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Thumb Nailer
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Given the equipment I have, I figure router / router table is the best wan to cut mortise & tennon joints. However I have never done them. I am figuring on the following.

The project is to create joints in pine 2x2 stock for a router cabinet frame. I am assuming I would use a half inch straight flute dead center on the mortise piece, with a stop at the end of fence to stop the bit at 1.5" down. The tenon would in turn be cut 1/2" on each side. and the bottom side of the tennon would have to be hand shaved to fit the round bottom the router bit will leave. I could cut each 3/4" deep, and on the inside of the joint, use 1.25" brads to pin the joint together as the glue sets. (Can I clamp it without the brads to keep the joint metal free?)

Am I on the right track or am I way off here?
 

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Using a router or drill press will leave rounded edges on the mortises. You could use a chisel to square them off, else you will also need to round off the tenons. If the tenon fits in the mortise snugly with room for glue, then you should not need the brads. I would cut the mortises first, then sneak up on the fit of the tenons.

Good luck and send pictures when done!

http://www.craftandwoodworking.com
 

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For the time it would take to make a jig to form mortices with a router, especially as it's only a small project you're going to be using it for. I'd simply drill the bulk of the mortice out with a 1/2" bit then clean the rest out by chisel. For cutting the tennons, I'd used a copsaw, with drawing facility and depth stop or, cut those by hand


:laughing: :smile: :laughing:
 

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Thumb Nailer
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Discussion Starter #4
Uh. Sorry about not being specific. I kind of want to know HOW to do it... Particularly on a saw or router... And I found some great books at Lowes last night kind of hidden from I think it was Fine Woodworking Magazine, they were special howto books that basically run you completely through the common cuts, how to make certain jigs, etc... I am now ready to get busy...
 

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dbhost,

I'm just starting out, too. I found this free downloadable book with all of the most common types of joints and some of the more unusual types, too.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/21531
It doesn't cater to the modern machined-filled workshop -- it's more for the basic hand-tool workshop -- but I've found it's very useful and I can figure out how to cut the joints with routers and what have you.

hope it's a help.

J
 

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Given the equipment I have, I figure router / router table is the best wan to cut mortise & tennon joints. However I have never done them. I am figuring on the following.

The project is to create joints in pine 2x2 stock for a router cabinet frame. I am assuming I would use a half inch straight flute dead center on the mortise piece, with a stop at the end of fence to stop the bit at 1.5" down. The tenon would in turn be cut 1/2" on each side. and the bottom side of the tennon would have to be hand shaved to fit the round bottom the router bit will leave. I could cut each 3/4" deep, and on the inside of the joint, use 1.25" brads to pin the joint together as the glue sets. (Can I clamp it without the brads to keep the joint metal free?)

Am I on the right track or am I way off here?

A tool that works very well, although a bit pricey, is the Festool domino joiner. It is very accurate, easy to use, and makes a very strong joint.

Rich from Greenfield, WI
 

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Yep, I love that Festool Domino.... but being a novice, am not about to pay that for a tool I wont use that much.

Does anyone know of a similar joiner that is much less $ ?

Thanks

Paul
 

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Pianoman
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You know...to each his own!! What feels safe and right to anyone...gets better with practice. I prefer to cut most tenons on the table saw...and shallow mortises on a table router. If I need a deep mortise, I will use a drill press, then, clean with chissel. Sometimes I will chissel a tennon that I`ve cut on the table saw...in order to round it off for a tighter fit in the mortise. At anyrate...do what feels safe to you! Rick
 
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