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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Continuing to flog a dead horse.....

Re: runout you have to check arbor, too. A lousy machine can make a good blade look bad.
And I would think a lousy machine could make a lousy blade look even worse. My point was, that I found 0.002" difference in runout between my HF blade and my Freud blade, using same arbor and same setup. Don't know how significant that 0.002" difference is - but question if it shows this particular HF blade has a serious runout problem.
 

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What that amount if runout it’s fine and your saw is fine too.

The quality & amount of the carbide along with tooth geometry separates the good from bad. IOW will the HF Chinese steel prove itself? I wouldn’t hold my breath?

That said, one I’d the lousiest blades I’ve ever used was Vermont American. Maybe they're made in China.........LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
The quality & amount of the carbide along with tooth geometry separates the good from bad. IOW will the HF Chinese steel prove itself? I wouldn’t hold my breath?

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So far I've done about 10 cuts - a couple of rips and the rest cross cuts. All smooth and almost effortless. At my current rate of activity the blade will prove it's worth by about the year 2030. I'll report back.

BTW, my saw is a 1970's era Craftsman Radial Arm Saw - so discussions of blade runout vs. arbor runout/saw alignment issues and relevance to performance in Cabinet Saws are all relative.
 

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And I would think a lousy machine could make a lousy blade look even worse. My point was, that I found 0.002" difference in runout between my HF blade and my Freud blade, using same arbor and same setup. Don't know how significant that 0.002" difference is - but question if it shows this particular HF blade has a serious runout problem.
Thanks for your work to find that runout. Most of use appreciate what you found, while others just run their mouth.
I am also using my HF blades on my 70’s Craftsman table saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Got the old Freud blade sharpened by the guy recommended by the Rockler folks. He picked it up and dropped it off. $22.80 for a 40T carbide tipped blade. Based on his invoice and description of his pick up/delivery route, it's not the "one-man" shop I was thinking (he has a number of industrial accounts).

Blade looks pretty decent - I'll find out for sure when I use it. In the meantime, I've still got the HF blade installed and it is still cutting smoothly.

Got to be a better solution than scrapping what was otherwise a perfectly good blade.
 

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... pretty much anything from the big box stores or thin kerf are considered disposable...
Agree. I typically use Diablo, and when I see them on sale i will buy several -- they're hanging on the wall in my shop right now. I used to have blades sharpened locally by an old guy, but he died a couple of years ago and I have not yet found anyone else around here (within, say, a 30-minute drive) who can do a good job at reasonable price.
 

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I have a local saw sharpening shop I utilize. Sharpening my 10" carbide blades avg $10/blade. They'll also grind angles for dovetail or flat box-joint.
Hi NoNails. I'm also a retired Process Engineer. Loving working with wood instead of all kinds of metals.
Where are you located? Would be nice if I had a local sharpening that was that cheap.

Recently discovered that often dirty blades are mistaken for dull ones. Started cleaning my blades with Simple Green and they last much, much longer. Because of my background in CNC machining with mils and lathes I understand the importance of looking at every cutting edge with a magnifying glass, checking for chips or worn edges in the carbide. Realizing what I was seeing was dirt on my saw blades changed the paradigm.
 

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I understand the importance of looking at every cutting edge with a magnifying glass, checking for chips or worn edges in the carbide.
I've been wondering how to inspect blades etc, what do you recommend to the hobbyist for magnifying wood cutting tools? And I have age induced eye fuzz lol.
 

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Inspecting blades. I've been carving western red cedar for 25 years. It's very soft, like an over-ripe tomato.
The carving tool edges must be very sharp to cut that soft wood (or tomato). Sharper than mallet edges.

I have a 10X geologist's loupe magnifier and a LED spotlight.
Flat crushed spots on edges reflect a very bright "spark" of light along the edge.
My inspection determines whether I start with 600 or 800 to tune up the edge.
After 1,500, I hone on a strop and back to carving.

Totally banged up tools might get a whipping with 80 grit carborundum to begin with!

Scissors and 60 tooth TC 10" saw blades are the same. I don't use my chop saw very much any more so
I don't bother to inspect the blade unless I see gross scratches on the wood.
 
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