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The only thing I do differently is that I dont use Z Clips on the long side which is usually along the grain. If the table top is relatively long, I just design the apron with an extra stretcher or two. I dont want to take the chance that the wood shrinking cycle is not at its greatest or least and slides out of the clip and then when expanding cycle it just wont slide back in or the reverse.
That's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Regarding clips. In my situation, I would be looking to avoid gluing the solid wood to the ply. So, the clip would be screwed into the underneath of the chessboard/solid wood. Which is only about 3/8. not much meat there.
 

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How big will the table top be?
Reason I asked is that if all the gluing went just perfect, the top will still only be 3/8" thick. It might be ok, I'm just not used to going that thin. Let's see wht others think. Many people on here have made similar projects.
BTW, If I am looking down on the top, will I be looking at long grain or end grain?
 

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Just on several forums moving back and forth..I’m bad about not double checking..
Every time I post on here, I reread my stuff and then press "Post Reply". It is not until then, when it posted, that I see all my errors and have to correct them. Notice I wrote 'correct them' rather than 'correct it'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
How big will the table top be?
Reason I asked is that if all the gluing went just perfect, the top will still only be 3/8" thick. It might be ok, I'm just not used to going that thin. Let's see wht others think. Many people on here have made similar projects.
BTW, If I am looking down on the top, will I be looking at long grain or end grain?
Well, the chess board will be just over 16". I only have strips right now as I was hesitant to move forward. When I rip them all to the same size, they should be just over 2" each... maybe 2 and 1/8.

So, 16" for the board and then I figure at a 5 inch apron all around to make it a bit bigger. If a 26" square is too big I might go for a rectanglur apron. 5" front/back, 1-2 on the left/right. Still tbd but that is the ballpark.

As for the 3/8, I have apple and maple. the apples are actualy 1/2 and the maples are closer to 3/8. I had asked earlier if I should leave the gaps underneath when the tops are flush. I dont have a thickness planer, but someone suggested a router on a sled. So, I could knock it down to less then 3/8. I figure the options are... router it down, leave the gaps, or fill with epoxy (not sure if that is just plain silly, was just my orginal thought for a flush bottom)

It is long grain from the top, not end grain. It looks like the maple is qs and the apple is plain.
 

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And just when I started to feel confident about glueing the squares to the substrate.

Ok, veneer isnt an option because Im doing this because of the wood I have, as opposed to buying wood because of the project I want to make. What i can do, I suppose, is cut the pieces thinner. Not down to veneer thickness but... 1/4, maybe 1/8? Would that have any impact?

So, the suggestion of screwing, with slots means no glue at all? Essentially as you would with a panel in a cabinet door? Are tables normally made that way? I guess part of the answer is that tables arent normally solid wood on top of ply/mdf.

So.... back to no knowing what to do as far as securing the chess board to its base.

And I was this close.
The guy in this video seems to have glued his chess board to plywood. Is your design similar to his construction?

I don't know for sure, but since your squares are so small I would have to think lateral growth is not nearly as much as in the bad idea I had when I heavily glued AND screwed an 18" wide oak board to an 18" wide piece of plywood 😖 . So you may be ok to glue those small squares down.

Or screw it down and put the screws in slots instead of holes.

Maybe get some inspiration from how they properly attach breadboard ends to table tops.

 

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Well, the chess board will be just over 16". I only have strips right now as I was hesitant to move forward. When I rip them all to the same size, they should be just over 2" each... maybe 2 and 1/8.

So, 16" for the board and then I figure at a 5 inch apron all around to make it a bit bigger. If a 26" square is too big I might go for a rectanglur apron. 5" front/back, 1-2 on the left/right. Still tbd but that is the ballpark.

As for the 3/8, I have apple and maple. the apples are actualy 1/2 and the maples are closer to 3/8. I had asked earlier if I should leave the gaps underneath when the tops are flush. I dont have a thickness planer, but someone suggested a router on a sled. So, I could knock it down to less then 3/8. I figure the options are... router it down, leave the gaps, or fill with epoxy (not sure if that is just plain silly, was just my orginal thought for a flush bottom)

It is long grain from the top, not end grain. It looks like the maple is qs and the apple is plain.
Time out! 😳😳😳

You are way overthinking and overcomplicating this. This is not the same as gluing a solid board to plywood!!

Go back and read my post. You’ll be fine.


I had asked earlier if I should leave the gaps underneath when the tops are flush.
Please explain what this means so I don’t have to go back thru the posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
"I had asked earlier if I should leave the gaps underneath when the tops are flush..."
Please explain what this means so I don’t have to go back thru the posts.
The apple strips are 3/8, the maple 1/2. I flip them over and put the good sides down. then glue them. The bad side now has gaps where the apple strips are lower than the the maple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Time out! 😳😳😳
You are way overthinking and overcomplicating this. This is not the same as gluing a solid board to plywood!!
Go back and read my post. You’ll be fine.
Ok, so I should just glue it to 3/4 ply, put the borders on and move forward? Perfect. Thats my plan.
Questions.
1) Would it help/matter to make the solid wood part thinner? So I will glue and then with a router and sled get it level even where the strips are different heights (as if I had a thickness planer) So, I will make it a uniform height, approx 3/8. Would it be better if I knocked it down to 1/4, 3/16, or 1/8?
2) Regarding the apron/edging. Let say the board is 3/8 + 6/8 for the ply. Of course the edging is 9/8. The apron (thats what Im called the wide border (5") between the board and edging would also be 3/8, not 9/8 or is that irrelevant
 

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The only question is gluing to the ply/mdf. Two good answers above: 1) pieces are stable with little chance of movement so glue to the substrate and 2) allow for expansion as in a cabinet door.

Regarding method #1 or #2, would you ignore the gaps due to the height differences of the pieces? Or glue them flush and fill the gaps in the back with epoxy so that too is flush (and then final glue to substrate or use panel style)? Or just use as-is?
Assemble so you achieve the look you want. I wouldn’t want gaps in my chessboard so I wouldn’t suggest that method. You might like it. Your chessboard is small and your wood is dry so if you seal well to slow moisture movement you should be fine. To be extra cautious put the same thickness “veneer” as the chess grid on the other side of the plywood.

If it were me I would take my chances with a just gluing your grid to plywood and seal everything well. In fact I am making a table top for my new grill cart with 1/2” thick hardwood pieces glued to 3/4” plywood right now. I am not gluing 1/2 strips to the bottom to compensate. I am filling all the gaps and sealing the best way I can imagine. Since I could be heading for a potato chip top in the future please take my suggestion with a grain of salt.
 
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