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WELL FELLAS LOOKS LIKE THE JIG IS UP !

Where did I hear that saying.....was it Elliot Ness in the Untouchables?

My woodworking friend was summoned to come over ( hah he though he was on vacation this week) and after 3 hrs of trading insults , leveling ,chalk stringing, notching, leveling some more, trading more insults we got it done.
The boat jig that is.
The jig is anchored to the floor with cement spikes in 3 places.

Whoa almost deadnuts level across the frames at the keel notches.

Next I'll position the forms exactly and block them in and then make the keel and 4 battens.
That is if the grass stops growing ...hard to keep up with the rain we're having.
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
All 3 boats I built were Glen designs. That was almost 40 years ago. Their blue prints and actual size prints for difficult pieces are the greatest. Every so often I still pull up their website and look at some of their boats. Man I wish I had to space to build one. I used mainly Philippine mahogany and marine plywood. Two I built myself and the 3rd I was helping another woodworker.
Very cool ..do you remember which ones you built?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
@Tree Hugger, are you keeping track of the time you are spending on the build? It would be interesting to see how much time you put into it.
Nah after 45 years punching a clock I'm done keeping track of time .
300 hrs comes to mind reading of other builds .
Retired so it should be ready for sea trials by next summer without breaking a sweat.
 

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Got out in my shop early before the sun got to intense.
All lumber is rough cut so it takes longer to get it were I want it to be.
The keel and the 4 battens/stringers are cut ,they set proud and will get hand planed in .
5 degree deadrise so the keel will come to a point in the middle.
They will just get screwed in place for now once the chines are made installed and I'm satisfied with how things come out then comes the glue.
I'm using Mas Epoxy with slow hardener the same as I used on my kayak build.
Screws are silicon bronze and are used mainly for positioning , the strength is in the Epoxy.
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
So, like Gibbs, will you put this all together an then have to use TV magic to get it out of your basement?
No magic but I will have to have my thinking cap screwed on tight.
Boat looks small and large at the same time.
Small compared to what I had decades ago and large when I think about snaking it out of here.
 

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Nah after 45 years punching a clock I'm done keeping track of time .
300 hrs comes to mind reading of other builds .
Retired so it should be ready for sea trials by next summer without breaking a sweat.
Ok. Are you keeping track of what you spend? I'd be interested in that. I figure any estimates out there are pretty much out of touch with today's prices.

Maybe I missed it in an earlier post, what are you planning to power it with?

I've seen and heard about Glen L boats and plans but never look into them. My son started collecting outboards when was about 12 (22 now). He has a nice 35 hp Evinrude Lark that would look great on the style you are building (in my opinion).

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
People are powering with 25hp and up .
That Evinrude should work perfect and the boat is designed for the light 2 strokes of that era.

Plenty are using 4 strokes though and I have a 40 hp short shaft Tohatsu on order with trim/tilt .
Hard to find short shaft and trim/tilt in that power size.

Wood roughly $2200 (Honduras Mahogany) but you can save going to a lesser Mahogany (Philippine) or even more using white oak.
$10.00 bd ft vs $7.50 bd ft vs $5.00 bd ft.
Plywood need to stay the same either Hydrotek or Okoume with the BS 1088 marine spec.

I'll post more accurate figures later but I'm estimating around 10K with finding a used trailer.
You could certainly do it cheaper ..a good used engine helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Still making chips.
First pic is getting my Bow stem lined up with the center of the boat.
Scratching head till I remembered a rotating laser level I picked up when I installed the drop ceiling in the basement.
Lightly tapped a few nails on the center of the keel and stem.
Laser has a mount for rotating a vertical line.
Once the line lights up all the nails the stem gets screwed down to the jig.
A video would have been pretty cool here.

Built most of my chines which need to start at 16' ( then cut to fit) so scarf joints are needed.
My longest boards are 12' .
Do both pieces at the same time and the angles will match.

Fairing the boat is very time consuming lots of hand planing ..lots done and lots to go.



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Bet it was fun trying to prevent movement when clamping those scarf joints during glue-up. The results are very nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Ok had some head scratching on the chines and some setbacks and walking away for a while.
Chines are going to be laminated in two and three layers along with some steam applied where needed.
Here's where a jig would be great in steaming as you could allow for some spring back .
top ones are two pc and second layer just glued.
Lower chines are steamed and screwed for now, in a few days they will get epoxied in.
Steamer is a camping tea pot on a 1 burner stove with a dehumidifier hose stuck in.
Steaming bag is food sealer bag just cut to length...it works.

Mas epoxy with slow hardener works well and gives enough working time.

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Lots of time consuming elbow grease doing the fairing of the frame for good fit up.
Have some fine tuning yet to go and it's nice to finally see the plywood skin on.
They will come off 1 or 2 times more for final tweaking of transitions between joints then epoxied in.
Hope to make some real progress this month.
Plywood is 6MM Hydrotek .
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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Feeling my age today after yesterdays marathon.
We got the hull glassed, 6oz glass overall with an additional 4oz on the very bottom( using a little over 1 gal of resin with 1/2 gal hardener 2-1 ratio).
Bow point will get additional layers and feathered in at a later date.
2 guys with squeegees and brushes and 1 mixing and using heat gun for air bubbles.
Room temp at 68f and 6oz wasn't wetting out as fast as we needed so ran an electric heater on the epoxy containers to warm it up some .
Using MAS low visc epoxy with slow hardener. It's very low odor but we still mask up .
We're used to it and like the extended working time but when you got some ground to cover you have to keep moving.
Small batches of anywhere from 12oz to 24oz at a time as it will tack up and even go exothermic in a container
if you wait to long.
If you wait 2 to 3 or so hours between coats the next coat will grip and no sanding will be needed between coats.
Three coats of epoxy overall.
Full cure in 24 hrs.

Next step is sanding with my 5" orbital hookup up to the shop vac with hepa filter.
I'll start with 80 grit to lightly smoothout the overlaps ect then switch to 120.
Then a whole lot of hand sanding .
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I'm about 3/4 done on the sanding. Start with the 3M Sandblaster disks on a 5" orbital till you've hit all the high spots and are relatively smooth.
Then finish with a large block sander and homemade longboard.
The longboard is flexible to follow the shape of the boat.
Make sure to stop at the first sign of the glass print.
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There are some minor craters and pinholes that will get faired with fairing compound.
Then sanded and then prime paint.
After prime it will be easier to see any corrections to be made with the fiaring compound.
The hull here will get painted , if it was to be varnished I would touch up low spots with more epoxy.
Top side will be glassed and epoxied and several coats of varnish foe UV protection of the epoxy.
 

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Wow this is a mighty project, fair play to you for tackling it and thanks for sharing all the progress pictures, fascinating to see a project this size coming together.
What is the cost of maine ply where you are? Here in Ireland it is crazy money, changing price every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Wow this is a mighty project, fair play to you for tackling it and thanks for sharing all the progress pictures, fascinating to see a project this size coming together.
What is the cost of maine ply where you are? Here in Ireland it is crazy money, changing price every day.
Thanks.
I'm using 1/4 Hydrotek BS 1088 Marine plywood. @ $75.00 a sheet of 4X8 and that's a quantity discount price.
Ha just checked it went up 10% from 6 months ago.
That's one of the reasons you don't see many wood boats , time consuming also.
Wood prices are bonkers here also.
Here's where I bought my wood
 
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