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Which tool do you want to build and swap?

  • Bow saw (blade(s) and pins will be from a kit)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • wooden plane (looking into a source for the blade)

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • router plane (blades can be bought from Lv or Ln)

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • dovetail templets

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • marking knife (blade can be bought or crafted)

    Votes: 9 47.4%
  • panel gauge (blade can be bought or crafted)

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • try squares (a set of 3 each a different size)

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • bevel / miter gauge

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • winding sticks

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • layout square (Roubo / Christopher Schwarz style)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 20 of 343 Posts

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master sawdust maker
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
below is the list we will be polling on to do the tool swap. since there is a limit of 10 for the poll. I had to delete a few from the original list. If the tool you wanted to build / swap is not on this list, dont fret. Im sure we will be doing another swap in the near future, and It can be added to that list.

1. Bow saw (blade(s) and pins would come from a kit),
2. wooden plane (looking into a source for blades for everyone to use),
3. router plane, (blades can be bought from LV or LN),
4. dovetail templets,
5. marking knife (blade could be bought or crafted),
6. panel gauge (blade could be bought or crafted),
7. try squares (a set of 3 each a different size),
8. bevel / miter gauge,
9. winding sticks,
10. lay out square (Roubo / Christopher Schwarz style),

Oh! Btw, if you are not participating - do not vote!!!

Photos and information received from the following:
1. Alchymist
2. Bumbus
3. Wema826
4. Firemedic
5. Al B thayer
6. trc65
7. sprung
8. old air force
9. ktp
10. jharris2
 

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master sawdust maker
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437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
ADMIN, can you please sticky this thread? it would be appreciated greatly!
 

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master sawdust maker
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437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WHAT? how dare you!


lol not at all. in fact, thank you, Jean! I forgot to add that part.
 

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Wood Snob
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5,963 Posts
John
# 7 would require building 3 try squares?

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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master sawdust maker
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437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
John
# 7 would require building 3 try squares?

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
yes, my thinking was it is something that could be batched out. if the wooden blade is used, then it would be on the easier side.

I asked the same thing, Al. John has wooden blade sqaures in mind and according to him they only take 5 min each to make, sooo... :boat:
and i said I once made 6 in a day. so that would average 4 hours per......wise guy :censored:
 

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Wood Snob
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5,963 Posts
Wema826 said:
yes, my thinking was it is something that could be batched out. if the wooden blade is used, then it would be on the easier side.

and i said I once made 6 in a day. so that would average 4 hours per......wise guy :censored:
Well......who'd thunk.

Okay I'm no closer to casting my vote than I was before. Really good choices though.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Ok, this may be a stupid question but please bear with me.

-This square sets a 90° angle only. In my mind would be a "uni-square"

Wood Hardwood Lumber Floor Rectangle

-This square sets a 90° angle and by indexing the 45° bevel at the intersection of the two parts to the work piece it also sets a 45° angle.
Thus, in my mind this is a "bi-square.

Metal

Both are called a tri-square.

Why?

Where's that confounded third angle?

Primate Common chimpanzee Text Photo caption Human
 

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It is not a "tri" square, but rather a try square. Here's an explanation from Wiki:

A try square is a woodworking or a metal working tool used for marking and measuring a piece of wood. The square refers to the tool's primary use of measuring the accuracy of a right angle (90 degrees); to try a surface is to check its straightness or correspondence to an adjoining surface. A piece of wood that is rectangular, flat, and has all edges (faces, sides, and ends) 90 degrees is called four square. A board is often milled four square in preparation for using it in building furniture.[1]
A traditional try square has a broad blade made of steel that is riveted to a wooden handle or 'stock'. The inside of the wooden stock usually has a brass strip fixed to it to reduce wear. Some blades also have graduations for measurement. Modern try squares may be all-metal, with stocks that are either die-cast or extruded.[1]
'Try square' is sometimes spelled 'tri square' although its etymology is from 'trying', in the sense of testing, rather than the prefix 'tri-' meaning three.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Try_square#cite_note-TechStudent-1
 

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Thank you sir!

It was the try/tri thing that caused my confusion.

I think I'd hate to make one of those.

I mean if its not exactly 90° its not a square s it?

I can see myself standing amidst a pile of tear soaked clumps of hair and rejects babbling incoherently until the white coats came to sedate me and take me to my new padded accommodations.
 

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Wood Snob
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jharris2 said:
Ok, this may be a stupid question but please bear with me.

-This square sets a 90° angle only. In my mind would be a "uni-square"

-This square sets a 90° angle and by indexing the 45° bevel at the intersection of the two parts to the work piece it also sets a 45° angle.
Thus, in my mind this is a "bi-square.

Both are called a tri-square.

Why?

Where's that confounded third angle?
With out looking for the answer. I would think the Tri is an inside 90 an outside 90 and a 90 on the edge. ?

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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You actually had me trying to figure out where the third angle was as well. :wallbash:

I was going to postulate that a straight line actually has an angle of zero degrees and thus is technically an angle - it sounded as dumb then as it does now:laughing: - so I Googled it.
 

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Wood Snob
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jharris2 said:
Ok, this may be a stupid question but please bear with me.

-This square sets a 90° angle only. In my mind would be a "uni-square"

-This square sets a 90° angle and by indexing the 45° bevel at the intersection of the two parts to the work piece it also sets a 45° angle.
Thus, in my mind this is a "bi-square.

Both are called a tri-square.

Why?

Where's that confounded third angle?
I looked. It's called a try square because it's for trying the 90 to check for true. It's sometimes spelled Tri.

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 
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