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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been on the lookout for my first decent table saw for quite sometime. A Delta Unisaw came up on craigslist that I am interested in. I live in rural northern MN so my options are kinda limited when it comes to Craigslist. He is asking $500.

Model: Delta 87-369

This one is about two hours away.

http://stcloud.craigslist.org/tls/4073455075.html

It has a 5hp motor, 3480rpm and from the research I have done is 230/480V although it is a 3ph. I know I would need the converter. I am currently renting a house where there is no available 220V in the garage where I work. However I am planning on building my own home with a shop within the next couple years. I am 24 years old and want a saw that will last me my life time. Is this it or should I wait? I am a new woodworker :blush: and although this may sound ridiculous, is this too much saw for me? :eek:
 

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I would pass. As a new woodworker that saw can get you in real trouble pretty quick. 5 hp will kick pretty hard. Also...a 3 phase machine is a fair amount more cost associated with a phase converter that will power 5hp. And lastly....storing the saw on end? I think the saws abused.

Keep watching.
 

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+1 with Ryan. Keep watching.

I would not purchase a tool which you will not be able to use until you purchase a house. That may be a couple of years, or stuff happens and your purchase is delayed. I hope not, but if things happened, this is not an easy saw to sell.

I would look out for a hybrid like the Craftsman 22124 or one of the Rigid, or even a job site size saw and build a mobile table around it. At least you would be able to use a 120V tool in the meantime, and likely be able to sell it when you have 240V power and can upgrade.
 

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It looks like a lot of saw for $500, but the converter and need for 220v are quite a burden for a first saw. Might be easier to sell the 3 phase motor and replace it.

This saw is priced a bit high, but if they'd take less, for ~$250 you'd have a good full size belt drive starter saw with an upgraded fence that'll run on a standard 120v circuit.

This one is also ~ $100 overpriced IMO, but it's another solid option for a good saw to get your feet wet.

Never hurts to make a reasonable offer....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I really appreciate all the responses guys I will take your advice and hold out for a decent saw at a good price. I did e-mail the guy about the jet saw last week but he never got back to me... I did not see that craftsman but I agree it is a little over priced.

I thought about picking up the rigid R4512 from home Depot but I have a really hard time buying anything new from the big box stores. I would rather get a nice pre-owned item and get more value for my dollar. So it looks like I will just have to hold out until something comes up

Yes I did check with him and he confirmed it is a 3phase motor.

thanks again guys! :thumbsup:
 

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I've been using delta 10" contractor saws professionally since I was your age.

I guess it depends on what you're going to do with it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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A standard 10" table saw is a good place to start

That's what I started with 50 years ago and I still have some old Craftsman saws and a nice new 10" Hybrid with a 1 3/4 HP motor. Too much power, like a real 3 HP or worse yet a 5 HP can kick like a mule IF you don't know what you are doing. Better to start out smaller with less power, but it will still kickback.

Here's the deal as I see it. You won't need 3 HP unless you are cutting 3" hardwood for hours on end. A 1 3/4 HP or even a true 1 HP will be adequate for most woodworking projects, especially sheets or panels 3/4". A standard contractor's saw with an "outboard" motor can always be upgraded as I did and put a 2 HP Baldor motor on the old Craftsman. It ripped up a storm! I dedicated it to ripping only and removed the side extensions.

The other important aspects of a table saw and it's efficiency are the fence and the blade. Both need to be properly matched for the saw and the material. The fence is the heart of the table saw, because it's the one thing you are constantly adjusting to make your cuts. The blade usually stays on for long periods of time. The fence should be "self squaring" and return to parallel to the miter slots each time its moved and locked down. Measuring twice gets real old if you have the type of fence that won't self align.

When you get real familiar with the table saw and find the need to upgrade to furniture making and require more power, then a cabinet saw will be your next purchase.
 
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I stand with woodnthings on this one. I purchased a 1 3/4hp cabinet saw 12 years ago (Jet's small cabinet saw) and it is serving me well. I have cut 2" thick hardwoods but most of the time I'm working dimensional woods. The 2+ inch woods are cut a bit slower and in the 12 years I think the reset button has had to be pushed 3 times. I like being in control of the saw. I simply need to switch a couple of wires around to increase the hp on my saw but I never will.

As for buying a saw - you already have good advise here - wait and buy something good when you have your own place...
 

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new table saw

Get the Walker Turner if it is still available. I had a Walker Turner 14" saw when I had my business and it was a work horse like you can't believe. When I went back to amateur status I bought a Powermatic 66 and love it. The Walker Turner was just too big for a home shop and was three phase. That Walker Turner was also made in America
when they made them well. My Powermatic was one of the last to be made in America. When I had my business we boasted "Made in America, by Americans, using American tools," you would be hard pressed to find enough American made tools to run a shop today unless you buy used.

Good Luck,

Bandman
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all of the replies it has really helped out a lot! I did see that Walker Turner a couple of days ago by passed it up because I had never heard of it (dumb but I am learning). I did a little more research on it based on your suggestions and finally called the guy. It is still available and it is a single phase but it is a 220V. I am married into a family of electricians so I think they could rig me something up. Either way much easier than dealing with both a three phase and 220v.

But it is all cast iron and has two belts and upgraded fence. I think I am going to go with this one it is about two hours away if I have time this weekend. I really appreciate all the input! I will post pics when I pick it up and hopefully get some restoration advice from you guys.
 

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Many motors can be wired for either 110 or 220 vot by changing the connections in the motor. However, you will have much better performance with 220 volts than you will with 110 volts. If you have electricians in the family it should be pretty easy to add a 220 volt cicruit and breaker to supply the saw.

Gerry
 

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Thanks for all of the replies it has really helped out a lot! I did see that Walker Turner a couple of days ago by passed it up because I had never heard of it (dumb but I am learning). I did a little more research on it based on your suggestions and finally called the guy. It is still available and it is a single phase but it is a 220V. I am married into a family of electricians so I think they could rig me something up. Either way much easier than dealing with both a three phase and 220v.

But it is all cast iron and has two belts and upgraded fence. I think I am going to go with this one it is about two hours away if I have time this weekend. I really appreciate all the input! I will post pics when I pick it up and hopefully get some restoration advice from you guys.
aren't walker turner TSs the ones that have that funky table top where the blade elevates up through a slot in the top that's only about 1/2" wide and doesn't allow for the use of a ZCI?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
aren't walker turner TSs the ones that have that funky table top where the blade elevates up through a slot in the top that's only about 1/2" wide and doesn't allow for the use of a ZCI?
I was reading about that, isn't it the throat plate that is narrower? I can figure out a way around it I'm sure... Other people still use them
 
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