo deal. But I'd want to see I working first.
 

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YEP, it's a monster

Thanks Ryan. I'm not sure that I understand why metal rollers force you to take more off on each pass. That is certainly something for me to consider. Is it possible or even desirable to swap the metal rollers for rubber ones? I'm guessing that the upside of metal rollers is that they don't wear out. I've never owned or used a planer before (I have a good set of hand planes) so this is all new to me. I am concerned that I'm buying too much planer. On the other hand, I did manage to negotiate the price down to $500. This is the 5hp model.

BUT, that's a great price. That size planer is found in a small lumber mills or cabinet/furniture shop for milling large planks or wider stock. That's not to say you shouldn't get it. You can always pick up a rubber roller benchtop for a few hundred as a "finish" planer for thinner stock. I have a Ryobi I got for $200.00 on sale. I've also got the Grizzly 20", a Jet 15" and a Belsaw 13"... :blink: Each serves a different purpose.

The metal feed and compression rollers leave very slight indentations which can be sanded out later. Not to worry.

Get the dang thing and start throwing some chips! :yes:
BTW, With a proper sled it can be used as a jointer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks. I had no idea it could be used as a jointer. How would I go about setting that up? I do have a 6" Rockwell jointer that I picked up at a great price. I haven't used it yet.
 

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you need a sled

Thanks. I had no idea it could be used as a jointer. How would I go about setting that up? I do have a 6" Rockwell jointer that I picked up at a great price. I haven't used it yet.
A sled is needed to support a twisted board so the cutter above the board on the planer will remove enough material to flatten the entire top of the board.
A jointer has the cutter protruding from the tables and you run the board on top of the cutter until it's completely flat on the bottom.

You can support the board with a frame and wedges like this:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/planer-sled-rails-14940/

see post 20:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/6-jointer-12-wide-board-48170/

There is a more elaborate sled on You Tube somewhere... :blink:
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks! One last question. I might be able to pick up a Woodmaster instead. Which would you choose, the 20" planer or a Woodmaster with a lot of e accessories? I guess this is a single purpose setup versus a multi-purpose tools setup question.
 

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great dilemma!

The Woodmaster is definitely more versatile. What's the width of it?
I believe it would have rubber feed rollers, like a Foley Belsaw. Check that out. I have a F-B and use it all the time. It gives a great surface and no roller marks.

The 20" Grizzly would be a real workhorse, but not as versatile.For the same price I think I'd get the W-M.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It is the 25" 7.5 hp model. The price is 3 times the cost of the GI 20" planer but it does come with a spare set of new knives and many other extras.
 

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now that's a problem...

Probably still go with the Woodmaster, but unless you envision making a lot of your own moldings, there is no real advantage.
A workhorse planer vs a planer with molding capabilities.... you may not use. OK, I'm back on the Grizzly, I happen to have one of those also. I haven't used it, still new out of the box and tucked away in the shop. :thumbdown:
 

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A sled is needed to support a twisted board so the cutter above the board on the planer will remove enough material to flatten the entire top of the board.
A jointer has the cutter protruding from the tables and you run the board on top of the cutter until it's completely flat on the bottom.

You can support the board with a frame and wedges like this:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/planer-sled-rails-14940/

see post 20:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/6-jointer-12-wide-board-48170/

There is a more elaborate sled on You Tube somewhere... :blink:

THAT was pretty darn amazing to say the least. :thumbsup:

If there was a contest and they were giving out awards for ingenuity and problem SOLVING abilities - You would never be allowed to enter the contest because it would be 'unfair' to others... :no:

Seems like every time I click one of your links I learn something new.

Thanks! :thumbsup:
 

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Lol

It's great to have a one member fan club on here.... :laughing:
 

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It's great to have a one member fan club on here.... :laughing:

BS...

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THAT is just how many times people have 'thanked' you for your advice or tips by clicking a 'button'...

I GUARANTEE you that you have helped a hell of a lot more people than that on this site with your tips and advice...

Not everybody 'clicks' the button to show appreciation. Does not really matter as your work speaks for itself... :thumbsup:



You are 'educating' a LOT more people here than you care to consider. You just don't realize it. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the input. I decided to go with the 20" planer. I would probably end up using the Woodmaster for planing 99% of the time so I don't think it's versatility is a selling feature for me.

One last last question. Will I have a tough time changing the knives on the planer if it does not come with the jigs for changing the knives? (Assuming you need jigs of course)
 

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If you are leaving infeed roller marks in your planed surface you don't have your planer set up right.

I can remove under a 1/16" with my 24" Yates American planer without any indeed roller marks. I can also hog a 1/4" in one pass too.

We have a 20" Northwood that we use and I 'adjusted' it myself. The BEST I can get out of it is 1/32 before I start seeing marks on soft wood...

It would crap in a BIG way if trying to hog 1/4 inch of material in one pass on a max width board... It would bog down and trip a breaker in a heartbeat trying to do that...

I planed down about 500 BDFT of Spanish Cedar today from 13/16 to 3/4 in two passes of 1/32nd each with no pressure marks. That was the BEST that particular machine could do with steel rollers and that was pushing its limit.

You might have a better machine OR better blades OR be better skilled at 'adjusting' your machine... :smile:

I am just guessing here that your machine did NOT come from 'china' like ours did and that you are VERY skilled at adjusting your tools... :smile:

I have already had to replace ALL of the gib screws on our machine and retap the holes they go into because of the 'china' quality going on there... At some point I hope to replace the blades with some that come from japan and are properly hardened and treated... I am sure the bearings in our machine are china garbage as well and at some point THEY will 'need' to be replaced with some 'proper' bearings...

The point I am trying to make here is that you can only do so much with 'china' quality tools before you come to the limit.
 
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