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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to woodworking and getting machines ready to build my kids some Christmas presents. In my barn I found an old Craftsman table saw model 103.23823 looks like it is at least 30 years old. The motor (GE induction 1 1/2hp) for the saw had a cut cord so I replaced it with a cord that went to a lamp and when I plugged her in it hummed and then popped the power surge on the power chord. Doesn't feel seized as I can spin the shaft effortlessly.

Any experience with this or ideas would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks, Jack
 

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I am new to woodworking and getting machines ready to build my kids some Christmas presents. In my barn I found an old Craftsman table saw model 103.23823 looks like it is at least 30 years old. The motor (GE induction 1 1/2hp) for the saw had a cut cord so I replaced it with a cord that went to a lamp and when I plugged her in it hummed and then popped the power surge on the power chord. Doesn't feel seized as I can spin the shaft effortlessly.

Any experience with this or ideas would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks, Jack
I would completly replace the cord. If you do not feel comfortable doing it yourself, find an electrician to do it for you.
I would also have the electrician check the motor itself for a short, or it may just be very dirty on the inside of the motor. It probably is full of dust and sawdust.
If the blade turns the the motor is not froze either. It sounds like a short to me.
 

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Keep in mind that a 1-1/2 hp motor probably pulls 15 amps during the start, and you used a lamp cord that may be 18 gauge wire, which will not carry the load...I repeat, not carry the load. The cord needs to be at least a 12 gauge, heavy duty cord to pull the load when starting and in a heavy cut.

You don't indicate where you are from, but chances are there is an appliance shop, tool repair, or even a Sears Service Center.....they can check the motor before you invest the bucks on the cord.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. I think I will replace the chord myself with a higher gauge and see what happens. As old as it is I don't want to invest to much money into it.

I also forgot to note that when I plugged the engine in and it hummed I could tap the shaft and it would spin slowly.
 

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Dumb question on my end, but here goes...is this a 110/220 motor ? Sounds like it may be one that can be wired either way and it is wired 220 and you are trying to run it on 110.

I also forgot to note that when I plugged the engine in and it hummed I could tap the shaft and it would spin slowly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
definitely not a dumb question it is a 110/220 motor. I assumed since the ripped cord only connected in two places that it was 110. I am pretty ignorant of 220 as I haven't used anything at that voltage
 

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I agree,

you need a bigger cord, also probably a cleaning these motors seem to run forever,, I have another idea you may need to check as well as darens suggestion,

I just cleaned my "old" craftsman saw up the other day , I put it all back together and had started it, it hummed and wouldnt spin,, I said what i just used it yesterday ands the day before etc,,,,,,,
looked it over again, nothing binding ,,huh,, same thing,, well :eek: come to find out one of the wires on a starting capacitator had come off, plugged it on, turned it on and whirled.... you may wantt o check that capacitator, as these motors pull alot of power at start up,,. good luck welcome to the world of sawdust,
 

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This sounds obvious, too. But you mentioned you weren't used to 240...
There's probably a 120/240 conversion sticker on the inside of the motor's electric cap, for a quick check.
 

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Hopefully that's the case

Since you can tell the operating voltage by the location of L 1 and L2 from the diagram. Where was the saw used before you got it? In an industrial shop or home shop? I doubt if a home shop had 220V 30 years ago, but one never knows. :thumbsup: bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Clarionflyer i couldn't find a conversion sticker on the motor.

woodnthings I found the table saw in the barn and the motor was mounted to the wall in my garage to operate the garage door but he never finished the job before he died. For what it's worth the engine was next to a 110 outlet.

Daren It may not have been wired right because the cord he put on it was also the wrong gauge.

This afternoon I am putting on the new cord I picked up and clean out the engine. Again thanks for taking the time to reply
 

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Old Craftsman saw

Your table saw, produced between the early 40s and mid 60s was made by the King-Seely Corporation. I'm guessing it is from around the end of WWII. You may find a users manual on OWWM.com, or at least one similar. It seems the model numbers changed every time there was even a tiny change in construction. Good Luck with it, and
enjoy using a good saw.

GerryB
 

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If it hums then if its an induction motor the chances are the starter capacitor is faulty. Chances are if you use a heavier wire and fuse it will not fix it, get a new cap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Finally got two new capacitors in the mail today (real hard to find 460 mfd capacitors). When I plugged her in she started right up! Thanks for the thorough advice I was given and look forward to contributing myself to this forum.
 

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I had to replace the motor on my old craftsman TS after 26 years.
 

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Could be wired for 220v.

Sounds like something that happened to me when someone had mistakenly wired a 115v. plug onto a 220v. motor. It just hummed. Check the voltage on the tags on the motor.


I am new to woodworking and getting machines ready to build my kids some Christmas presents. In my barn I found an old Craftsman table saw model 103.23823 looks like it is at least 30 years old. The motor (GE induction 1 1/2hp) for the saw had a cut cord so I replaced it with a cord that went to a lamp and when I plugged her in it hummed and then popped the power surge on the power chord. Doesn't feel seized as I can spin the shaft effortlessly.

Any experience with this or ideas would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks, Jack
 
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