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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a very small space in which I would like to put a standing desk. I have very limited tools (drill, saw), space, and experience. Because of this, I want to try a wall mounted desk. I was thinking I could pull off something like this rather easily, though something like this might be a little more functional.

My question is, which method of wall mounting would yield the sturdiest final product? Is a proper wall mounted desk significantly weaker than a free standing desk? The desk will likely see a lot of use. Textbooks, computer monitors, and myself leaning on it. The desk will likely be 20" or so deep and 50" wide.

Can I get away with wall brackets such as those in the link? Should I build brackets out of dimensional lumber? I only have space to extend about 15" below the tabletop (I plan on putting some stuff under the desk), so a full 20" right angle isosceles triangle bracket isn't an option. Or is wall mounted not the way to go when looking for a safely sturdy desk?
 

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Have you considered something like this...



Using a 3/4" back as previously stated, and attached to the studs in the wall and making braces on each end instead of in the middle, you could prolly use it for a chair/bed !!!!:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you very much for the feedback. Below is a picture I will use to illustrate some of my questions. It shows two different design ideas. Please forgive my complete lack of Sketchup skills. Very rough concept stuff.

Click here for picture (sorry, it was too big and stretched the page so I put it in a link).

@cabinetman: Thanks for the welcome! I do not understand the purpose of the plywood back/french cleat. On the desk to the right I have highlighted in red what I think you mean by a plywood back. Does that somehow provide support?

@Mission: I won't be able to add a hutch to the top of the desk (it will be right under a windowsill) but I don't think that was the point you were trying to make. :p I like the idea of triangular supports (left desk in the picture). They will only be able to extend ~15" below the desk at most, will that provide enough support? Something strong enough to sit on is the ideal, although I do not plan to sit on it.
 

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The desk in the second photo is a nice simple design. It's basically a divided box.

Use 3/4 plywood for the entire project.

I'd be leary of using a french cleat (Rambunctious kids? Enthusiastic pets? Klutzy party guests?)

Instead, build a 3/4" deep recess into the back of the box. Cut a 3/4" plywood cleat to fit the recess.

Then attach the cleat to the wall at every available stud.

Slip the box recess over the cleat and attach by screwing into the cleat through the top of the box.

Countersink those screws, putty the holes..

Stain or paint finish?
 

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This is attached to the wall with a few piano hinges. It can be folded up against the wall when I need more space. The leg is held in by gravity.
 

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Your Triangular braces in your first drawing will be more than adequate. You could even hinge them and make the desk capable of folding down and out of the way.
 
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