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Hello all,

Happy New Year !!

Just put my new Ridgid TS 3650 to the test. You folks are correct, a good table saw makes all the difference. I had been using a Delta bench top saw.

Is there a rule of thumb regarding how often to change a table saw blade. Woodworking is a hobby for me, I use a lot of Oak. Do you make the blade change based on board feet you have cut? How can you tell when the blade needs changed? The saw currently has a Ridgid 40 Tooth carbide tipped blade. Thanks again for all the help.


Joe
 

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Edge life of the blade depends on a lot of things....usage, thickness, density, moisture content, technique, cleaning habits, saw alignment, etc., so there's not really a useful rule of thumb. I tend to get 1 to 2 years from my blades as a hobbyist, but I rotate a lot of them in and out, clean them often, plus I don't cut much during winter. A dirty blade will dull faster than a clean one due to added heat. It's more likely to need a cleaning than resharpening...clean them often with any degreaser or citrus cleaner and stiff nylon or brass brush. Any time the blade's burning or lugging is an indication of needing a cleaning or possibly resharpening.

If you're using the stock blade, I'd suggest saving that for junk wood and non-critical cuts. That saw is better than the stock blade and will benefit from a better one.
 

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I also rotate between several blades. I don't really have a timetable I use. When the material starts to become difficult to push through I change to a new blade.
I guess I should start cleaning my blades to make them last longer.
 

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knotscot is right on the money. Use the stock blade for cutting scrap only. Invest around $100 on a good all-purpose blade and you will get a much better cut and even increased power. I have the exact same saw and I bought a Ridge Carbide blade (see link below). It is the best blade I have ever used.

http://www.ridgecarbidetool.com/pro...id=33&osCsid=376fe54a7c1016a409c0ee61f8db0028

Also, when your blades do get dull you don't need to replace them. If it is a good blade that you paid a lot for I'd get it re-sharpened. :thumbsup:
 

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How much more usage would you expect to get from a top- of- the line ..carbide tipped vs a cheaper blade?

It's not how much longer it last but how much better of a cut that you get. I had what I thought was a decent cutting blade for a cheap blade. I then invested $100.00 for a Freud Premier/Fusion General Purpose blade it's like 100 times better and faster cut. It leaves a perfect no sanding needed cut ripping or cross cutting in both plywood or solid, oak, birch, maple, purple heart ect. I plan on getting a good 24 tooth ripping blade also just in-case I need to rip something thicker than 1 1/2". I also have a Freud 80 tooth cross cutting blade for my RAS that cost around $50.00 but it is worth the money. This is in my opinion good advise that I got on here some months ago, It's worth the extra money.
 
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