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Hello all,

New to the forum. Just setting up my shop. I have made a few projects but not for several years. I am setting up a shop about 12' X 32'. I have a Delta miter saw, Delta table saw (small), Craftsman bench top jointer, Craftsman router & Rockler router table, Skil hand held belt sander, Craftsman orbital pad sander, Craftsman detail sander, Craftsman sabre saw, Milwaukee 18 volt cordless drill, rotozip, Delta drill press, quick grip clamps, bar clamps, circular saw. Saw horses

I need the tools to be somewhat portable due to limited space. What else, might I need. This is just for a hobby. Thanks

Joe
 

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As far as I'm concerned....a 14" bandsaw is essential. You'd have a hard time pryin' that out of my cold dead hands!!!
 

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Hi Bigjoedo;

Sounds like you are off to a good start. I would suggest you plan your first project or two, and then figure out what you are going to need to accomplish them. I agree with Corndog that a band saw is mighty handy, but so is a radial arm saw, and a whole host of other goodies. You will figure out what you need, as the need arises.

Have fun

Gerry
 

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Empty shop

I'm 'very' new here. I just had a 16'x22' addition added to my garage for a workshop. Currenty have an empty room with 4 windows and a shiny cement floor with in floor heating installed for the winter months.
So I need some suggestions as to what I now need to set up shop!!
I'm thinking at this point that I will try something like toys or birdhouses, something small to start with and progress to larger projects as I pick up techneques?
Cost is always a factor in any hobby but I dont mind spending a little extra now and not have to replace a piece next month or next year.
Any suggestions or ideals welcome from this 'newbie'
 

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Hello all,

New to the forum. Just setting up my shop. I have made a few projects but not for several years. I am setting up a shop about 12' X 32'. I have a Delta miter saw, Delta table saw (small), Craftsman bench top jointer, Craftsman router & Rockler router table, Skil hand held belt sander, Craftsman orbital pad sander, Craftsman detail sander, Craftsman sabre saw, Milwaukee 18 volt cordless drill, rotozip, Delta drill press, quick grip clamps, bar clamps, circular saw. Saw horses

I need the tools to be somewhat portable due to limited space. What else, might I need. This is just for a hobby. Thanks

Joe
Great start you have there, I agree that a 14" bandsaw is a must as far as I'm concerned and then a 12-1/2" planer but we must not forget " Dust collection"
 

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I'm 'very' new here. I just had a 16'x22' addition added to my garage for a workshop. Currenty have an empty room with 4 windows and a shiny cement floor with in floor heating installed for the winter months.
So I need some suggestions as to what I now need to set up shop!!
I'm thinking at this point that I will try something like toys or birdhouses, something small to start with and progress to larger projects as I pick up techneques?
Cost is always a factor in any hobby but I dont mind spending a little extra now and not have to replace a piece next month or next year.
Any suggestions or ideals welcome from this 'newbie'
I think it would be a good idea if you posted this again under a new thread in all fairness to the guy who started this thread.:thumbsup:
 

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Good suggestion Daryl, but it is kind of along the same vein. We can probably address both at the same time. Jonathan: I agree with Daryl. You have a good start, in having a decent sized shop to start out with. I would offer the same advice that I did for the initial post. think about what you would like to start out with for projects, and then go look at the tools that you think you will need to accomplish the tasks. Start small, and work your way into it. Personally, I would suggest that you start with some good quality hand held power, and manual tools, and then take it from there. There is lots of good advice available as to which tools are better. As you progress, you will realise that there are various tools available to help you accomplish the tasks more easily. When you are thinking about improving/upgrading the tools there is a lot of information available in various forum posts as to which tools to go for. If you are on a limited budget don't blow your entire bankroll on one expensive tool. I also totally agree with Daryl. Most woodworking produces dust, so always be aware of the dust you create, and look at ways to keep it out of your lungs.

Have fun

Gerry
 

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Then this begs the question of "If you had to have a table saw or a radial arm saw, which would you get?". Most smaller shops can only have one or the other.
 

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Monkey, I don't think you are serious but I'll give the benefit of the doubt.

But first you must know how to compare things. A radial arm saw is relevant to about 1% of any production application.

In fact, Sears ought to be sued for selling so many of the damn things.

In fact, they were. More than once.

Get the table saw until you come to grips with Festools guide rail system, which, I am still in denial about myself.
 

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I think there has been a lot of good discussion on the beginner tools. I can't add to what has already been said.

I would however like to throw my hat in with TT on the RAS vs. Table saw debate and expand on it.

