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Hello guys, new to the site but I have a few questions and thought this may be a good place to ask them. We recently had a new Pella designer series patio door installed which has a unfinished wood veneer on the interior. The first question is: I am looking for a stain that applies to pine evenly, does anyone have experience with Zar wood stains? The other question is what would be a better finish after staining; poly, or pure tongue oil? I am leaning towards tongue oil for its ease of touch up but any suggestions/comments would be appreciated.
 

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Hello guys, new to the site but I have a few questions and thought this may be a good place to ask them. We recently had a new Pella designer series patio door installed which has a unfinished wood veneer on the interior. The first question is: I am looking for a stain that applies to pine evenly, does anyone have experience with Zar wood stains? The other question is what would be a better finish after staining; poly, or pure tongue oil? I am leaning towards tongue oil for its ease of touch up but any suggestions/comments would be appreciated.
You should use a conditioner when staining pine. For a finish, You are likely not going to spray the door, so, I would use a wiping version of an oil base interior varnish, or an oil base polyurethane.




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A wood conditioner would be helpful to make the stain go on more uniform. You could use a tung oil finish over it but it wouldn't offer the same protection you would get from a film finish. With a tung oil finish you would get hand marks on the door from normal handling and if you stain the door it would prevent you from sanding the marks off and re-applying the finish. If I was going to use a tung oil finish I would use it only and not use stain on the door. If you do choose to put a polyurethane on the door if it is light in color I would use a water based polyurethane. If it is medium to dark in color I would use a oil based polyurethane. An oil based polyurethane will yellow as it ages and shows up on light woods.
 

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In mosr cases the product labeled "tung oil" on the shelf at the store is little more than a very thin varnish, usually called wiping varnish. I would suggest just using a good quality varnish, brushed or wiped, your choice. If you prefer to use wiping varnish, just dilute it 50/50 with mineral spirits. If you brush, dilute it a lot less. If you want to avoid the normal yellowing that a varnish has, choose a soya oil based formula, such as Pratt and Lambert 38. It's the linseed oil in most varnishes that cause the amber tone, and the subsequent yellowing they have over time.
 

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Thanks for the comments and suggestions guys! Will try and report back when finished.
 
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