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I have just accented cypress wood grain with silver oil based paint. The boards are still very fibrous and easily splinter. It is for a restaurant and one could easily get a splinter when running their hands along the boards. How do I achieve a protective coat without marring the paint? Looking for a completely transparent sealer with some body, I guess, to keep the spikes at bay. The boards are already secured to the wall.

Thanks in advance
 

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It would have been better to have sanded the wood free of splinters before you painted it but you can coat over it. I would put a coat of Zinsser Sealcoat over the silver enamel as a barrier coat and put multiple coats of a water based polyurethane over it. Once you get about 3 mils of finish you can start lightly sanding between coats until you get if covered. 3 mils is about the thickness of a lawn and leaf trash bag. I recommended the water base poly because it will remain clear where the oil based poly will yellow as it ages and take away from the silver appearance.
 

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So polyurethane is the clearest finish I can achieve? Is there a thick version such has a marine style varnish that is available? What is the preferred method of application? Roller, brush, sprayer?

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So polyurethane is the clearest finish I can achieve? Is there a thick version such has a marine style varnish that is available? What is the preferred method of application? Roller, brush, sprayer?

Thanks
A marine grade spar varnish is an oil based finish and is one that will yellow as it ages. It has some amber appearance as it is applied and when it gets older the yellow color will alter the color of the paint. If you are looking for something other than the water based poly look for a finish that says acrylic. Any acrylic finish will remain clear. Just don't put an acrylic lacquer over it. The solvents in lacquer are too hot for the enamel paint. You can brush a water based polyurethane but I think everyone here would agree it would work better sprayed. To brush it you need to work fast and not over-brush it. Just apply it and move on. The more you brush it the more the brush marks are going to show.
 

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Agree 100% with Steve Neul. Good waterbased Urethanes are not what they used to be. They are crystal clear. In my experience even the minwax polycrylic is "ok", but products from General Finishes and Target Coatings are certainly higher quality.
I'd add that another option may be a high build, pour on, clear epoxy, though the boards will definitely need to come down to pour this stuff on.
I would also choose to spray the WB urethane.
 

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Agree 100% with Steve Neul. Good waterbased Urethanes are not what they used to be. They are crystal clear. In my experience even the minwax polycrylic is "ok", but products from General Finishes and Target Coatings are certainly higher quality.
I'd add that another option may be a high build, pour on, clear epoxy, though the boards will definitely need to come down to pour this stuff on.
I would also choose to spray the WB urethane.
Thank you all. I bought a gallon of Varathane water based satin polyurathane. As for retaining the shiny quality of the silver paint, would it matter if the finish is a gloss versus a satin. Would a gloss finish compensate for the possible luster that may be lost by a sealant application? Is the consensus that spraying would be a better method of application rather than brushing or rolling? This to ensure no abrasive contact with the paint?
 

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Thank you all. I bought a gallon of Varathane water based satin polyurathane. As for retaining the shiny quality of the silver paint, would it matter if the finish is a gloss versus a satin. Would a gloss finish compensate for the possible luster that may be lost by a sealant application? Is the consensus that spraying would be a better method of application rather than brushing or rolling? This to ensure no abrasive contact with the paint?
If the subject wood is already installed, spraying would create overspray. I would brush on the WB, and the gloss would retain the best look, IMO.






.
 

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So polyurethane is the clearest finish I can achieve? Is there a thick version such has a marine style varnish that is available? What is the preferred method of application? Roller, brush, sprayer?

Thanks
They DO make and sell a marine type product that 'might' have worked for you.

It is a West Systems product designed for boat decks and especially for rotted or damaged / severly weathered wood. It soaks into the pores and hardens thus increasing the strength of the wood in a big way...

Should have been done before you painted it though and sealed the pores...
 

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If the subject wood is already installed, spraying would create overspray. I would brush on the WB, and the gloss would retain the best look, IMO.






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...unless it is a fine mist, low pressure? Is build up the concern?
 

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Hum said:
So polyurethane is the clearest finish I can achieve? Is there a thick version such has a marine style varnish that is available? What is the preferred method of application? Roller, brush, sprayer?

Thanks
Lacquer is very clear too.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Thank you all. I bought a gallon of Varathane water based satin polyurathane. As for retaining the shiny quality of the silver paint, would it matter if the finish is a gloss versus a satin. Would a gloss finish compensate for the possible luster that may be lost by a sealant application? Is the consensus that spraying would be a better method of application rather than brushing or rolling? This to ensure no abrasive contact with the paint?
With any finish the flattening agents they put in it to make a satin make the finish more porous than a gloss finish and therefore less durable. The difference is so minor though unless you are using the finish outdoors or in a very wet location I don't think you could tell the difference. I prefer to spray any finish so I'm prejudice toward spraying. I will brush or roll the finish though if it is in a location where the overspray would get on something else I don't want. Yesterday I recoated some kitchen cabinets for someone using lacquer and I sprayed it. Lacquer dries so fast that the overspray dries to dust before it reaches the floor so it isn't a issue. I just have to mask off what might get a direct spray. Then right next to the kitchen I had to finish a stairway with a floor finish. Because I was only finishing the treads and handrail I brushed the finish to prevent getting the finish on the risers or floor next to the stairway. I don't do enough finishing by hand though to get into using a roller but it's my understanding using a water based finish a foam roller is the preferred method of rolling it.
 
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