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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a 12' wide by 14' deep lean to shed. It will be installed on a sloped area and will be about 1 foot off the ground at the high side and 2' or so at the low side.
I am new to all of this so this is a great task for me and my family.
1) How many piers do I need to pour and their spacing?
The ground is pretty solid dirt. Im in Nebraska if that matters at all.

Could I do 3 in the front and 3 in the back and run 4x6 front to back.
Can i move them in from the edge so that it reduces the span from 14' down to say 10'?? Shed would hang over 2' on each side?

2)Could i use 2x6 floor joists? would they span the 6'?

Thanks for any help or other suggestions.
 

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My shed sits on concrete blocks. Built in 2002, it has been through two hurricanes, including Hurricane Ike, which came very close to us.

I recreated the shed once I learned how to use Sketchup.

You know the old saying..."A good foundation..." UGH! I forgot the rest.

My shed is 10 x 12. I have been making a few repairs (new doors, etc)
Good luck with your project.
Mike
 

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Piers are normally 10' apart which doesn't fit well with your building. One in the center should be sufficient. Really on top of the piers you should run a heavier timber like a 4x6 and run your 2x6's over the top. http://www.georgia-foundation-repair.com/
As an alternative to 4x6, you could double your 2x6's.
Since it's a shed, it all depends on how much weight will go inside.
If it is planned for lightweight assortment of gardening tools, lawn mowers, etc. a 2x6 might be all you need. That's all you would get if you bought a portable building.
Be sure to use treated lumber for the joist.
Also, since your floor and walls will most likely be covered with 4x8 sheets, you might consider changing your dimensions so you can lay the floor and walls with less cutting.
Consider 12x 16.
 

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Piers are normally 10' apart which doesn't fit well with your building. One in the center should be sufficient. Really on top of the piers you should run a heavier timber like a 4x6 and run your 2x6's over the top. http://www.georgia-foundation-repair.com/
As an alternative to 4x6, you could double your 2x6's.
Either way, be sure to use treated lumber for this.
Also, since your floor and walls will most likely be covered with 4x8 sheets, you might consider changing your dimensions so you can lay the floor and walls with less cutting. Consider 12x 16.
 

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As an alternative to 4x6, you could double your 2x6's.
Either way, be sure to use treated lumber for this.
Also, since your floor and walls will most likely be covered with 4x8 sheets, you might consider changing your dimensions so you can lay the floor and walls with less cutting. Consider 12x 16.
That's a good point. The only reason I made my shed 10x12 is 120 sq/ft is the max the HOA would allow. :eek::yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Chamfer-Are you saying to put my floor right over the top of the piers. Double up the 2x8 or 2x6 on the perimeter of the floor? Would a doubled up 2x6 span 8'. I am now thinking about making the shed 12' x 16.
9 piers.
 

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Yes, right on the piers. And yes doubling up on the band around the perimeter.

Code for housing around here is a 2x6 spanning less than 8ft max. A 2x8 can span a little over 10ft.

If you end up going 12x16 you can either go with 6 outside piers spanning 8ft, and 2x8's cantilevered 2ft on each side, OR 6 outside piers spanning the full 12ft and 2x10's, OR 9 piers with outsides spanning the full 12ft and 2x8's.


I personally wouldnt use 2x6's unless it was like an 8x10 or smaller.
 

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The reason for the double band is because there is no consistent solid foundation. The spans on construction material are rated individually specifically.

I would personally also add some Simpson Ties to attach the band to the piers. Also teko's to all floor joists.


This is all assuming the piers are below grade with a footer. If youve just set concrete blocks on top of the ground then theres not really any point in worrying about securing the framing to the piers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The piers will range from 6" off the ground to 18" off the ground.
I am going to use 9 piers..3 rows of 3.
Set 4x6x16 on the piers. Fasten to piers with some sore of angle that I fab up.
CAN I DRILL HOLES FOR A CONCRETE ANCHOR IN THE TOP OF THE PIER INSTEAD OF PLACING SOMETHING INTO THE CONCRETE BEFORE IT SETS UP?
I will then run 2x6 perpendicular to the 4x6 to creat my floor.

Would all of this work?
 

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letsjump,

Have you ever heard folks saying,you can't build a shop too big?Well,that is patently,WRONG....those folks either,have never been in a truly large facility....or,just as likely,don't have deep enough pockets.


So,while a shop can in fact be,too large.......a footer,can not.I once put a footer under a 50HP single cyl Joy compressor that we literally,dug to H*ll......and it STILL vibrated the 50,000 sq ft factory.

If you err on a footer....most definitely,err on the large size.Good luck with your build....and we love pics,hint,hint.
 

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I live in North Carolina, lots of trees. Southernmbuilding code requires us to put piers every 6 ft and that they be on footings 12" below grade. We have to fame the foundation in treated wood, not for weather, but for termites. Termites hate the stuff. Also, we are required to cable strap double band on,parimeter with cables to concrete piers. This is for wind. The side of a storeroom is a giant sail if the winds get over 80 miles an hour. Do you guys get tornadoes?
I have seen whole shops moved a half mile in a tornado. I am sold on strapdowns because I used to be an insurance appraiser.
 
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