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As the message says I'm new to this forum. I am a very active woodturner, been turning for 20 years or more and doing a lot of flat work before that. I write articles from time to time for the various turning magazines and currently serve as tips editor for American Woodturner. If you have any good tips send for turners send them to [email protected] and I'll check them over and send them on to the editor.
I'll be glad to answer any questions I can. I do just about every style of turning and I'm always trying something new. Right now I'm learning to cut threads in wood using the Baxter thread cutter from Bestwoodtools. You never really know what's coming off my lathe.
I am a full time photographer for Tennessee Tech University and often teach how to shoot art work so if you have any questions along that line I'll try to help out.
 

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Welcome Aboard John

Welcome aboard John, I read many of your posts on the other forum you are active on. I know for a fact you can help a lot of us new turners. While I am writing you, can I be the first to ask you a question? Do you have any experience with with the Jamieson deep hollowing system? Good or, not so good? Thanks Mitch
 

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Mitch I have a homemade version of the Jamieson system. It's pretty good but has some limitations. You need at least one curved bar to be able to reach all areas of some shaped vessels. On my last one I had to mount a cutter sideways to reach the areas but that was kind of unusual.
If your not comfortable with an armbrace stye hollowing then I would definitely say go for one of the captured bar systems. I don't own one yet but the Elbow system is very quick to install and works very well. I can't talk about it yet but there is a system coming out soon that is better than the elbow system. They are in the patent filing stages so it could be anywhere from 6 months to a year or longer.
Lyle jamieson shows you how to build one of his systems on his website. maybe you can find it by doing a web search. I prefer the John Jordan boring bars for the system. They allow you to reach more areas and work very well if you do need to use them hand held. The cutters are 3/16" are cheap to buy and easy to replace.
I am currently trying out the Hunter tools on the end of my Jordan tools. These are sweet and never need sharpening. It is the perfect thing if you do Vases and things that need sanding inside. If you hold the cutter at the proper angle you get a finish that can easily be sanded with 180 or 220.
 

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Thanks John

Thanks for answering my reply John. I have been doing some vases etc with small hole access and started likeing doing them. The Hunter cutter you mentioned, I went to woodcraft and was going to buy one when a friend of mine there told me about the Jamieson system and showed me the video. I was impressed to the point that I want one. He has a jumbo bar with a bent cutter holder where you can cut the insides with. Going to look for his website if he tells you how to build his system. Thanks again and glad to see your being active on this forum. We need guys like yourself on this site. I have just been turning about 10 months , but the bug bites hard. Been a woodworker all my life. If you get a chance, look in my gallery to see some of my work. There are seven pages of pictures there.:thumbsup: Would appreciate it if you did. Mitch
 

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Welcome from a new woodturner. I didn't even know they had magazines just for woodturning. I have been a machinest for quite a few years but have just started the wood turning this year. I do miss my saddle and post sometimes when I am turning wood. I have been trying some carbide that I use on metal for the woodturning. Carbide inserts for metal does not have a sharp edge like wood working tools. They have a very slight rolled edge. So I have to touch the edges up for the wood working. But I can see carbide woodturning tools going a long way.

Mike
 
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