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I had this chair that I had styled after George Nakashima's "Conoid" chair. True to his design I made the splats out of straight spindles, which weren't real cumfy. So I decided to replace the splats with some that had some lumbar support and the result was a very pleasant chair to sit in!

The chair seat was a one piece walnut chunk. Then I remembered I had another one piece chunk left over from the same tree and it occured to me that it might make a nice writing desk to go with the chair, a matched set if you will. The only problem was the piece I wanted to use for the one-piece desk desk top had a serious twist in it and the 5/4" thickness was not enough to work the twist out of it just by hand planing.

I began working on the desk top by attacking all the high corners with an assortment of hand planes, flipping in upside down, and right side up until I had both side planed and a thickness that I could live with. Even though I had planed the corners a little thinner than the rest of the top (not noticeably) there was still a very noticeable twist to it when I sighted across my winding sticks. I then rounded the ends of the top, which helped visually.

The most significant victory I made over the twist was a reverse cambered piece of tough hickory I installed on the bottom side of the desk top. I installed at an angle to try to force the two low corners up. I fastened it in place with three good sized screws space just 2" apart and near the center so as not to interfere with any movement of the wood. That was a big improvement. I dealt with the final 1/4" of twist by scribing the cantilevered support arms to fit the twist and it not very noticeable.

Anyway, here is the results of my efforts. You will notice the chair is a different color than the desk/table even though they utilized wood from the same tree. The chair has spent some time on my porch and has had some sun exposure.

P1250235.jpg

P1250239.jpg

The next photo was taken from below to show the cambered "twist fighter" I had to install.

P1250242.jpg

And finally, I thought you might get a kick out of my improvised, instant photo studio which consists of a roll of Tyvek I can pull down from the ceiling.

P1250241.jpg

Enjoy, Bret
 

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Sawing against the Wind
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Great build.....especially the magician trick of the "Floating" desk and chair....tyvek worked great...uuummm where's the red and blue writing??? Ours here in TN has DUPONT and TYVEK printed in large letters on one side....a pain to hide if backlit in anyway.

Trying to figure out this new format that keeps changing as I go to type and view....LOL.

I can't see that "design" twist from here in TN. "Well planned" as I would say!!!

As usual...KEEP up the nice work!! Enjoy your post!!
 

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Spectacular and inspiring!

I really appreciate you sharing your designs and build processes. Especially your methods for overcoming the "challenges" presented by certain pieces of wood.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great build.....especially the magician trick of the "Floating" desk and chair....tyvek worked great...uuummm where's the red and blue writing??? Ours here in TN has DUPONT and TYVEK printed in large letters on one side....a pain to hide if backlit in anyway.

Trying to figure out this new format that keeps changing as I go to type and view....LOL.

I can't see that "design" twist from here in TN. "Well planned" as I would say!!!

As usual...KEEP up the nice work!! Enjoy your post!!
There is printing on the Tyvek but I used the backside and photo at night so no light comes through it.
 

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As always beautiful work and unique design. Very nice use of the wood too. Interesting to learn how you fixed the problems you had. I would have thrown away the pieces and started over before even thinking about fixes like that. Well done :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
As always beautiful work and unique design. Very nice use of the wood too. Interesting to learn how you fixed the problems you had. I would have thrown away the pieces and started over before even thinking about fixes like that. Well done :thumbsup:
Thank you. I could never throw away such a beautiful piece of wood. I was thinking that if all else failed I would rip it into three or four pieces, take the twist out of each piece and then glue it back together which I have had to do in the past. I really didn't want to see any glue joints in this top.

Bret
 

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Master firewood maker
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really cool. what is the joinery used for the feet of the chair?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
really cool. what is the joinery used for the feet of the chair?
Thanks

A full through M & T for max glue surface. I guess I could have made a double full through which would have provided even more glue surface but it's strong as he%# the way it is!

Bret
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Brett, beautiful work as always. The two pieces compliment each other very nicely. On the reversed camber did you notice the hickory being strong enough to bring the top down, or was it a combination of the two? Meaning the top coming down and the "twist fighter" going up.
Either way, very nice, and very clean lines.
 

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Dude, are you kidding me?!?! Those are amazing pieces of functional art! What joinery attaches the seat to the legs?

Thanks for posting.
 

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Maker of sawdust
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Nice looking pieces clean contemporary My only concern might be is that the legs lack a stringer for side to side movement. Otherwise nice piece.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Nice looking pieces clean contemporary My only concern might be is that the legs lack a stringer for side to side movement. Otherwise nice piece.
Thanks,

You must be talking about the chair lacking any stretchers. The table has a fairly hefty wedged through M & T. The table would be lacking in lateral rigidity if used for hand planing lumber but is stable enough for a writing desk. I wanted to make it as delicate as I could but still keep it sturdy. Sometimes there is a fine line to walk there. The chair, however, is rock solid. The legs are sufficiently stout to provide plenty of lateral support. Below the seat the legs are near the size of a 2 x 4. It has been in use around my place for a few years now and shows no sign of fatigue other than the suntan.

Bret
 
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