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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to resize a ¾” picture frame and it had angle shaped fasteners to hold the miter corners together. I managed to save 3 out of the 4 and I don’t know how they managed to get them in originally, but they don’t like their going back in without splitting the wood.
I can’t even find more of the same and I want to use something else. What kind of hardware do picture framers normally use for thin frames?
 

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The problem with that kind of fastener is it works better shot in with a pneumatic gun. Driving them in with a hammer tends to split the wood far more often. If you are doing a lot of these it may be worthwhile trying to get a gun. I think Senco makes one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The problem with that kind of fastener is it works better shot in with a pneumatic gun. Driving them in with a hammer tends to split the wood far more often. If you are doing a lot of these it may be worthwhile trying to get a gun. I think Senco makes one.
Thanks Steve,
I just now got back from Lowe's and I could not find those L-shaped fasteners, but I did find another kind of fastener. It looks like it will no tear up the wood as bad. Plan B was to use small L-Brackets and screws or maybe even glue them on without the screws. I have already glued the corners together, but I just don’t trust it with only glue on this small of a surface area.
 

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I use NO mechanical fastenera. I find glue to be sufficient. If you just MUST add somet hing then I would suggest a spline.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I use NO mechanical fastenera. I find glue to be sufficient. If you just MUST add somet hing then I would suggest a spline.

George
Thanks George for your input, I think I’ve only done 2 picture frames in my life, but never one this thin. :no:

I thought about a spline and it would mean I would have to sand the gold leaf finish off. I’m just not that interested in spending too much time on this.

The reason I don’t trust the glue is I only have 0.645 sq inches of surface area per corner with 3/32” glass and 1/8” Hardboard. I’m now thinking of 1/8 Clear Polycarbonate because its almost unbreakable and light weight but $33 for LEXAN is a little unsettling to me.

I’m also thinking of gluing the hardboard to the frame for added support and that may be a mistake at least with the glass.
 

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Professional frame shops often use V-nails, which are what you took out. They can be hammer driven but shops have a specialized tool for inserting them. The fasteners you found at Lowes are called "Scotch" fasteners. They work a little like pinch dogs, if you know what those are. The points are angled and pull the two pieces together as they are driven in. It's best to use a hardwood block and a hammer with those so you drive them in evenly. Better than nothing but not by much. If there are any artist suppliers or frame shops near you, they might have V-nails, Lowes and other borgs don't carry these type of special supplys.
http://www.grignonsart.com/pictureframingsupplies/v-nails.html
 

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I'm with George - but if you don't want to spend the time, how about a thin small square piece of luan on each corner glued to span the joint on the back side. Just make sure you sand down the area to get any finish off so as to expose wood for the luan glue up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Simple insurance would be a couple small finishing nails or pins in each corner, should really be using anti-glare glass.
Thanks Frank, but I'm not exactly sure what anti-glare glass is or if they sell it at Lowe's.

Professional frame shops often use V-nails, which are what you took out. They can be hammer driven but shops have a specialized tool for inserting them. The fasteners you found at Lowes are called "Scotch" fasteners. They work a little like pinch dogs, if you know what those are. The points are angled and pull the two pieces together as they are driven in. It's best to use a hardwood block and a hammer with those so you drive them in evenly. Better than nothing but not by much. If there are any artist suppliers or frame shops near you, they might have V-nails, Lowes and other borgs don't carry these type of special supplys.
http://www.grignonsart.com/pictureframingsupplies/v-nails.html
Thanks Hammer, so they are called V-nails. :huh: No wonder I couldn't find anything on line and I looked at way too many photos of picture frame fasteners. LOL.

I was afraid to hammer those "Scotch" fasteners in so I used a piece of wood and a C-clamp to press them in. I guess they are Ok, but only time will tell. :smile:

Anyway I'm watching YouTube videos on how to cut glass because I don't think Lowe's cut glass anymore. Its been over 30 years since I've gut glass and I believe it didn't come out to well if my memory serves me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm with George - but if you don't want to spend the time, how about a thin small square piece of luan on each corner glued to span the joint on the back side. Just make sure you sand down the area to get any finish off so as to expose wood for the luan glue up.
Thanks Bernie, That's another great idea, I wish I would have thought of it sooner. :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Need help gutting glass

My actual glass size is 19 5/8” x 27 3/8” and the closest size is 24” x 30”. My question is: Can I cut a long 2 5/8” thin strip off without having a bunch of small broken pieces or should I buy a much larger piece of glass?

