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We had some bad weather here in the lower side of Louisiana this past week and a little tornado twisted off my Ornamental pear tree. So i have cut it up in a few pieces about 18" long and plan on turning it into some candle stands. Anyone ever use Pear tree wood??
 

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image-1539400710.jpg

Turned this a month ago from a Bradford pear that came down in a friends yard. It's fairly nice to turn green but on a few items I've done it does want to warp so plan ahead for that
 

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I have used the bradford pear...pretty wood but very wet. That is a bowl from it as my avatar

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We had some bad weather here in the lower side of Louisiana this past week and a little tornado twisted off my Ornamental pear tree. So i have cut it up in a few pieces about 18" long and plan on turning it into some candle stands. Anyone ever use Pear tree wood??
I haven't used much myself but everything I've read says it's a favorite of turners and particularly carvers because of the smooth, even grain.
 

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Handyman, I bought a lathe and got into this hobby because of a big bradford pear I needed to cut down. It's really nice to turn green but it is prone to splitting as it dries. I am still learning patience and drying technique. The wood in my tree was light but with nice grain definition and some dark heart wood.

I think we are neighbors. I'm from Orange, TX.

Here is a pear bowl that cracked during drying....sorry, all my pear has met this fate thus far.



And here is some lumber I had sawn. I had the lumber dried in a solar kiln and it cupped quite a bit but should be fun to work with. The piece in the foreground is planed, sanded, and coated with teak oil.

 

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You could put a stone inlay in the cracks...just put some tape on the back side to prevent it from falling out of the crack. Also you could cut the pith out and seal a bunch of chunks with anchorseal on the end grain. This is before turning but the chunks may have to sit for a bit to dry out a little

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John, If there is still enough thickness in the plate, I would recommend reworking the bottom to make the diameter of the foot larger. While the diameter is about right for a bowl, a plate needs to have a larger diameter foot for stability.
 

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Thanks for the note Bill...yes I think there is still enough thickness to run the base off and turn a wider one. I may have to wait until I get a pneumatic chuck so I can hang on to the finished side.
 

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Thanks for the note Bill...yes I think there is still enough thickness to run the base off and turn a wider one. I may have to wait until I get a pneumatic chuck so I can hang on to the finished side.
It would be even easier and more convenient to do with a jam chuck because you could remove the piece to check the thickness and then re-center it much easier than if you were using a vacuum chuck. It certainly is more convenient to work from the tailstock side. The headstock side is often a bit cramped for working space especially if the lathe has a large headstock.
 
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