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I've been planning on getting insulation added to my shop in the near future, and I'd been thinking of doing some remodeling when that happened. But last night my insulation guy called and said "hey, I've got an opening Monday, can we do your shop then?". So yeah, you can do it, come on. I spent this morning getting everything out of the rafters (I built it with attic trusses, tomorrow I'll start getting the ground-level stuff out (it was 96F in my shop by 11:30, so I stopped then). My shop is 12x30, and I've got the one long wall that currently has my miter saw and some storage cabinets. My table saw is on the other side - in the image it's between the rollup door and that side door, and I outfeed on roller stands through the rollup door to the outside. This works fine unless it's A) cold B) rainy C) soggy because it's just rained hard D) etc. I have a heavy rolling workbench that's about 6'x2.5' that is currently living on the wall between that swinging door and the long window, same side as the table saw. The telescope equipment is still where it is, and most likely will stay there, so that back wall is occupied.

What I've been thinking about doing is moving the table saw to the opposite wall, feeding into the shop rather than out the door (roughly where the two side-by-side arrows are pointing to electrical outlets), building a table along and attached to that wall that would serve as outfeed for the table saw, and further down the wall building a miter saw station so that table can be outfeed for the table saw and side support for the miter saw. The rolling workbench would relocate to where the table saw lives now, and would become pretty much a dedicated assembly/finishing table. I'll probably work a benchtop drill press in there somewhere at some point. I think this will work out well for me - I'm really tired of not having a good outfeed situation for the table saw, and I'm really tired of not having good wide support for the miter saw. I figure I've got to allow at least 8' between the table saw and miter saw; that shouldn't be a problem. I'm wondering about the width of the outfeed part. I've assumed it needs to be as wide as the table saw, but I don't want the table to always be that wide, so maybe a folding surface? Or maybe just some arms that swing out? I don't cut sheets of plywood that often, but that's partly because I haven't had a good outfeed setup. So I'm looking for ideas on how to handle the TS outfeed. And the material for the top - what should that be? Melamine? Just a smooth sanded plywood?

And I guess before any of that - is this going to work out the way I hope? Am I trying to get too much sugar for a dime?

Thanks,
Harry

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My shop is 10x30. my rolling workbench only rolls on rare occasions. Like when I cant get something past the table saw.
My outfeed table is also rolling. With wheels down it is around 1/8" lower than table saw. with the narrow end on the outfeed end of the saw, I can do long pieces. For shorter pieces, I lay the outfeed table alng the length of the table saw so wider boads can get support.
Normally my outfeed table is on the retractable wheels, more or less in the middle of the floor. That is where I use it most. If I have several pieces of plywood coming in, I roll my workbench in front of the table saw and lying along the length of the table saw. And the assembly table along the length of the shop. I slide the plywood out of the truck on top of the workbench and continue sliding it across the top of the table saw and onto the assembly table. I roll the assembly table to the rear of the shop and slide the plywood off the assembly table, one sheet at a time. Then stand the ply up vertically and lay it on top of the bottom pad of the plywood rack and push it up against the plywood rack in a vertical position.
I find it much easier to store all my wood vertically.
 
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