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Alan Sweet
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always experiment with stuff before actually doing it. A bit annal retentive I know.

But I've tried gluing cocobolo pieces together and I don't like the result. Weak bond. I tried cleaning with acetone, mineral spirits, alcohol, ... not happy with results.

It appears in all those case that the wood oil/wax whatever will ooze right back to the surface in no time.

Any ideas?
 

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I always experiment with stuff before actually doing it. A bit annal retentive I know.

But I've tried gluing cocobolo pieces together and I don't like the result. Weak bond. I tried cleaning with acetone, mineral spirits, alcohol, ... not happy with results.

It appears in all those case that the wood oil/wax whatever will ooze right back to the surface in no time.

Any ideas?
I have a recollection of reading that for this species, the urethane glues work, the kind which foams. I hate the stuff, messy to use and goes off in the bottle.

Not expensive to try. One example.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000343/8481/Titebond-Polyurethane-Glue-4oz.aspx
 

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I have glued Teak (oily wood) with good results, by wiping down with acetone, and as soon as dry, glueing with epoxy. Not the quick set stuff.
If using thickened epoxy, first cover each surface with unthickened epoxy, for a better bond.
 

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Gluing oily woods is a challenge because until it dries, it will sweat oil. And in oily woods 'dry' is relative.

What has worked for me is to wipe the component's area to be glued with acetone as mentioned, multiple times. Sometimes it has taken 2 days of wiping whenever it feels oily. When my fingertips detect the same 'dry' feeling as a non oily wood, I glue up with regular wood glue.
 

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Alan Sweet
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I tried making hide glue a few years back. I was not real successful. If I recall correctly, I ended up with a bowl full of non congealed stuff that never dried. I let it set for over a week and it seemed to be just as mushy as it was when I set it there. I eventually put the whole thing in a plastic bag and gently placed it at the bottom of the trash barrel. I have never tried make or use hide glue since. I guess I need to be more persistent.
 

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I wood if I could.
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I tried making hide glue a few years back. I was not real successful. If I recall correctly, I ended up with a bowl full of non congealed stuff that never dried. I let it set for over a week and it seemed to be just as mushy as it was when I set it there. I eventually put the whole thing in a plastic bag and gently placed it at the bottom of the trash barrel. I have never tried make or use hide glue since. I guess I need to be more persistent.
Personally, I'd buy hide glue way before attempting to make it myself.
 

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Super glue

When I make pens from cocobolo I clean with alcohol and use super glue for the pens finish. There are slower set super glues but the are still quick as compared to any wood glue.
 

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I always experiment with stuff before actually doing it. A bit annal retentive I know.

But I've tried gluing cocobolo pieces together and I don't like the result. Weak bond. I tried cleaning with acetone, mineral spirits, alcohol, ... not happy with results.

It appears in all those case that the wood oil/wax whatever will ooze right back to the surface in no time.

Any ideas?
I suspect that you far from being "anal retentive."

The term anal retentive (also anally retentive), commonly abbreviated to anal,[1] is used to describe a person who pays such attention to detail that the obsession becomes an annoyance to others, potentially to the detriment of the anal-retentive person. The term derives from Freudian psychoanalysis.

Experimenting with new procedures, materials, etc is quite common and normal.

George
 
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