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My old 6 in pneumatic sander needs replaced, I want electric with dust collection.
You will NOT be happy! If you are set up for pneumatic and have used pneumatic, there is not a single electric sander on the planet that will make you happy. Heck, I even have every Festool sander made, and given to me for free, and I won't use them over my standard Dynabrades.
 

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Termite
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You will NOT be happy! If you are set up for pneumatic and have used pneumatic, there is not a single electric sander on the planet that will make you happy. Heck, I even have every Festool sander made, and given to me for free, and I won't use them over my standard Dynabrades.
Those of us who have use them know this , but he may have compressor problems or didn't have a good model sander and is ready to go electric.
 

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Cabinetmaker
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My old 6 in pneumatic sander needs replaced, I want electric with dust collection. 5 inch is OK, but what is with this velcro hook and loop sanding disk option? Aren't they expensive? Please suggest a brand and model for home shop use, any price.
If you decide to buy the DeWalt ROS, here’s a thought. To use up your existing non-hook/loop 6" pads, why not consider the 5" adaptor that I referred to earlier, providing it will adapt to the ROS model.

Make a circle/cut template from 3/8 or 1/2" stock. Cut a 5" square to start with, and make an “X” by drawing a line, corner to corner, to locate the center (you know the process). Drill a small hole in the center. Countersink the hole bottom, to accept a screw for a small lift knob. Then, cut out the circular disc template with a bandsaw. Attach a small knob handle to the center with a screw, and drill a small hole at the edge of the template for desired wall-hanging. You can use a thinner stock, but 3/8" minimum gives you extra thickness for the knob-handle screw’s countersink.

To use the template: With a cutting mat below, place the template over the face of disc (backing still attached). Centering isn’t important because you will have enough scrap excess, after trimming. With slight downward pressure applied, use a sharp utility knife to away the excess paper on the outside of the template. Results is a 5" ready-to-use sanding disc.

Sounds like a lot of work, but it may help to use your huge supply of unused sanding discs. I’d cut some up on days that you are waiting for finish drying-times – and store them until needed.

Sure hope this helps!

- Bob
 

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You will NOT be happy! If you are set up for pneumatic and have used pneumatic, there is not a single electric sander on the planet that will make you happy. Heck, I even have every Festool sander made, and given to me for free, and I won't use them over my standard Dynabrades.
I sorta agree. I have a National Detroit sander that will out sand most any sander, but it makes the shop a disaster. Zero dust collection!
 

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I'm currently using a Hyper Tough sander from Walmart. It is dirt cheap and does a good job sanding. It's just a little uncomfortable to operate. It's a little too tall and the top is a little too big for my hands. I used to use a Porter Cable Quicksand. I really liked that sander but they quit making them.
 

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I have had the Bosch GEX33-6N (6”) for about 20-years and it remains a fantastic tool. It has very good dust collection (must use perforated discs for this to work), has adjustable speed, and is DA. I also have a Bosch 3x21 belt sander, and the DA can be almost as aggressive as the belt sander, but easier to control and generally yields a better result due to the wider 6” pad. It is a beast of a sander.

The perforated discs last much longer than non-perforated ones because the dust gets sucked away and the airflow helps keep the grit cooler and therefore last longer. You may be able to find or make a PSA platen with the 6-hole pattern in it (copy the Velcro one by drilling holes in the PSA one), and then you’d be all set. The trick is that you would need make yourself a jig to punch the 6 holes in each sanding disc — my Makita palm sander has a metal plate with 4 spikes on it that align with the holes in the platen for punching the sanding paper.
 

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I own two Bosch sanders and both are outstanding. I've used the inexpensive ROS20VSK for many years now and it's great for smaller projects and if you need a light weight sander. I recently picked up the Bosch GET75-6N which I call "the beast". There is a switch on it to change it from random orbital to direct drive rotation which really removes material fast. Both sanders when hooked up to my 14 gallon ridgid vacuum have incredible dust collection with Mirka Autonet discs. The GET75-6N has many reviews placing it above many festool sanders costing 2-3x more.
 

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I've owned a Mirka Ceros and highly prefer it over an air Dynabrade. They sand about the same but the Ceros is much easier to handle. Unfortunately they discontinued the Ceros because it had a transformer block and people didn't like that. Now the replacement is the Deros and it's the same sander but it's bigger than the Ceros. More clunky in my opinion. It's been going for more than 5 years and sanding is the bane of my existence. So I do a lot of sanding.

I would get the Deros if my Ceros crapped out.
 
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