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Hey I’m new here. My grandpa was a master craftsman and I would spend hours with him him his work shop when I was a child. I was always amazed at what he could make. We would make China cabinets, cedar chests, and lazy susans. He could do anything with wood. Unfortunately he passed away a few months ago and being I am the oldest grandson and showed the most interest in the trade he left me his work shop. Now I want to make him proud and keep up the woodworking craft. There is so much I don’t know but I am excited to jump in and learn. Just happy to be here!
 

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Welcome!

I’m fairly new as well so look forward to learning with you. I think this is a hobby where you always feel “new” but that’s a fun thing, you always have room to grow.

You must have inherited some classic tools too so that should be fun to learn, the old adage “they don’t make them like they used to” is very true. My dad still uses my grandpas 50s vintage craftsman table saw and jointer and I still love grandpas 50s era craftsman drill press, both with original motors. Hard to find something that will last 60-70 years in today’s equipment options (not that new stuff doesn’t have its perks).
 

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where's my table saw?
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You boys came to the right place, welcome to you. Old tools and machines have a quality to them the new ones don't and the heavy old cast iron ones are great.
As far as increasing knowledge you can read and watch, but to increase skill you must "do". Hands on is the best teacher, so get those old tools out, clean them up and sharpen those that need it. Sharpening skills are just as important as the joinery skills, and there a lot of joints that require hand work. For a practice exercise I recommend taking a block of rough sawn wood, even a chunk of firewood and squaring and straightening it into a rectangle. Measuring a squaring requires some special tools as well. Hopefully you have some of those and will get them cleaned and polished up. After measuring and sharpening and practicing all that's left is "doing"!

Speaking of a firewood logs, I've turned a few of them into keepsake or jewelry boxes myself:

Taking a rough firewood log and flattening it for use on the bandsaw:

Finally, the ultimate firewood log project:
427208
 

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You boys came to the right place, welcome to you. Old tools and machines have a quality to them the new ones don't and the heavy old cast iron ones are great.
As far as increasing knowledge you can read and watch, but to increase skill you must "do". Hands on is the best teacher, so get those old tools out, clean them up and sharpen those that need it. Sharpening skills are just as important as the joinery skills, and there a lot of joints that require hand work. For a practice exercise I recommend taking a block of rough sawn wood, even a chunk of firewood and squaring and straightening it into a rectangle. Measuring a squaring requires some special tools as well. Hopefully you have some of those and will get them cleaned and polished up. After measuring and sharpening and practicing all that's left is "doing"!

Speaking of a firewood logs, I've turned a few of them into keepsake or jewelry boxes myself:

Taking a rough firewood log and flattening it for use on the bandsaw:

Finally, the ultimate firewood log project:
View attachment 427208
I was looking for this kind of information,
thanks for sharing :love:
 

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Regarding firewood, we were given a presentation about all of the different kinds of local wood at a recent woodworking club meeting. The presenter was someone who earns money by scouring the local firewood sellers. She locates the good hardwood chunks and burls, buys them as firewood and provides them to woodworkers and woodturners for bowls and other projects. She is also an expert on local wood species.
 

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Regarding firewood, we were given a presentation about all of the different kinds of local wood at a recent woodworking club meeting. The presenter was someone who earns money by scouring the local firewood sellers. She locates the good hardwood chunks and burls, buys them as firewood and provides them to woodworkers and woodturners for bowls and other projects. She is also an expert on local wood species.
That’s a really cool expert to have around. Wish I knew of someone like that in my area.
 
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