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Hi everyone,
As a novice to the wood working craft, I continuously run into questions like this that I simply haven't seen or haven't experimented with, etc.

I have the idea to build a small nightstand that mimics my current nightstand (as I only have one). The bedroom set is white, so i'm going to match it. When I have painted items like this in the past, I'd eventually end up with a paint that was tacky, even months after it was painted. I"m wondering if anyone has any experience and thoughts that might point me in the right direction. I've got a few specific questions, but any and all advice is always welcome.

1) Oil vs Latex? - I think I've never really used anything besides latex, maybe incorrectly thinking it was "the best"

2) Do you use a lacquer or poly on it? - I don't want it to be super shiny, as the other furniture is kind of matte. However I would like it to not scratch if i was going to set my glasses on it, or anything like that.

3) Does the material the cabinet is made out of matter? Most likely I planned on using pine or mdf, as it's readily available to me, not super expensive if i need to make a second one, etc.

Thanks!
Jay
 

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This recent thread will likely answer most your questions. Painting a side table is going to use the same products as painting a cabinet.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f8/wood-use-painting-cabinets-57113/#post540254

On question #3:
The top coat is only as good as the surface it's applied on. Pine is a soft wood and will continue to be a soft wood even with a hard coating on it. For instance, my wife and I made a cheap set of pine furniture for out living room when we first got married. The coffee table a few years later is littered with her lovely hand writing. Heck, we can almost just look at the table instead of needing to look at the check book for bills!:laughing: I would look for either a cheaper hardwood or a veneered plywood that is going to be a bit harder than pine.

In general: 1) generally, just personal preference 2) no need to clear coat the paint, just use the right paint 3) I recommend against pine
 

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Hi everyone,
As a novice to the wood working craft, I continuously run into questions like this that I simply haven't seen or haven't experimented with, etc.

I have the idea to build a small nightstand that mimics my current nightstand (as I only have one). The bedroom set is white, so i'm going to match it. When I have painted items like this in the past, I'd eventually end up with a paint that was tacky, even months after it was painted. I"m wondering if anyone has any experience and thoughts that might point me in the right direction. I've got a few specific questions, but any and all advice is always welcome.

1) Oil vs Latex? - I think I've never really used anything besides latex, maybe incorrectly thinking it was "the best"

2) Do you use a lacquer or poly on it? - I don't want it to be super shiny, as the other furniture is kind of matte. However I would like it to not scratch if i was going to set my glasses on it, or anything like that.

3) Does the material the cabinet is made out of matter? Most likely I planned on using pine or mdf, as it's readily available to me, not super expensive if i need to make a second one, etc.

Thanks!
Jay
Some latex paint stays sticky forever. It seems like every time the weather gets humid it re-wets the paint. For latex I would use a major label trim paint rather than some off brand. Personally I would rather use oil based paint. It may be a pain to work with and stays wet a long time while you are working it but when it's dry it stays dry and is less likely to scratch.

I don't like the concept of putting a clear finish over these type of paints. I just use a clear coating on automotive finishes. You especially don't want to put lacquer over enamel. The solvents in the lacquer are so hot it will ruin enamel. Lacquer could be put over latex but most of the lacquer in the box stores are a nitrocellulose lacquer which will yellow as it ages so if you use it over white in a couple of years it will be beige. An oil based polyurethane would do that also but yellow slower. A water based polyurethane would remain clear.

Pine and MDF both will paint fine except the MDF will need extra primer on edges. Also MDF is actually a thick sheet of paper like they make grocery sacks out of so it isn't suited for wet locations any more than the grocery sack would. I stopped using it about 15 years ago mainly because of the weight. It can make a small project weigh like lead.
 

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Pretty much what has already been suggested:

1: oil would be more durable, latex wall apint is unacceptable under any circumstances (it has a property called "blocking", things stick to it when they sit on it) but an acrylic (sometime labeled latex acrylic) is a good choice.

2:NO! once again NO!

3: I agree pine can be awfully soft, but it may still work for you. Poplar and maybe maple would be good, and a bit more durable (and quite inexpensive). Even so, go with what you're comfortable with. When using MDF you may have to do something to get the edges to finish as smooth as the surface.
 
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