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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just replaced a 10" carbide tip blade - it was lugging while cutting and I finally realized it was more than 20 years old (time flies). Wondering what you guys do with dull carbide tip blades. Sharpen? Discard? Repurpose? Other?

BTW, replaced it with this one: 10 in. 40T General Purpose Miter & Table Saw Blade (harborfreight.com) I know it's pretty standard to shun cutting tools from HF - but this, at about $30, looks like a winner (at least in short term). I'll see how it is cutting after 20 years.
 

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Depends. Ive turned saw blade bodies into knives before, older blades used pretty good quality steel that made a decent knife. New blades are a bit hit or miss though, and even the old ones can be tricky to heat treat. Sharpening i dont bother with for cheap blades, if the blade was originally less than about $30, it would cost more for me to have it resharpened, and ive got better things to do than sharpen it myself. Ill sometimes keep one dull-ish blade around for cutting materials i dont want to kill my good blades on. For example, a while back i used one to cut some soft firebrick to make a kiln. Killed the blade, but the blade was dead anyways so it didnt matter

One thing ive wanted to try for a while has been to cut one of the teeth off the blade and turn it into a parting tool for use on a metal lathe. Should work pretty well, just havent got around to it yet
 

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I have a local saw sharpening shop I utilize. Sharpening my 10" carbide blades avg $10/blade. They'll also grind angles for dovetail or flat box-joint.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Read the full description guys and the 90 day money back warranty!
Many 5 star reviews, so For $26.00 not a huge gamble. I've never bought a sawblade from HF, so I can't tell you much, but I have bought other cutting tools and bits which were OK.
I have had $30.00 blades sharpened locally at the Cutting Edge, Dryden, MI, and they do a fine job. I don't recall the cost, but it was less than a new blade. I bring in 5 at a time to save on my gas cost and have lunch next door where all the waitstaff knows me. Nice family owned business and a GRUFF shop dog, but he warms up eventually.
 
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The more expensive blades that have plenty of carbide I definitely re-sharpen. If a cheaper blade has enough carbide and the re-sharpening cost is considerably less than the cost of a new blade of the same quality then I have that re-sharpened too. This assumes that the blades don't have to be shipped to the sharpener. If shipping is necessary then that cost has to be factored in.
I've been fortunate to have found a couple of local sharpeners who check each blade and offer their opinion on whether the blade is worthwhile re-sharpening e.g. blade has enough carbide, is flat, etc.
 

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One thing ive wanted to try for a while has been to cut one of the teeth off the blade and turn it into a parting tool for use on a metal lathe.
Just out of curiosity please explain what that is and how you use it. One tooth off = imbalanced, in use the parting tool isn't spinning?
 

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20 years? How much ww’ing do you do? I resharpen most used every 6 mos!

IMO you wasted your money on a HF saw blade. This is a 10x better blade. 38 bucks on Amazon. And for gosh sakes keep it clean and sharp!

427779
 

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20 years? How much ww’ing do you do? I resharpen most used every 6 mos!

IMO you wasted your money on a HF saw blade. This is a 10x better blade. 38 bucks on Amazon. And for gosh sakes keep it clean and sharp!

View attachment 427779
That is my favorite table saw blade. They use to cut so smooth I didn't need a jointer. Haven't tried one in years, CMT use to be right up there with Forrest as far as quality goes.
 

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where's my table saw?
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20 years? How much ww’ing do you do? I resharpen most used every 6 mos!

IMO you wasted your money on a HF saw blade. This is a 10x better blade. 38 bucks on Amazon. And for gosh sakes keep it clean and sharp!

View attachment 427779
That's a bit harsh, doncha think?
Let's wait and see how it works for him. It may last him 20 years like the other one, so 11$ amortized over 22 years is 0.50 $ per year. I'm sure you've have good experience with the CMT, and that's why you posted, but he's already purchased the HF blade so the CMT blade would be an added expense, and possibly not needed unless the HF blade fails, but then there's still the 90 day money back guarantee for complete satisfaction .....
I'd like to know how the HF blade performs, not that I would buy one, unless to just try it out.
My last 10" 40 tooth Diablo lasted for 3 years and it wasn't actually dull, I just decided to try out the 50 tooth Diablo. The 40 tooth is hanging on a nail on the shop door if I need to use it. FYI, I just ripped some PT 2 X 10's a few minutes ago and that went reasonably well, for that rather difficult to rip wood. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
20 years? How much ww’ing do you do? I resharpen most used every 6 mos!

IMO you wasted your money on a HF saw blade. This is a 10x better blade. 38 bucks on Amazon. And for gosh sakes keep it clean and sharp!

View attachment 427779
I bounce around from woodworking to metal working to machining to 3d printing to anything else that strikes my fancy. Some things get away from me - like the saw blade I thought I bought a couple of years ago that turned out to be 20 years old :(

Quality of the HF blade? Not as good as the CMT blade? Yet to be determined - it is a pretty new product.
 

