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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I'm a power took guy, but can see the benefit of having some good hand tools too. So as I find them I'm looking to rebuild a plane collection. First one I'm working on is a bailey #6. Problem is....,I don't know how to put this together or If I even have all the parts....
Also....can anyone put a date to this???
 

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For future use, this is one of a number of decent Stanley plane dating sites, this one by Patrick Leach. Not the most accurate, but one of the easiest to use.

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/dating_flowchart.php#Type%2018

Your plane looks like a Type 13 according to this site.

Sad to say the screw in the toe of the tote (rear handle) is obviously not original. They may have tried to jam present hardware into a thread intended for BS Whitworth.

Scroll down on this web page and you will see the thread specifications. This is for the old Record company, but they followed the Stanley specifications.

Number 6 is the toe screw 7/32in dia x 20 tpi Whitworth. This was very common at the time Stanley decided on the technical details of their planes, but not common these days.

If you are very lucky, the force-fit hardware has not damaged the original thread. Even harder to find a Whitworth tap these days.

If you are lucky, you can use original toe screw, from another plane. If you are not lucky, you have to use whatever the last owner used to force-fit something into the toe screw hole.

http://www.recordhandplanes.com/parts-and-sizes.html

The plane was originally assembled somewhat correctly, other than the bad toe screw.

The Record link above gives a good illustration on how the parts fit together.

Many restoration threads in this forum. Some are mine, some are by others. Worthwhile taking a look.

So what questions/issues do you still have?

Edit.

Reviewing the pictures, I am wondering if the previous owner also force-fitted hardware for the knob and tote main screw. Looking at the picture, the top of the hardware looks wrong. I cannot tell if this has damaged the original threads or not.

Sorry to advise, you may have more screws needing to be replaced than you expected.
 

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It looks to me like someone forced a square nut into the hole in the knob, and turned it down onto a threaded rod. He should be boiled in oil!

The keyhole in the lever cap makes it pre-1933. I concur with Dave on the type/date 13 - 1925 - 29. As long as the knob and tote are firmly secured, that should be a good, usable plane.

You can try the Plane dating mega chart too, which is a lot of fun but a bit confusing sometimes.
 

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The Rexmill site is very good.

Looking at your initial pictures, I think the lateral adjustment lever is missing a small round disc which fits in the blade slot. I see the pin for the disc but not the disc.

This is a picture of the frog with the disc on the lateral adjustment lever. Picture from the Rexmill site.

 

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For future use, this is one of a number of decent Stanley plane dating sites, this one by Patrick Leach. Not the most accurate, but one of the easiest to use.

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/dating_flowchart.php#Type%2018
Just to set the record straight, Hyperkitten is the work of the esteemed Josh Clark, not Patrick Leach -- the latter is the author of the now-famous "Blood & Gore"-- a great site for learning about Stanley planes, but not a type study.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dave Paine said:
The Rexmill site is very good.

Looking at your initial pictures, I think the lateral adjustment lever is missing a small round disc which fits in the blade slot. I see the pin for the disc but not the disc.

This is a picture of the frog with the disc on the lateral adjustment lever. Picture from the Rexmill site.
It is missing that....I guess this ones going in a cabinet for a while until I find a donor parts one.
 

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It is missing that....I guess this ones going in a cabinet for a while until I find a donor parts one.
Before you put this away, I would take a closer look at all the odd-ball screws. This will help you know how many parts you would need in order to restore.

The challenge with buying a parts plane, is that they do not always have all the parts you want.

I purchased a No. 5 parts plane. At the time I really needed a toe screw for the tote.

Turns out the toe screw was a force-fit replacement. Happy to find it did not damage the thread. Similar force-fit for the long tote screw.

The blade has been sharpened almost down to the slot. The lever cap has been used as a screwdriver too much. Looks awful.

The casting, frog and knob are good for future use.

Tool Metal
 
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