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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never cut my own lumber before. Thought I'd give it a try when my folks asked me to take down an old crab apple for them last weekend.

Is paste wax an acceptable sealer on the end grain? It was the only thing I had on hand that seemed like it might work. I'm not getting any checking yet, but its only been two days.

Thanks for any input.
 

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Anything will do, even old paint.
The intent is to even out the rates of water loss from the end grain cut wood "plumbing"
when that is compared with the water loss from the "sides of the pipes."
Two days? Let us know what happens in 2 months, then 2 years.
Air dried, stickered and stacked out doors under cover and NOT cooked in a shed,
imagine 1" per year. So you give a 2" slab 12-18 months.
 

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Anchorseal is cheap- better and goes a long ways- apple is tough -all fruit woods are. Not to disagree but the 1 yr per inch is very iffy. You have high temps and High humidity in summer. Me I have High temps and humidity in the teens sometimes in the summer. Put it in a cool dry spot and wait a few years.
 
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Old paint is the cheapest thing going. Don't forget what the objective is.
I cannot think of more difficult woods to dry successfully than fruit woods.
Yeah, 1"/yr is iffy. Can't disasgree.
Depends so much on local climate and the variations from year to year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses.

I've done some reading (mostly Roy Underhill, Krenov) and it seemed like paint, glue, some finishes, etc would work since they all separate the wood from the air. But you don't know what you don't know, right?

Mike1950 you got it right. This year is an exception, but summer in Ohio is usually an adventure in sweating. We know how to bring the humid. I know this stuff is going to take forever to dry.
 

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Thanks for the responses.

I've done some reading (mostly Roy Underhill, Krenov) and it seemed like paint, glue, some finishes, etc would work since they all separate the wood from the air. But you don't know what you don't know, right?

Mike1950 you got it right. This year is an exception, but summer in Ohio is usually an adventure in sweating. We know how to bring the humid. I know this stuff is going to take forever to dry.
Put it in a cool corner- forever might help- if it drys fast it self destructs...........
 

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My posts #3 and #5 are a very short summary of what you need to do.
I am a retired dendrology professor. I can crap on for an entire semester
about the rates and losses from radial, tangential and transverse surfaces.

You don't need that. I don't need that. I ran out of spit in 2006.
 

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I took a Dendrology course back in '75 at the University of Missouri. I still remember most of the Latin names.

Anchorseal is my first choice for sealing end grain. In relation to the amount you use and the value of the wood, it is worth it. I've seen driveway sealer suggested, and might give it a try. At least it is available locally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got some wood glue on them a little while ago. Couldn't find Anchorseal locally, but I have plenty of almost-empty bottles of glue.

My wife got really excited when she saw the slabs, then really disappointed when she learned its gonna be 2+ years before they are anything other than in the way.
 

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I am a retired Dendrology professor.
There's no voo-doo doo-doo about this.
Old paint works as well as anything.
The objective is to dramatically slow down the water
loss from the cut ends = more even with the sides.
 
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