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Harbor Freight blades?
I always have 2 or 3 laying around the shop. They have saved me a fortune and a lot of aggravation. When working with reclaimed or reusing wood, the trim to reasonable size cuts are made with the HF blades. They are my "Nail Finder" blades.
 

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I can't be the only one to sharpen my blades. I picked up a blade sharpener at HF and it's worked pretty good. I have a dozen blades I am sharpening and can’t remember the last time I purchased a new blade. I have also learned how to clean my blades. Cleaning helps a lot.


Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I can't be the only one to sharpen my blades. I picked up a blade sharpener at HF and it's worked pretty good. I have a dozen blades I am sharpening and can’t remember the last time I purchased a new blade. I have also learned how to clean my blades. Cleaning helps a lot.


Roger
I did not know they had this. So it actually work on carbide tips?
 

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mike44
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Depends. Ive turned saw blade bodies into knives before, older blades used pretty good quality steel that made a decent knife. New blades are a bit hit or miss though, and even the old ones can be tricky to heat treat. Sharpening i dont bother with for cheap blades, if the blade was originally less than about $30, it would cost more for me to have it resharpened, and ive got better things to do than sharpen it myself. Ill sometimes keep one dull-ish blade around for cutting materials i dont want to kill my good blades on. For example, a while back i used one to cut some soft firebrick to make a kiln. Killed the blade, but the blade was dead anyways so it didnt matter

One thing ive wanted to try for a while has been to cut one of the teeth off the blade and turn it into a parting tool for use on a metal lathe. Should work pretty well, just havent got around to it yet
I never thought of that, I think it may work well. What method could be used to attach the tooth to a suitable shank?. Maybe hard solder if welding is not an option? If the entire blade will not be used for sawing then I think a portion of the blade with the tooth attached can be welded or hard soldered to a 3/8" x3/8" x 4" CRS.
I use Warner cutoff blades myself. Used to use import crap , Warner makes the best cutting tools IMO.
mike
 

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junk yard had some rusty 10' ones for $2 each. I don't ask the source.
Cutting out Ulu and Umialik. I can grind an edge without cooking any of them.
I need a bone cleaver. Maybe a piece of a Ford F350 leaf spring will do.
 

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I just replaced a 10" carbide tip blade - it was lugging while cutting and I finally realized it was more than 20 years old (time flies). Wondering what you guys do with dull carbide tip blades. Sharpen? Discard? Repurpose? Other?

BTW, replaced it with this one: 10 in. 40T General Purpose Miter & Table Saw Blade (harborfreight.com) I know it's pretty standard to shun cutting tools from HF - but this, at about $30, looks like a winner (at least in short term). I'll see how it is cutting after 20 years.
Depends on the blade you are using. Inexpensive blades like Diablo and others are throw aways. On my shop saws I use Forrest Mfg. blades. I get them sharpened every 6 - 9 months depending on use. I have some blades that I have had for close to 10 years, until they tell me they can't sharpen them any more. Dull blades not only give you bad results, they are down right dangerous.
 

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I never thought of that, I think it may work well. What method could be used to attach the tooth to a suitable shank?. Maybe hard solder if welding is not an option? If the entire blade will not be used for sawing then I think a portion of the blade with the tooth attached can be welded or hard soldered to a 3/8" x3/8" x 4" CRS.
I use Warner cutoff blades myself. Used to use import crap , Warner makes the best cutting tools IMO.
mike
Oh, i wouldnt bother removing the carbide from the blade, id just cut the parting blade shape out of the blade steel with the carbide already at the cutting tip. Just cut the steel to fit into a standard parting blade holder, make things easier
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Depends on the blade you are using. Inexpensive blades like Diablo and others are throw aways. On my shop saws I use Forrest Mfg. blades. I get them sharpened every 6 - 9 months depending on use. I have some blades that I have had for close to 10 years, until they tell me they can't sharpen them any more. Dull blades not only give you bad results, they are down right dangerous.
It's a Freud. Looks like $60-$75 for a new one. I've found some ads for sharpening at $15-$20, so it would be worth looking into that option.
 

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Depends on the blade you are using. Inexpensive blades like Diablo and others are throw aways. On my shop saws I use Forrest Mfg. blades. I get them sharpened every 6 - 9 months depending on use. I have some blades that I have had for close to 10 years, until they tell me they can't sharpen them any more. Dull blades not only give you bad results, they are down right dangerous.
About the same, pretty much anything from the big box stores or thin kerf are considered disposable. Our "pro quality" and specialty blades get sharpened about once a year. I tried the CMT blades and I don't seem to get the life out of them like the Freud, Forest or Infinity blades. I did buy a rip blade from Lowes clearance rack for $6.00. (maybe called evante??) Except for the "singing" it's by far the best valued blade I ever purchased. luck of the draw I guess.
 
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