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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 12" jointer some years back from a furniture manufacturer here in MA. They gave me an extra set of blade. I had to convert it from a 400volt motor to 220 but that was easy. It works great but the original blades were in tough shape. I have a friend who is a tool and die maker and I asked him to sharpen the extra blades for me. He did and I'm trying to figure out how to align them. The old blades had about 1/16" exposure. I can't figure out how to measure the exposure consistently on both sides of the head.

Any of you old wood working guys work with one of these? See Pics! Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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where's my table saw?
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Check these out

It's easier to link a video than explain it .....


this guy is tedious, but informative:



What really matters is that all the blades are at the same height, whether they are even with the outfeed table or slightly above.
You can always raise or lower the outfeed table to get them exactly where you want them. Look in at 7:12 minutes for "even" with the outfeed table setting
 

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Here is another excellent reference video by Bob Vaughan:


Don't pay any attention to the knife 'exposure' unless it is excessive (in which case you probably have an adjustable out feed table and need to lower it a bit). You set the knives level to the out feed table and let the 'exposure' fall where it may. Dial indicator works a treat, straight edge will do if it's all you got. Some jointers have a TDC lock that makes things really easy.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great Information!

Thanks Guys, I appreciate all the info. I have a magnetic dial indicator so I will try these and see how it turns out. The only issue I see is I have no set screw adjuster. These blades just slide in the three slots for the tensioning screws. I will try just setting the tension snug and tapping the blade to its correct adjustment.

Thanks again
 

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>> The only issue I see is I have no set screw adjuster. <<

Not a problem.. Jack screws are nice but not a deal buster.. I have 3 jointers, none have jack screws, springs or anything else to aid in setting the height and they can all be set dead on if done properly.

You should have a knife wedge that secures the blade by tightening up the set screws in it.. put the knife in and snug the set screws, just enough so you can move the knife slightly when tapped on with a wood block or similar. Get one end level with the outfeed table, then do the opposite end. Keep in mind that raising one end usually lowers the other slightly, so just keep going back and forth until both are level and then check the middle at a couple of places. Once you have it at the correct height across the entire knife, tighten the set screws and re-check. Some machines will raise the knife slightly when you tighten down on the set screws, and usually by the same amount each time; so if yours does that, keep it in mind when initially setting the height and set them just slightly lower by the same amount before the final tightening.

A lot of people are intimidated by setting knifes.. it's really not that difficult, and with a dial indicator you can get spectacular results. Just go slow and take your time.. you will prevail in the end :thumbsup:

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Tool Fanactic
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>> The only issue I see is I have no set screw adjuster. <<

Not a problem.. Jack screws are nice but not a deal buster.. I have 3 jointers, none have jack screws, springs or anything else to aid in setting the height and they can all be set dead on if done properly.

You should have a knife wedge that secures the blade by tightening up the set screws in it.. put the knife in and snug the set screws, just enough so you can move the knife slightly when tapped on with a wood block or similar. Get one end level with the outfeed table, then do the opposite end. Keep in mind that raising one end usually lowers the other slightly, so just keep going back and forth until both are level and then check the middle at a couple of places. Once you have it at the correct height across the entire knife, tighten the set screws and re-check. Some machines will raise the knife slightly when you tighten down on the set screws, and usually by the same amount each time; so if yours does that, keep it in mind when initially setting the height and set them just slightly lower by the same amount before the final tightening.

A lot of people are intimidated by setting knifes.. it's really not that difficult, and with a dial indicator you can get spectacular results. Just go slow and take your time.. you will prevail in the end :thumbsup:

Cheers,
Brad
Did you even look at the pictures? He has a machine with slotted knives that are held on with cap bolts. There are no gibs or gib bolts.

OP-

please take care with those knives and head. Your best bet with those knives and head is to reference the projection past the head and match one to the other.

Then you can set the out feed to the knives.

Who made that pretty old machine? Got any more pictures?

Make sure the knives and head are clean, dry and free from oil before installing the knives
 

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Did you even look at the pictures? He has a machine with slotted knives that are held on with cap bolts. There are no gibs or gib bolts.
LOL - Didn't pay enough attention.. but the procedure is still the same, wedge plate or not. Referencing to the head may or may not work depending on if the head is perfectly parallel to the out feed table and the out feed table is actually adjustable. I've seen quite a few jointers that had the cutter head out of parallel slightly, particularly on older machines.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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where's my table saw?
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no height adjustment screws?

Your friendly machine shop can drill and tap the 6 holes you need for a small fee. I got a 6" cutter head tapped for $40.00, but holes are holes and the size of the cutter head shouldn't matter.

As far as I know, those old style cutter heads are no longer allowed in production shops, and that's why the old, but good jointers come up for sale often and are so cheap. I thinks there were some occasions where the machine was not set up properly, the knives or knife came loose and caused an injury,....I donno? They are nothing to "play" with if you are not certain how to properly secure the knives and what torque settings are needed on the cap screws.

I also wonder if the knives shown are not a little "oversharpened" and have too little metal above the slots......I donno?

Warner what do you say in this regard? :blink:
 

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Tool Fanactic
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Yes Bill those knives are pretty much spent. I wouldn't use them much longer.

The whole head yoke is adjustable, never seen a jointer where you couldn't make the head parallel to the tables.

That head actually looks like a cap head and the caps that hold the knife on, are long since gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Specs? Guidelines?

Yes Bill those knives are pretty much spent. I wouldn't use them much longer.

The whole head yoke is adjustable, never seen a jointer where you couldn't make the head parallel to the tables.

That head actually looks like a cap head and the caps that hold the knife on, are long since gone.
OK, So how does one figure out where the limits are? How thin can the yoke get before the blades need to be replace. Bill also commented on torque spec. This head has square thin, 1/4" or so, bolt heads, 3/4" bolts.

What's a "cap head"?

The information you guys have provided has be very helpful. Thanks for all the comments and advice. It is both helpful and appreciated.
 
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