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I have a customer who wants a special paint finish on a few pieces of furniture that I am making. It has a base coat of one color, then a "wipe off" glaze coat. Reminds me of the wipe off glaze cabinet finish that is getting popular around here. Anyway, besides being an insult to the piece of furniture that I am making her, this finish is unfamiliar to me. Any tips on type of paint and application of the wipe off glaze. :censored:
 

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Sorry that I don't know the first thing about this. I think though someplace like Sherwin Williams should be able to either help or point you in the right direction.
 

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I have a customer who wants a special paint finish on a few pieces of furniture that I am making. It has a base coat of one color, then a "wipe off" glaze coat. Reminds me of the wipe off glaze cabinet finish that is getting popular around here. Anyway, besides being an insult to the piece of furniture that I am making her, this finish is unfamiliar to me. Any tips on type of paint and application of the wipe off glaze. :censored:
Glazing is an updgrade on stained pieces, it adds character and depth. On painted stuff it seems kind of a waste of money for the consumer (a lot of work) but whatever. It's an art, but at the same time is rather simple and if you f up, you have the luxury of wiping down and starting all over.

Finishing schedule normally is base coat tinted CV (or precat laq, whatever), scuff w/ 220, clearcoat CV, scuff with a scotchbrite pad. wipe on glaze, brush off with a dry brush, clear topcoat, scuff 220, clear topcoat.

Some people go have additional steps and go vinyl sealer,scuff, tinted Laq, scuff, Clear Laq, scuff, glaze, vinyl sealer,scuff, clear topcoat, scuff, clear topcoat.

I'm guessing you already have this completed by now care to show the pics if you have them?

Me personally I would use a water white CV such as Resistant, as there really is no water white laq as far as I'm concerned. Even if it is called ww.

I just read this, sorry for righting scuff so many times. I really just should've said scuff w/ scotchbrite before glazing because it minimizes scratches for the glaze to hide in, and don't scuff after the glaze.
 
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