Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm debating on putting poly on the interior of my log cabin or letting it age naturally. The wood is southern yellow pine and the cabin was built about 9 months ago. I can't find any websites with good pictures. Any recommendations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
I'm debating on putting poly on the interior of my log cabin or letting it age naturally. The wood is southern yellow pine and the cabin was built about 9 months ago. I can't find any websites with good pictures. Any recommendations?
I'm wiring a log home now and the contractor has sprayed the inside with polyurethane....there was a lot of cleaning beforehand though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
I've got a coffee table that I can post some before and after pictures. It will be a couple of days before I get home to do it though. I've got pictures of it freshly sanded and I can take pictures of it now about 10 months later with just an oil based poly on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
Sorry it has taken me so long to get these posted but I've had alot going on at home.

This is a before picture taken around August of 2005



This one was taken just now, March of 2007.



So your looking at about a year and a half of aging. THis finish is a wood floor poly that I used to use. Very tough and has not been harmed by water stains. We avoid any kind of chemical cleaners because it will cause problems down the road if it ever needed a new coat of finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wow! That looks great! When did you put the poly on it? That's my issue, now, I'm thinking of waiting a little while for the wood to turn naturally and then apply some poly on it to preserve it.

My dilemma is that I'm about to put T&G on the vaulted/cathedral ceilings and I was wondering if I should have the poly sprayed on it first and then put up...or wait until it ages then poly it...but it would be more difficult to apply the poly later. Hhhhmmm...so, I'm torn.

I just didn't want to wait and then the wood turns gray/brown like outside fences. Would that even do that inside?? I don't think so...

Some people say wait because the wood would look really nice when it turns naturally...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
Don't wait for it to age before you apply a finish. The problem with that idea is the wood will become contaminated with oils from your hands and dirt and dust from the airborne particles. An oil finish will age naturally and turn an Amberish color over time. It will be hard to tell unless you take pictures when you first apply the finish and compare with pictures a year down the road. You will also want to be carefull of anything that covers the walls up and doesn't allow for the sun to come in contact with the wood. If the sun cannot get to the wood it will not turn a darker color and match the surrounding wood. It is especially bad with flooring and rugs. If you don't move your rugs around periodically then you will end up with a spot the size of the rug that will not match the surrounding area. ONce the damage is done there is no way to fix it. Even sanding the wood back down and refinishing will still allow the discoloration to be seen.

I think I've rambled on enough and I hope the helps. If it was me I would apply an oil finish of some kind as soon as the wood has been sanded. For ceilings and walls I prefer to prefinish before installation but you will have to be carefull not to damage the finish while installing it.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top