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Tool Fanactic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a busy two days the end of this week. After I picked up my 20" Clement jointer I headed south from the capital of WI and made my next stop.

Old shed up on the hill.



I think there is more then just bees, rats and a foot of filth in there...



This pattern maker's lathe was hiding in there amongst the filth, rodents and roof leaks.



First thing we did (the owner and I) was to brush hog the weeds down, then use a string trimmer to clean up what we missed. Then he brought me a bucket of soil to spread around and fill all the holes so we didn't break an ankle. Then I started cleaning. I found a bee hive, lathe tooling and two front loader buckets worth of trash.

I was still thinking how I wanted to get this thing out of there, so I decided to start pulling parts off, just in case things went wrong.



 

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Tool Fanactic
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
About that time, I decided I could jack it up and put 2x6 runners under it length wise and get it over the concrete threshold and slid out to fresh air.

The onwer asked if I wanted to go eat some lunch and get some lumber, I could not turn him down, so off we went. He paid for lunch and the needed lumber.

We got back and my reinforcements arrived. We made a plan, used my pallet jack and some blocking and got it lifted up and runners bolted to the sets of legs. Next we jockeyed it around with the pallet jack and then was able to get a strap on it and hooked to the loader bucket of the tractor.

I was able to steer the end in the building with my big johnson bar and out it came into the daylight.





Then we picked it up and sat it on the trailer. Then walked back up the hill and proceeded to take the counter shaft with clutch and hangers down (that was heavy and it got Karl all dirty).

Then we put it all back together on the trailer and loaded up all the goodies that came with it.





Here is everything that came with it, I have no clue as to what most of it is as this is my first lathe and I have never turned a thing before....

I hope to knock out some killer pens on this thing.













 

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where's my table saw?
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Cool find!

My limited experience with metal lathes can be applied here. Those things with the hole in the center and the dog leg fit in the face plate in the center ellipse for turning small diameter shafts. The set screw bites on the shaft, centering it in the "V" and then the dog leg makes it turn.
 

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Senior Member
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Impressive old lathe. Looked like a lot of work to get that out and on your trailer.

I look forward to the future killer pen pictures. :laughing:

What size motor is on the lathe?

Thanks for sharing. :thumbsup:
 

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Awesome piece of machinery! Warner, I don't know how you do it. You rescue and restore these wonderful pieces of history, run a business and raise your family. Have you perfected the 36 hour day?
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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That looks similar to one I have. I'll have another look from a larger screen in a few hours
 

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here is one very similar in my neck of the woods but it is direct drive. i wonder if they were made by same company. I have thought about getting it but then again I do not use the lathe much I have now
 

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Tool Fanactic
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This has been sitting too long, the time has come to use it or loose it.

I have questions about these centers. I just got the center out of the tail stock (which seems to be a live center someone had made for it) and was able to remove the center from the head stock (seems to be a spur drive?)

What are the additional centers for?

It also looks like the face plate will unthread as well?

Tailstock center on left headstock center on right



Another view:



Other centers that came with it, what are they, what/when are they used? (Yes, I have no clue at this moment)





Is it best to use a live center or dead center? Which ones are for which end? Those seem like dumb questions.

Current faceplate:



I have the tail stock disassembled and ready to finish cleaning and get painted. The legs will take some pretty extensive work to get back into the shape I want them to be.
 

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where's my table saw?
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in my experience ...

The spur center drives the work so it goes in the head stock. The live center allows the work to turn, so it goes in the tailstock. The "dead" centers go in the tailstock as well. Sometimes you may need a smaller diameter in there? Face plates are for larger pieces, bowls and such.
I have more experience on a metal lathe than a wood lathe, but I can turn wood on it also, not vice versa however. These tools are the same as my metal tool holders. This may also may have been a metal lathe, I donno, depends on the feed screw and if there are gears in the drive system? Maybe just used some of the parts from one, since it's too long .... maybe rifle barrels? :laughing:






These are used with metal bars and two centers and a faceplate. The dog leg goes in the slot on the faceplate, the centers keep the rod "centered", but allow it to turn. You need a countersink in each end of the bar/rod, and only works on already round stock, the diameter that slips into the hole on the dog.
 

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The faceplate is suppose to unscrew counterclockwise. Yours has been on there so long you will probably have H getting it off but you've been there before with vintage equipment. Once you get the faceplate off you might put a piece of fine sandpaper on a dowel inside the spindle hole with it running to clean the rust out. The spur center you have in the first picture I would dispose of. It's too chewed up to use. If the one in the third picture is a different one maybe it is in better condition. Otherwise you might consider buying a new one. As far as the tailstock centers you are always better off with a live center. Personally I don't care for that type. I prefer a cup live center, (has the appearance of the one you have in the fourth picture, top left) Most of the the centers you have are just spur and dead centers. The cup center pictured in the fourth picture second from left I don't think I would use. The cup is so shallow I would be afraid it would let the wood slip out of the lathe.
 

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novice wood hacker
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The spur center drives the work so it goes in the head stock. The live center allows the work to turn, so it goes in the tailstock. The "dead" centers go in the tailstock as well. Sometimes you may need a smaller diameter in there?
In addition to what he said, the dead centers work well for low speed operations which could overload the small bearings in the live center, such as knurling. You have to put some lube in there though. You can also use them as drive centers with the dogs and the slotted faceplate.
 

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Tool Fanactic
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I will try to clean up and refurbish any centers I can, I believe this is a #8 jarno taper and those things don't come by cheap or easy.

I am not sure how to even get the live center apart or how that point is in there.
 
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