I believe the last time I tried this, my piece looked more like a saw blade than a straight edge which eventually cracked in many places across the pane. :thumbdown:

I guess I didn’t think this through. I should have cut the frame to fit the glass and then fit the picture to the frame. Oh well mark this up to a learning experience.
 

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My actual glass size is 19 5/8” x 27 3/8” and the closest size is 24” x 30”. My question is: Can I cut a long 2 5/8” thin strip off without having a bunch of small broken pieces or should I buy a much larger piece of glass?
I believe the last time I tried this, my piece looked more like a saw blade than a straight edge which eventually cracked in many places across the pane. :thumbdown:
Easiest method, go to a glass shop, give them the exact measurement and they will cut it.

If you are cutting it only score it once with a good sharp cutter, piece should snap off when tapped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok just got back from Lowes and it turns out they do cut glass. I guess it was Home Depot who dropped the whole Glass sales thing.

Anyway It took the guy two tries to get it cut. He kept getting one side 1/8” too wide. So as soon as I got home I put the glass in to the frame and found out it was out of square which would explain the discrepancy. The glass was cut 19 5/8” on one corner and 19 3/4” on the other, so I may have to chisel out the extra 1/8” in the frame. I did not want to spend this much time on a picture. :furious:
 

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Ok just got back from Lowes and it turns out they do cut glass. I guess it was Home Depot who dropped the whole Glass sales thing.

Anyway It took the guy two tries to get it cut. He kept getting one side 1/8” too wide. So as soon as I got home I put the glass in to the frame and found out it was out of square which would explain the discrepancy. The glass was cut 19 5/8” on one corner and 19 3/4” on the other, so I may have to chisel out the extra 1/8” in the frame. I did not want to spend this much time on a picture. :furious:
If you will be doing many frames, it would pay to cut your own glass. Get yourself an oil filled cutter, and you can make your own straightedge out of Plexiglas, like this.






.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I don’t really plan on doing this again and if I do, I will buy standard off-the-shelf glass and make the frame to fit the glass. I can always make the picture fit with a border around it. :smile:

Anyway I decided to cut a relief dado in the picture frame to take up the excess glass.



It was a little scary because I had to cut backwards in the router table. I tried going the correct way but the feather board used to hold down the frame was in the way and I didn't want to take the frame apart. I could have probably figured something else out, but I just wanted to get it done. DO NOT DO THIS! It is very Dangerous.
 

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I buy my glass from frame destination.com
They are very well priced. For me I don't pay shipping because they are close enough I pick up my orders. If you go to a craft store they charge way too much. Lowes charges too much to cut as well. Go on that website and you can order any size you want and it's tons cheaper
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I buy my glass from frame destination.com
They are very well priced. For me I don't pay shipping because they are close enough I pick up my orders. If you go to a craft store they charge way too much. Lowes charges too much to cut as well. Go on that website and you can order any size you want and it's tons cheaper
Shipping here is way too much, in fact I think they charge extra for Southern CA. I checked out the shipping at http://www.framedestination.com and it was $10.54 which was more then I paid for the glass cut to size at Lowe's.

When I checked into frame prices around here, I found they start at $50 and mine would have been close to $90. The glass cost me under $10 from Lowe’s, so I’m still ahead of the game. I already had the frame hanging in the garage for probably 20 years and just didn’t have a picture to put in it. :smile:

Anyway I am not having a great deal of luck on this simple little project. Yesterday I bought a 4x8 sheet of 1/8” luan to use for a facade over my daughters fire place and had it cut to 70 ½” long. I was going to use the scrap piece for this picture frame, but it ended up too short. When I measured the facade piece, I discovered that guy had cut it 80 ½” long losing 10” for my picture backing. Plus now I have to re-cut the facade piece to size. :furious:
 

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Looks like you came awful close to trapping the workpiece between the bit and fence. I've seen the after effect of a trapped workpiece. Usually comes with blood and kindling wood!
 
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