Having both myself, I wish I had opted for a good chop saw over the radial. In fact, the only advantage the radial has over a "standard" 10" chop saw is that I can cross cut a 14" board with it. Given that my jointer is 6" and the planer 12", it is rare that I need to cut a 14" board.

One of the biggest problems I have with the RAS is keeping it square to the fence. Every time I swing it to cut a 45, I can bet when I bring it back to 90 it will be out of square. Actually, every time I set up for a different cut I have to make sure the blade is square to the table, the blade tracks true across the table, is square to the fence, is parallel to the table over the length of the arm......lots and lots of setup time, get my drift?

My saw has the capability to turn the head parallel to the fence for ripping. There is a nice dent in the garage door from a particularly nasty kick-back. Fortunately, I wasn't in the line of fire.

To boil it down, my RAS can do miters,compound miters, rip, cross cut and even has a molding attachment, but I only use it to cross-cut to length and miter pieces too long for the table saw to handle (molding). Things a chop saw could do at 1/3 the price.
 

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Monkey, I don't think you are serious but I'll give the benefit of the doubt.

But first you must know how to compare things. A radial arm saw is relevant to about 1% of any production application.

In fact, Sears ought to be sued for selling so many of the damn things.

In fact, they were. More than once.

Get the table saw until you come to grips with Festools guide rail system, which, I am still in denial about myself.
Yes I was serious. I ask people I know this question. When my workshop is done I'll have to go through this decision process. I can remember at one time a radial arm saw is what my dad had. We ripped plywood with it, did this, did that. I never used a table saw until later in life. So with this early exposure I always thought it was the way to go. Most people I have spoken to agree with you about getting a table saw. Since this thread was about limited space I figured it was a fine time to get your opinions.
 

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I think there has been a lot of good discussion on the beginner tools. I can't add to what has already been said.

I would however like to throw my hat in with TT on the RAS vs. Table saw debate and expand on it.

Having both myself, I wish I had opted for a good chop saw over the radial. In fact, the only advantage the radial has over a "standard" 10" chop saw is that I can cross cut a 14" board with it. Given that my jointer is 6" and the planer 12", it is rare that I need to cut a 14" board.

One of the biggest problems I have with the RAS is keeping it square to the fence. Every time I swing it to cut a 45, I can bet when I bring it back to 90 it will be out of square. Actually, every time I set up for a different cut I have to make sure the blade is square to the table, the blade tracks true across the table, is square to the fence, is parallel to the table over the length of the arm......lots and lots of setup time, get my drift?

My saw has the capability to turn the head parallel to the fence for ripping. There is a nice dent in the garage door from a particularly nasty kick-back. Fortunately, I wasn't in the line of fire.

To boil it down, my RAS can do miters,compound miters, rip, cross cut and even has a molding attachment, but I only use it to cross-cut to length and miter pieces too long for the table saw to handle (molding). Things a chop saw could do at 1/3 the price.
I was considering the chop saw and a table saw. Your experience fits what I was thinking.
 

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I totally agree, I have a 10" SCMS dual bevel and 10" contactor table saw and would be lost without them. I can remember growing up using a Radial and all the fine tunning we had to do all the time and now not nearly as much and find a table saw with a good sled works better with cleaner cuts.
 

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The table saw is probably the most versatile, and most frequently used stationary piece of equipment in most shops. I would buy it first, and if space and money allow look at getting a radial saw down the road. They do have adjustment issues, but there are things that a good radial saw can do that are not as easily done with a table saw. The sliding compound miter saw that Daryl is talking about is s good practical option to a radial arm saw, and the space requirements are much less.

Gerry
 

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I think the next big tool should be a planer then a band saw. Dust colection is nice nut wear a mask and get the tools first. But what about hand tools, is it a given that you have chisels, mortising bits, and hand planes. These three are thing I use on almost all nice projects
 

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Excuse my ignorance, but what is the difference between a radial and a chop saw.?
Here in UK we have what I think is a chop saw, but it can be adjusted to variety of angles to cut mitres etc.
johnep
 

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Radial is an older design. Think of a larger sliding chop saw with a large table 24" x 36". you can pull the saw towards you lock it in place and rotate it 90* to rip material. They have lost a lot of market to portable chop saws and table saws but still a nice tool. I rebuilt my fathers 20 yr old dewalt because the table was partical board and used it for making greek key molding with datos in the blade. Worked great for longer material than you could handel on a table saw.
 

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Just a random thought. An often overlooked "tool" but a tool none the less...CLAMPS!!!!!! And LOTS of 'em!!!!:yes:
 
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