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A few months ago I purchased a TERRIFIC 1959 Craftsman Radial Arm Saw. It even came with the original bound manual. Problem is, the manual does NOT have anything about oiling.

I want to oil the gears in the vertical shaft and the rollers on the head. Is there any info on where I should place the oil? I tried to google but couldn't find what I wanted. I want to make sure this baby lasts another 54 years! :)

Thanks!!
 

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when i disassembled a c-man RAS from the 60s, i found an impressive amount of grease in the gears that connected the elevation rod (with the crank handle) to the rod within the column that supports the overhead track. i don't think that's an area you need to be concerned with, especially as i seem to recall literally having to take most of the column support apart to get to it.

as far as the roller dearings that hold the saw carriage to the overarm tracks, a little white lithium grease or dry lube should do the trick. if using WLG, just make sure it's completely dry before conducting any operations that would introduce sawdust to the WLG. otherwise, it tends to attract and hold sawdust, resulting in a gummy mess.

i presently have a mid 60s c-man RAS in the shop and find that it requires very little lubrication or adjustment, but it's use is restricted to 90° crosscuts.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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If you insist, use lithium white grease.
 

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Old School
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when i disassembled a c-man RAS from the 60s, i found an impressive amount of grease in the gears that connected the elevation rod (with the crank handle) to the rod within the column that supports the overhead track. i don't think that's an area you need to be concerned with, especially as i seem to recall literally having to take most of the column support apart to get to it.

as far as the roller dearings that hold the saw carriage to the overarm tracks, a little white lithium grease or dry lube should do the trick. if using WLG, just make sure it's completely dry before conducting any operations that would introduce sawdust to the WLG. otherwise, it tends to attract and hold sawdust, resulting in a gummy mess.

i presently have a mid 60s c-man RAS in the shop and find that it requires very little lubrication or adjustment, but it's use is restricted to 90° crosscuts.
+1. :yes: WLG doesn't really dry, and will attract any dust. I've never done more than kept the saw blown out, to include all the cranking mechanism. Wipe down the guide bars/track and rollers should be kept clean. IIRC, they are sealed. If there was some critical lubrication necessary, the manual should have covered it.






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