Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an old blade planer that I am getting ready to replace. Need one with a built in vacuum attachment so I decided to get a new one. That got me to wondering if it would be feasible or worthwhile to try to convert the planer to a drum sander by removing the blades and wrapping the drum with sandpaper?

If there is a thread where this is covered please let me know so I can read about it.

Thanks in advance for any advice, opinions, or thoughts on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
You say you need one with a built in vacuum so I assuming the chips are bad but just think of what all that dust would be like if it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
While I seen info on building a drum sander from scratch, most things I read about converting a planer aren't very positive. Note that I've never tried it, so everything I have is hear say. But I do have a drum sander, and I notice the drum seems to run much slower than the cutterhead on a planer (problem#2, after the dust thing that parker mentioned). Also you'll need (or should have) a variable speed feed. Then consider the work load on a drum sander is more than it is on a planer, and you may be burning the motor out very quickly. It might be an interesting attempt if you don't want to sell the old planer. But keep some of those points in mind as you decide.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,569 Posts
Exactly

You say you need one with a built in vacuum so I assuming the chips are bad but just think of what all that dust would be like if it works.
A drum sander is a dust generator. :yes:

There are 2 ways to attach the sandpaper. On the large machines there are clips at the side with spring loaded hold downs. The paper must be bought on rolls and wound on a diagonal starting with a thin sliver. I also wrap the ends with nylon packing tape.

The second way I know is using hook and loop back paper and the corresponding material cemented to the drum. Same spiral winding is required and the tape on the ends.

Both of my drum sanders have a variable speed feed AND a platen the moves like a treadmill, NOT a pressure feed system like a planer. You Tube has several shop built sanders without a moving feed belt, so that way will work also. You may have to disable the feed rollers and pressure bar on the planer. As far as rotational speed on the drum, 2200 RPMs. http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0459P

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=shop+built+drum+sander&sm=3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Is the planer equipped with an induction or a universal motor (brushes)? Might be able to slow the drum speed with a router speed control if it is a universal motor.
Just a thought.
You will still have a dust prob, and attaching paper to the drum would be tough because of the blade slots.
Bill
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,569 Posts
The blade slots could be filled with wooden strips. Then turn the thing on and sand them flush with a block with sandpaper attached, cleaning up the drum at the same time. I still think the feeding issue is the buga boo. My sanders don't like anymore than a 1/64" pass or so. ...squealing and burning are sounds that I don't like to hear or smell. I use 2 grits on the dual drum to help with that also. You just have to be patient. :thumbdown:
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
I have an old blade planer that I am getting ready to replace. Need one with a built in vacuum attachment so I decided to get a new one. That got me to wondering if it would be feasible or worthwhile to try to convert the planer to a drum sander by removing the blades and wrapping the drum with sandpaper?

Thanks in advance for any advice, opinions, or thoughts on this.
Since you asked for opinions, my opinion is this is a bad idea.

As others mentioned drum sanders make a LOT of dust.

The biggest problems which come to mind for the planer conversion are :
a) The planer head may rotate too fast, as someone else mentioned. I have a Performax 16/32. The drum is direct drive from the 1725 rpm motor, but it also has variable feed rate which I feel is critical.
b) Drum sanders create a lot of heat. If the head rotates too much and the feed rate is too fast, the paper will soon gum up, creating streaks which will burn the wood.
c) Since the planer head was not designed to hold the paper, you may find it difficult to just use tape to hold the paper onto the head. There will be a lot of friction between the wood and the planer head

If you want a small drum sander, I think you are better off purchasing one like this Grizzly 10in unit.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Drum-Sander/G0716
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everyone. The vacuum on the planer was to keep me from having to manually sweep up all the shavings more than anything else. The dust from a sander is something I hadn't thought about. I will just wait a few months, save my money, and buy a drum sander with vacuum and not have to worry about it.

Thanks again,

Randy
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top