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Hello all!

Okay. So I've stumbled upon yet another classic piece of equipment in my immediate area, and I'm wondering what you all think. It's an Oliver bandsaw, model 192, 18"(not sure what max resaw capacity is yet) with a 1hp @ 220 direct drive motor. Looks like it runs, though I'm not sure how smoothly(I have yet to visit in person). The current owner is only the second, and he has been sitting on it for a decade, putting off a full restore(which I would love to undertake). My first question is, of course, who here has direct experience with any of the 192s, particularly the "round-top" model? What should I watch out for when I actually have an opportunity to visit? The owner is pretty keen to sell it to me specifically, as he wants it to have a good home and hopefully a "nostalgia" restoration. I currently have a "chiwainese" 14" bandsaw with added riser block, and honestly, it serves me just fine, so this purchase is not necessarily, well, necessary. It's an upgrade in quality, I think, but no, I do not NEED it. For those of you who have used one, what were the strengths? Weaknesses? Quirks? Difficult parts to find? Any and all information and opinions(especially opinions) are greatly appreciated. I've been lurking around the OWWM forums, but haven't gotten up the nerve to ask them yet(I'm still new to this, and those folks intimidate me a bit), but that is my next step. Oh, and the owner is asking 400, which compared to the 2 or 3 operational examples I've seen seems like a fair price. Most of the work needed appears to be cosmetic(and yes, I know how deep that rabbit hole can go). If I'm way off, please let me know. I don't want to get in over my head. Thanks in advance!

Camden
 

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I don't have experience with the band saw. I wouldn't have any reservations in buying Oliver machinery. They are a reputable company. What you have to keep in mind is the old machinery is usually built far better than what is made today. It might need the attention of a machinist but once put back to working order would more than likely last you the rest of your life for home shop use without needing any further repairs. Unlike new machinery that is made with plastic parts and aluminum that break down often.

I believe the company is still in business however you would have to contact them about parts for an older model. http://www.olivermachinery.net/index.php?node=about-oliver
 

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No experience with the 192 directly but some things to look for in any older industrial bandsaw include 1) figure on replacing the bearings in both wheels and the motor. Finding replacements isn't necessarily hard but their cost can add up. You will almost certainly need a puller to to remove the top and bottom wheels. 2) Check the tires and figure on replacing those as well. 3) The table trunnions on these older saws tend to be massive and are probably not cracked but it doesn't hurt to look them over. While you're at it check the teeth on any gearing for tilting the table for damaged or missing teeth. This could get expensive to repair or replace. 4) If a belt driven saw you may well want to replace the belts. 5) Whether belt driven or direct drive, clean out the motor when you replace the motor bearings. You will probably be surprised at the amount of gunk that accumulated over the year. 6) Make sure all the parts of the guides are there. 7) If the previous owner was contemplating restoring the saw but didn't finish he may have removed some parts while he was full of gumption. Make sure you ask for any parts removed and stored away. Also ask for any manuals and paperwork. 8) As far as the motor being 3 phase, that shouldn't be a problem. A Variable Frequency Device (VFD) for a 1 horse motor isn't all that much and you'll end up with a infinitely variable speed saw! Here's what you need for $127
Finally, the web site that Woodnthings mentioned will prove to be an excellent source of information and advise. Make sure you post questions there if you are unsure of anything. By the way, be prepared for plenty of "You Suck" comments if you tell them you picked this saw up for $400. That's all I got.
 
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