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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I am from Colorado and am looking to get into woodworking. Brand new to the whole scenario and am just starting to look for tools to begin to use. I plan on doing a variety of things. I have a small garage that comes with the apartment we rent so not much room for stuff...the major appliances will have to wait until we can get a house.

Right now I am just looking for the basics, like a good book to read about it, so I know which tools are good and how to begin at the basics and move on up.

Another question would be, a choice b/w miter or table saw and if miter saw (that is what i have been told to get from friends and family) is the Makita 10" LS1013FL a good one?

Thanks in advance
 

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Welcome to the forum LT!

There's a new book out from Tom Hintz, a regular who frequents many of these forums. I'm no longer a "newb" but I still liked his book alot.
The New Woodworker Handbook: The Basics for Spending Wisely, Working Safely, and Having Fun in Your Shop
51YlF2VON%2BL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg

I also like this one:
The Complete Book of Woodworking: Detailed Plans for More Than 40 Fabulous Projects
51EF1t0BDNL._AA240_.jpg

I think you're wise to get some info before spending alot on tools. Tom Hintz's book has lots of info about tools and tool buying. There's more than one way to skin a cat, so do what works best for you and your situation. The Makita CMS is very good, but I find a good TS more useful than my CMS. I can crosscut more accurately on my TS, plus it'll rip and do other tasks the CMS can't do. For my needs, the CMS is most useful for crosscutting boards that are too long for the TS, which doesn't happen too often. You're space constraints may not allow for a full size saw right now. You might check into one of the Festool guide circular saw systems, or similar.

A router may be worth some consideration depending on what you want to do...I find a router to be incredibly versatile.

Good luck and work safe!
 

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Welcome to the site Lthuff.
It looks like knotscott has got you on started down the right road.
You might also check out the other posts on this site. There is some really useful info.
 

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How ya doing Huff,

I'm kinda newbie to woodworking as well. Kinda the same situation too. Just starting to get tools and not alot of room. I have both a CMS and TS. Think I'd agree with Knotscott on this one. Get the TS first. I find myself turning to my TS much more then my CMS.
 

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Hey all, I am from Colorado and am looking to get into woodworking. Brand new to the whole scenario and am just starting to look for tools to begin to use. I plan on doing a variety of things. I have a small garage that comes with the apartment we rent so not much room for stuff...the major appliances will have to wait until we can get a house.

Right now I am just looking for the basics, like a good book to read about it, so I know which tools are good and how to begin at the basics and move on up.

Another question would be, a choice b/w miter or table saw and if miter saw (that is what i have been told to get from friends and family) is the Makita 10" LS1013FL a good one?

Thanks in advance
I have owned the Makita for 9 years now and have used it at work and at home and have found that I could not live with out it and in fact I just bought a new one so I could have a designated scms in the shop.
When I started getting into wood working seriously I found I needed both. Lots of times I have the Tablesaw set up for one thing but needed to cut something for other reasons.
So if you get a real good new or used table saw and a standard miter saw for cutting stock to length you are off to the races. You can always pick up a higher end miter saw if you find you need one down the road.
By the way don't forget to pick up a good double filter dust mask to keep that fine dust out of your lungs. Dust collection is another topic you should be reading about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
went ahead and ordered those books plus a couple more so hopefully they will get here within a wk or so from amazon
 

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I'm also a newby to this site. I've been a professional woodworker (cabinets, custon furniture, millwork, residential & commercial construction) for about 40 years. Love the taste of sawdust!!! It's in my blood.

I've both a table saw and mitresaw. If I had to choose one over the other I'd say go with the table saw. You can rip, crosscut and mitre on it. Just don't buy a cheapy. I've used the best in commercial saws (Powermatic, Delta etc.) Right now all I have is the Dewalt portable 10" saw and I absolutely love it. Paid $500.00 for it about 10 years ago. Never regretted a single dollar of the price. I'd recommend going slow on tool buying. Get one tool, learn all you can about its versatility, master it's use, then wisely consider your next purchase. Good quality tools will out last you and still do top notch work if properly maintained.

Happy sawdust trails to you.

art3427
 
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