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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
someone commented on my thread on chainsaws saying they used “full chisel chains”, on their saw, can someone explain these and why you would use these. Also would like to know if there are other types of chains available.
Thanks
Bert
 

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This video will explain the difference between the yellow and green Stihl chains, or full chisel vs safety chains.

Since we own about 7 chainsaws, accumulated over many years of burning firewood, I have learned how to sharpen my own chains.
There are jigs, and machines and Stihl makes a nifty file holder, I have pretty much used a rotary grinder for chains that has a collet that accept the 3 sizes of stones made for this purpose. It was made by Craftsman years ago, but any die grinder with that small collet will also work.
You Tube has many videos of sharpening your chains, so check that out also:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This video will explain the difference between the yellow and green Stihl chains, or full chisel vs safety chains.

Since we own about 7 chainsaws, accumulated over many years of burning firewood, I have learned how to sharpen my own chains.
There are jigs, and machines and Stihl makes a nifty file holder, I have pretty much used a rotary grinder for chains that has a collet that accept the 3 sizes of stones made for this purpose. It was made by Craftsman years ago, but any die grinder with that small collet will also work.
You Tube has many videos of sharpening your chains, so check that out also.
Perfect, thanks.
I cut mostly oak, so I will probably stay with the green
 

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The full chisel just means the chain is fast cutting. Just cross cutting logs for like firewood it would probably be the best. If though you wanted a smoother cut use a standard blade. If though you were to try to rip the log like you were sawing lumber they make a ripping chain which is ground at a different angle.
 

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google chain saw chain types and do some reading. do you have the manual for your saw? it typically calls out chain options to choose from.

there are a number of considerations that can suit your needs, pitch, gauge, and profile. pitch and gauge are mostly saw specific, but yu can go a little both ways from the recommendation. profile are more task specific.

cross cutting oak - full chisel wil be fastest, but not necessarily the safest.

get into the habit of doing a tuneup to your saw every time you take it out. check/blow out the air filter, check chain tension, touch up chain (sharpen), and top off fuel and bar oil. things that you don't want to find out you should have done before you got out there... btdt :^(
 

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7 chainsaws? wnt collects saws: chain or table it doesn't matter 😂

i heated exclusively with wood for 15 years and cut all my wood with the same chainsaw
carry this bad boy in your back pocket in the woods, once the saw quits throwing big chips
hit it with a $10 file, you can sharpen a chain quicker than you can swap chains
(or walk back to the truck for another chain saw)

you can file the chain to what ever specs you want: chisel, safety, rip

https://www.amazon.com/Oregon-25894-32-Inch-Chainsaw-Guide/dp/B00004RA78

 

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I wondered about sharpening a chain before, so here's a good time to ask. My experience with a chain saw is minimal, and I've never sharpened a chain. What happens to the metal particles that come off when you file the chain? Don't they stick to the chain because of the oil on it? Wouldn't they eat up the bar and sprocket on the saw?
 

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The down side to hand sharpening a chain is most people will not sharpen a chain the same on both sides. No fault of the operator it's just a fact of life. For that reason I purchased a grinder for that purpose. As a former Stihl Tech I just find it easier to carry two or three sharp chains with me. But, that is just me. YMMV

Ken
 

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i never had the problem with not being the same grind on both sides. using the guide i posted above is easy to line up, match the line on the guide and angle the file a tad. as long as the tad is consistent it'll be fine. the guide keeps the depth even. i never even had a 2nd chain to install if i had an issue, back then money was tight and i was building a house. later on, when cash flowed a little freer, it made no sense not to sharpen them. i can no longer use a chainsaw, but i do keep a couple of my neighbors saws sharp. easy peasy
 

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The down side to hand sharpening a chain is most people will not sharpen a chain the same on both sides. No fault of the operator it's just a fact of life. For that reason I purchased a grinder for that purpose. As a former Stihl Tech I just find it easier to carry two or three sharp chains with me. But, that is just me. YMMV

Ken
To avoid unequal sides, I swap the saw around in the vise, so I can get better access to both sides.
I use a Craftsman chain saw grinder like this die grinder, only shorter:
Line Gas Cylinder Pipe Metal


Like this without the "guide". Mine probably had a guide, but I ditched it so I could see better.
Hand Automotive tire Automotive lighting Cylinder Bicycle part


I use those small "dremel" chain saw sharpening stone that fit into the gullets on the chain. There are 3 sizes for the different pitches of chains. The stones are 7/32", 3/16" and 5/32" in diameter.
 

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Some of what is said here is correct but a true Chisel chain is square ground not round. It can be filed round but for best performance it should be square. A round filed chain the file should always enter the chain from the back of the cutter, a square file comes in from the front and has a downward angle. Also once you use a "grinder" on a chain it hardens the cutter and you won't have good results trying to file sharpen it again.
Here is a good write up on it. Scroll down to the square filing part if you are interested in how it is done.
Sharpening Chainsaw Chain | Oregon Products
 

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Some of what is said here is correct but a true Chisel chain is square ground not round. It can be filed round but for best performance it should be square. A round filed chain the file should always enter the chain from the back of the cutter, a square file comes in from the front and has a downward angle. Also once you use a "grinder" on a chain it hardens the cutter and you won't have good results trying to file sharpen it again.
Here is a good write up on it. Scroll down to the square filing part if you are interested in how it is done.
Sharpening Chainsaw Chain | Oregon Products
So, are saying if you start with a new "full chisel" chain it will have a square angle on the vertical a top cutting edges?
I never paid attention, but I'll check mine out.
Once you use a round stone or round file have you essentially changed it from full chisel to semi-chisel?
NOPE, see video below.
I only use the stones, so I can't verify your claim that it "work hardens" the tooth, so a file will no longer work.
I'll wager in my case, I don't generate any heat with just a few quick strokes of the high speed stone, enough to harden the steel.
I'll also run a file on a few teeth to see if it "skips" or removes metal.

This video explains that it's the shape of the tooth, square vs rounded, not the shape of the ground or filed surface that determines whether it's a full or semi chisel chain. He also explains why a full chisel with it's very pointed sharp corner will dull easily if it strikes any sand or dirt.:
 

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All of the guys falling timber here in the 70's when I worked in saw shops used a square grind on a chisel bit chain.. We never considered a round corner chain a chisle although you could grind one round. The grinders we used to sharpen them with would harden the cutters. You could tell one that had been ground you took a file to it becasue the file would slide through and not dig in. It also would dull the file.
 
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