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I recently bought a miter saw and am getting ready to undertake some wood projects.I have a circular saw and a few other basic tools and some limited work work experience. I would like to build a new dining room table for my mother as a Christmas gift for her. I want to follow this table http://ana-white.com/2013/09/plans/4x4-truss-beam-table but for the life of me I don't understand how they are connecting all the 4x4's together. The plan says they are using a kreg jig and I am going to be purchasing one but I thought they only work with 2x wood? Pretty much if someone could break down to me how to connect these 4x4's together so the joints are secure. Any advice is greatly appreciated. --Apparently my 10" miter saw isn't big enough to cut the angles needed in the 4x4's so back to the drawing board I guess.
 

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That table is held together with only pocket screws? Not the way I'd do it. I would use mortise and tenons to join the pieces. You also have flush cuts on the breadboard ends and they are relying on pocket screws and glue to keep that together. The wood will swell and break it apart. Maybe it's just me, but I'm a bit skeptical about the durability of that build.
 

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That table is held together with only pocket screws? Not the way I'd do it. I would use mortise and tenons to join the pieces. You also have flush cuts on the breadboard ends and they are relying on pocket screws and glue to keep that together. The wood will swell and break it apart. Maybe it's just me, but I'm a bit skeptical about the durability of that build.
I don't know enough about wood working to doubt your skepticism, so I believe you. The mortise and tenons joints are very nice, how does that work with 4x4's though? The only video I've seen was with smaller cuts then 2x4's is it the same principle? Do you have any recommendations for a different table that I could build maybe similar in style? It does not have to be the same just nice looking for out kitchen.
 

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+1 with Julie. Mortise and tenon is the best joint. Maybe through tenon with pins if you want to get fancy.

Mortise and tenon can be used on any size lumber. Lots of examples in post and beam construction.

The large bread board ends with glue and pocket screws is going to cause a problem as Julie mentioned. I would go with narrower bread board ends, with ideally a dovetail tenon and dovetail mortise in the breadboard ends with e.g., screw to keep the breadboard end centred. It may need some support from underneath due to potential load from someone pressing or attempting to sit on the end.

Search for other threads for examples of hand cut mortise and tenons. This is one example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/workbench-build-unplugged-write-up-pictures-included-54721/
 

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I don't know enough about wood working to doubt your skepticism, so I believe you. The mortise and tenons joints are very nice, how does that work with 4x4's though? The only video I've seen was with smaller cuts then 2x4's is it the same principle? Do you have any recommendations for a different table that I could build maybe similar in style? It does not have to be the same just nice looking for out kitchen.
Not sure what you have in the way of tools, other than what you mentioned, or how much you have budgeted to buy new tools but mortise and tenons can be made with hand saws and chisels. It just takes some work and patience. The size of the lumber doesn't matter, hand tools will work regardless.

You may want to Google videos on trestle tables and how to make a mortise and tenon. Then get some scrap lumber and practice. And then go back to the videos to see what needs improvement.

I Googled simple trestle tables and found some that were good for novices but maybe not quite in the heirloom category. You have to decide if you want to just build it or make something that may last a lifetime. The latter takes time.

That table in the link you provided in your original post was made with construction lumber. That's great for practice but not for formal dining rooms. I'd suggest red oak as the cheapest lumber to consider. Mahogany or cherry would be ideal for anything in the heirloom category, but it will cost a lot more than $100.

This is a pretty interesting video because it shows you what's going on inside the wood when cutting a mortise:
 
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