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Hi, I want to build a bedroom set, but I know nothing about it other than what I am reading online, and I have some questions.

What is the best wood to use, and why? I want to use something that won't be too expensive, but will look nice with a good finish.

Is it better (easier) to start on the bed or the night stands?

Also, I will be buying all the tools for the job, and would like any advice in that area that anyone wants to give me. I have a drill, but will need a circular saw, a table and vise (can I use a sawhorse or is that dangerous with power tools?), sandpaper and files. Will I need a jigsaw? A sander?
 

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Disclaimer: I am newish to wood working so I am no expert but advise from a newb maybe what you are seeking. This is a pretty open ended question that can result in tons of information. Generally speaking about the wood if you want inexpensive and dont mind painting the wood as a finish then pine might be the way to go. Its hard to stain but its also a cheaper and widely available wood. You may get splintering on your cuts though. Oak is another option if you wish to stain but it can get pricey pretty quick. Another option is to build pine on the inside and use oak play on the outside but that may go beyond your skill level. As far as tools are concerned I can not say enough how much I love my table saw and router. Both do so much for really getting that extra level of technique down. You will definately need a sander. I would recomend watching videos about sanding as it is VERY IMPORTANT. I would actually say first figure out what you want to do and determine what you can do then you can get a full list of what you need. I would say a bed frame would be easiest to start with but you also need to make sure it can withstand the weight during use. This can involve anything from simple to very comlex joinery. I have no doubt in my mind that you are going to have thousands of questions along this process. Feel free to pm me if you like the advise from other newbs.
 

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I just finished my first chest of drawers. It took me about 2 months and cost me about $250 using the cheapest wood at Lowes. I can't even guess how much I've spent on tools. (at least $1000) I have found that I really love building stuff. (really odd since I've spent most of my life doing everything I could to avoid such a thing) If you think you'll like building things then get after it. If your wanting to build your own to save money it won't work. You'll end up spending more money on tools and wood than if you just went out and bought the set. On the other hand, once you buy the tools you've got what you need to build anything you want. The first thing you'll want to buy is the best table saw you can afford. You'll use it more than any other tool. Best of luck:thumbsup:
 

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I suggest you start with the easiest first; the end table. It's small enough for one person to handle, uses fewer materials and will teach you all you need to tackle the dresser. You wont learn much about bed construction, but you will have the tools collected by the time you're ready to begin.

Decide what style you want. Here are two end tables of completely different styles; the oak one is frame & panel and the painted one is built entirely from re-sawn framing lumber (done as a challenge). Oak one probably cost $40, while the pine one was from a discarded 2 X 8.





Or you could go crazy and make these...



Whatever you make, have fun and enjoy the process:yes:
 

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Johnny, I agree you should start out with an end table, I think your first major purchase would be a table saw. Probably going to need a router too. A bedroom suite is a major undertaking. Good luck.

Blade burner, I absolutely love the idea of resawn 2x8 into furniture, that table looks great!
 

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Hi, I want to build a bedroom set, but I know nothing about it other than what I am reading online, and I have some questions.

What is the best wood to use, and why? I want to use something that won't be too expensive, but will look nice with a good finish.

Is it better (easier) to start on the bed or the night stands?

Also, I will be buying all the tools for the job, and would like any advice in that area that anyone wants to give me. I have a drill, but will need a circular saw, a table and vise (can I use a sawhorse or is that dangerous with power tools?), sandpaper and files. Will I need a jigsaw? A sander?
I would suggest for basic shop tooling (machinery wise) would be a table saw, drill press, and a handheld circular saw. There are quite a few threads on this forum covering start up equipment, which would help you tremendously. You'll also find a need for a few hand held power tools, and a small array of just hand tools, like chisels, hand planes, screwdrivers, hammers, etc.

For starters I would draw out your items, and make a cut list for what you will need. Reason being if you use sheet stock, like hardwood plywood, and your items vary in size and quantity, you want to maximize material by cutting the largest pieces first.

For the lumber part, for whatever species you will be using, also do a cut list, so when you make up a materials list, all your lumber can be ordered at the same time, and hopefully from the same batch load so they will be closely matched. I would figure at least a 20% overage.

Once you start, and you will likely start on the night stands, you will have other questions. I would figure working and storage space you can dedicate to the items as they get cut up in parts, and need to be kept together. When you do assembly you'll need working space, and a bench of some sort.

Pieces that need finishing need to be done in an appropriate dust free area, and once parts are assembled, places to store them.






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here's a few things to coinsider

Regardless of which piece you choose to build first, here's the process that will apply:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/working-wood-3-part-process-12743/

A lot will depend on how and where your lumber comes from. If it's pre surfaced or rough sawn. Working with rough sawn requires more milling equipment or lots of handplaning. Milling machines like jointers, planers and a large table saw, and maybe a bandsaw.

Pre finished lumber or surfaced 4 sides, is ready to go as far as thickness and surface but will require cutting to length and width. Usually just a table saw and miter saw will suffice.

A router will make edges or profiles on the pieces. A router in a table is a lot easier to use when working with many pieces. It can be a dangerous tool if the work is not fed properly and held against the fence securely.

Joinery is a whole separate discussion. Butt joints, lap joints, dovetails, miters, splines, etc are all part of the process. You will have to "design" the piece to accommodate the joinery you are willing to use. Handmade joints or machine made joints are your choices.

Finishing the surface is also a whole 'nother discussion. Oil finish, paint, stains, shellac, lacquers, waterbased or polys are among your choices. Only practice will yield good results. Wipe on, brush on, roll on or spray with conventional guns or HVLP guns are the methods.

Now you can see why some here have said it 's a big project. :yes:
 
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