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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I give anyone and everyone credit that can use this stuff and make it look as good as you do. I however am not one of you. I used it on two bowls I just turned and I could have easily sprayed 20 bowls and had pretty much zero buffing to do in the same time or less. Honestly I could have done more than that.

Maybe 25+ years of spraying finishes has something to do with it but I am going to go back to what I was doing but at least I tried.
 

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LOL ... I know exactly how you feel, and *** isn't the only finish that drives me to despair.

What finish do you intend to use? Rattle-can something-or-other? Or a finish using a HVLP spray system? Other? I'd love to try something that at least one person has mastered!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LOL ... I know exactly how you feel, and *** isn't the only finish that drives me to despair.

What finish do you intend to use? Rattle-can something-or-other? Or a finish using a HVLP spray system? Other? I'd love to try something that at least one person has mastered!
I can shoot lacquer or poly with rattle cans as good or better than a gun. I have done it for so many years it is really easier and much faster for me to use them and no clean up of equipment. When you go through cans by the case like I have for as long a time you get a lot of practice and learn the tricks.
 

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I can shoot lacquer or poly with rattle cans as good or better than a gun. I have done it for so many years it is really easier and much faster for me to use them and no clean up of equipment. When you go through cans by the case like I have for as long a time you get a lot of practice and learn the tricks.
I can readily believe that -- in your experience, is one brand better than the rest? Do you have a favorite?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can readily believe that -- in your experience, is one brand better than the rest? Do you have a favorite?
Yes I really prefer Deft but it isn't sold near me anymore so I am using Valspar which works fine I just think Deft has a harder finish. Neither is cheap at $7-$9 a can but I think I make up for the cost in efficiency and time saved not to mention no need for sanding them or buffing with steel wool.

Talking with several friends that all turn an every one of them uses Deft and two of them are very well known turners.
 

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I'd love to hear tips on using rattle cans. Every time I've tried to use them for more than a very light coat or two I end up with dimples and lots of between coat sanding. I use a wipe on tung oil finish by Min-Wax if I want shiny, which isn't often these days, and have decent luck with it if I can keep the lint away. I'm working on an urn that will require a build finish and haven't decided which way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'd love to hear tips on using rattle cans. Every time I've tried to use them for more than a very light coat or two I end up with dimples and lots of between coat sanding. I use a wipe on tung oil finish by Min-Wax if I want shiny, which isn't often these days, and have decent luck with it if I can keep the lint away. I'm working on an urn that will require a build finish and haven't decided which way to go.
First thing you learn is put on a light coat let it dry then another and another. Umm no. When I shoot a coat I spin the piece slowly moving the can vertically left to right and then back. I wait just a few seconds to allow the finish time to start to barely tack up then shoot another coat. That is one coat for me then I let it dry and repeat the process at least once more. Start spraying before the can is over the piece and don't stop until you are past the piece. Turn the piece about 45* or so and start again.

A light coat left to dry will do exactly what you said it dimples and you have to deal with that. Warm the can on cool days by placing it in a window or warm a pan of water on the stove remove it and place the can in that for several minutes. This increases pressure and reduces viscosity which atomizes the contents better providing finer particles and a smoother finish.

Those are the best tips to get you started hope they help some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
are you saying you spin it on the lathe?
how do you keep from coating everything around?
No I spray them once they are completed and off the lathe. I like to use a clear stain so I get that done and dried then spray them.

No spray booth I heard some folks say, no problem. Take a cardboard box big enough to hold the work, cut the front and most of the top off, instant spray booth. Yes some mist will go out the top but it is easier to work in the box with most of the top removed. You could even suspend a light over it after you spray to add heat to help cure the piece.

Poor guy's solution to equipment needs. :icon_smile:
 

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I use wipe on poly in the winter simply because I can't spray in my shop when I have to keep the door closed. It is slower because I wait for each coat to dry. The first coat takes about 8 hours. After that it goes much faster. I do a light buff with steel wool between coats. It usually takes about 4 to 6 coats to get a really nice glossy finish. Most of the time I'm satisfied with a more satin finish so a couple of coats, steel wool and then buff with furniture wax and I get a nice looking finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I use wipe on poly in the winter simply because I can't spray in my shop when I have to keep the door closed. It is slower because I wait for each coat to dry. The first coat takes about 8 hours. After that it goes much faster. I do a light buff with steel wool between coats. It usually takes about 4 to 6 coats to get a really nice glossy finish. Most of the time I'm satisfied with a more satin finish so a couple of coats, steel wool and then buff with furniture wax and I get a nice looking finish.
Thanks john. I hate the time it takes to get the finish smooth. Since I do these to sell that time could go to other things and needs to. Working on one piece for that amount of time isn't cost effective from my point of view. If I was turning them for myself or friends then I wouldn't mind taking longer.
 

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Here's a peppermill I recently finished with General Woodturner's Finish. I wiped it on on the lathe using a cosmetic sponge wrapped in a piece of panty hose.

Actually, I do the first coat with a rag because the panty hose tend to snag on the tiniest imperfection until things get a little smoother. If there's interest, here's my schedule:


Sand piece to 320

Apply first coat with rag, trying to keep it very wet until it looks like it can't absorb more.

Sand with 400 to remove nibs and raised grain.

Apply 3-5 coats using a cosmetic sponge wrapped in a piece of panty hose.

Sand with 600 to remove nibs, sags or high spots

Apply 2-3 coats with the cosmetic sponge wrapped in panty hose.

You can polish with micro mesh if you want, but as I've gotten better at it, I find the "of the sponge" finish to be fine.

Drying time depends on the environment. Lately here it's been cold and wet, so I've been allowing 20 minutes between coats. Warmer and dryer, I've seen id dry in just a few minutes.

Also, I tint the General Woodturner's Finish with a couple drops of TransTint amber to warm it up a little.
 

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