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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used an air palm nailer? I've looked at a few and was wondering about prices. I checked the two big box stores and they run about $80, found one at Grizzly for $20. Anyone know what the difference is?
 

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That's easy...60 bucks...:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

I had only one it was a CP and I sure didn't wear it out...it did not perform like I believed that it should. I found it to work best in those upside down left handed places....:icon_wink: :icon_wink:
 

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I had one, but it is not that cool. I would use it framing houses to attach huricane straps, but its loud, no faster than a hammer, and very few aplications where it would be benificial, so if you are getting one, get the cheap one. but, if you have athritis, and you dont want to swing a hammer, I would get the nice one.
 

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My plan for it was to reduce the stresses on my wrist and forearm while nailing trusses and such together. I have a good 5 hp compressor and a decent regulator (I can airbrush and paint with it). My current project, a shed/cabin, I have driven over 10k nails by hand. I don't want a framing gun because the nails are hard to find around here and they are expensive. I think I'll try out the one from Grizzly. If I only use it to nail truss plates, it should pay for itself.
 

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I have one and it pretty fancy. Came in it's own hardcase with various attachments even like a spade chisel and some other handy dandy attachments I can't even recall right now. I can't even remember the brand it is not one of the big known names. . . . I want to say this company makes only palm nailers is why.
You can tell though it is high quality gear. Especially when you use it. I've only used it a couple of times but I wouldn't want to be without it now that I know how valuable it is when nothing else will do.
I bought it at a pawn shop when I was looking for my stolen tools.
I hope I didn't buy a tool some poor dude is wishing he had back.:glare:
 

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Palm nailer use

First palm nailers are not meant to replace hammers,and anyone trying to use one for daily nailing should leave the sauce alone.On occaision a hammer or nailgun don't fit,in comes the palm nailer.My son bought me one a few years back and let me tell you it seams as if i run into tight spots all the time on renovations,floor joist repairs,tight spots around gables,and since you shouldn't use screws on structual repairs its the only choice and deserves a trophy in my book.I think my son purchased it from home depot for around $ 50.00 or 60.00 ,there is a plastic version out that i would stay away from.
 

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. . . and since you shouldn't use screws on structual repairs . . .

Okay, ya gotta explain this one to me. Structural repair is a very general term and can encompass thousands of scenarios with endless combinations. What do you mean when you say screws should not be used for structural repairs? I have never heard such a specific admonition used in so general a sense.
Educate me! :yes:
 

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I think Kevin, as more guys get to see and use the GRK fasteners, the idea os the screws will go away. Our state building inspectors were impressed with them...and if they wre not so expensive and it would eat up time, we would drop nails altogether for the screws.
 

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You already know I too am a GRK convert. But technically, they too are screws until you get into the lag bolt size. Not that I know right off the top pf my head what specs constitute a screw becoming a lag bolt at some certain size but I have plenty of books which could educate us real quick on the matter if I had time to crack them. Im sure you are in the same boat.
Bottom line: In a perfect world GRK would be government funded in place of the NEA and we could all use them gratis! :laughing:
 

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That statement was made for all the boneheads trying to build a house with drywall screws,not the fastners you described, as far as being too generall,i apologize, i assumed it would be a simple deduction on what or what not to use screws on,so i generalized.IE items that support very heavy loads,if nails won't suffice in come the bolts,i'd rather be safe than sorry.although they sound like good strong screws i personally think they have little use in home building or constuction,the economics alone is a big minus and its by far no quicker.
 

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That statement was made for all the boneheads trying to build a house with drywall screws,not the fastners you described, as far as being too generall,i apologize, i assumed it would be a simple deduction on what or what not to use screws on,so i generalized.IE items that support very heavy loads,if nails won't suffice in come the bolts,i'd rather be safe than sorry.although they sound like good strong screws i personally think they have little use in home building or constuction,the economics alone is a big minus and its by far no quicker.
You ever get a chance, try the screws...you will be amazed. We form concrete with them, and dab a little grease in the head...makes stripping forms easy...set doors, you can tighten or loosen the screw without wrecking it, drive them up from the underside of a double plate and get a great anchor for trusses....and yep, they are really costly, but do have their place and I use them in every home we build, and remodeling, there is no substitute.
 

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Well i understand there use in assembling forms,i too use screws on occaision for small forms ,i like to salvage the lumber for another day,i'll reuse for airconditioning slabs,chiminy footings,little stuff.i'll generally use deck screws for that.you live in truss country,i live on long island trusses aren't used here as much,i see them being used in condominium construction mostly,it does make since i suppose being the roof is the hardest part to build and cuts framing time down probably in half.i'm curious to know what the cost factor is between the two,it may be quicker but does the cost of the trusses make it more or less economical.
 

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Have one and the only time I really ever use it is for nailing shingles underneath a tight overhang when a hammer won't fit, otherwise I would much rather use a hammer when a normal nailer doesn't work,

"don't want a framing gun because the nails are hard to find around here and they are expensive."

Around here stick nails are just as cheap as loose nails, and why not just order a box of 16s and a box of 8s online or something and have them around when you need them?
 

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I haven't bought loose nailes except an occasional box of trim namils in many years. Senco gun nails are $24 a box in the city...sometimes a lottle more, sometimes less at HD or Lowes when they are baiting contractors.
 

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No offence meant wizard. I was just trying to understand what you meant as it is a subject near and dear to my heart and I wanted to make sure I didn't pass up the opportunity to learn something. :icon_wink:

Thanks for the clarification. :thumbsup:
 

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Okay, ya gotta explain this one to me. Structural repair is a very general term and can encompass thousands of scenarios with endless combinations. What do you mean when you say screws should not be used for structural repairs? I have never heard such a specific admonition used in so general a sense.
Educate me! :yes:
This generalization is mostly aimed at using large drywall screws in any type of load bearing configuration, such as header fabrication. They are brittle and not code approved for structural work of any sort, although I use them often myself and have never been called down by an inspector.
 

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When I made my post, I was addressing the fact that there are plethora code-approved structuaral screws for virtually any application you can think of. the statemnet was made that you shouldn't use screws in structural situations and this made me wonder what in the world that meant?
The use of drywall screws entered the conversation later. I would not use drywall screws in a structural application personally

When I posted my question, drywall screws being used was no where to be found in my tiny little head. I use them on drywall. I use structural screws in structural applications. Inspectors or not.
 
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