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I have been using an inexpensive skill 10" compound miter saw and have liked it but I'm getting sick of its lack of cutting capacity. I use my miter saw constantly and would use a sliding saw even more so I wouldn't have a problem putting some cash into this for good quality. I have seen sliding miter saws ranging from $150 to $1,200 and am having a hard time seeing a significant difference. I have read positive reviews of the Kobalt 10-in Slide Compound Miter Saw ($200) but need some suggestions for what to look for in a sliding miter saw. It would be mostly used for furniture making.
 

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I can’t make any suggestion because I’m still using my little Craftsman saw and I’m in the same boat as you. I’ve never had any problems but I always think about buying another saw. Not sure if I actually need to or not.

So today I bought a Freud d1080x Diablo for my miter saw, but after looking at the miter saw, I’m having second thoughts. I’m just wondering if it’s just too much of a blade for my little Craftsman saw.

I also looked at some of the better miter saws at Home Depot and I’m not terribly impressed. But I would like know if there is much a difference in accuracy between the high priced saws and the average ones. The sliding saw just seem to me that they would be more prone to getting out of whack, but I don’t know that.
 

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I have had several miter saws, started with an 8 inch, then a 10 and now I use a 12 inch. The 12 gives more versatility in cutting bigger boards. I didn't go with a sliding, there are more chances for something to get out of sync or parts to wear out. Here is what I got, I have cut hundreds of 2x4s and flooring with it. I replaced the blades only once and it is a tank. Runs great and no issues.
Amazon.com: DEWALT DW715 15-Amp 12-Inch Compound Miter saw: Home Improvement
 

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I have a Craftsman 10" sliding, single bevel saw that I bought 7 or 8 years ago. I paid under $200 on sale. It can still be bought for less than $200.

It has done everything I wanted it to do. Never needed/wanted more capacity. Several years ago I put a new finer tooth blade on it and works even better than new. Just takes a little more work when cutting things like crown molding because of the way it only tilts to one side.

George
 

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RAM Man
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Unless you're constantly tossing your miter saw into the bed of a truck day after day there really is no reason for it to get out of alignment easily. A yearly or so alignment check up for any saw is always a good idea anyways. For many years a 10" regular CMS was what I had in the shop and constantly was frustrated with the limited sawing capacities it provided that it got to the point that I hardly used it at all. Then I purchased the Makita LS1016L and have been a happy camper ever since.
 
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Sawdust Creator
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I've had a few saws now, and can say the better saws do have better accuracy. One thing I and many others have found is often the fences are not straight, and some persuasion will be needed to get them to perfectly straight. This isn't an issue in framing, deck building, ect, however in furniture building 1/64 off will show. This issue only manifests itself on cuts where the board doesn't span both ends of the fence....like trimming ends of boards.

It's my opinion that there is a distinct difference in quality between a 200 dollar saw and a 450 dollar saw ( think kobalt to hitachi slider) and an even more noticeable difference between 200 and 700 ( think kobalt to Bosch glider). Now that said, only you can determine what level you need to buy to.
 

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A few year ago, I did quite a bit of research into SCMSs and found that the Makita LS1016L was the best for the price and quality and accuracy. It runs about $500. I didn't buy it because of funds, but if I could get one, that'd be it.
 

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Hunter
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First, even if a slider might have more opportunity to get out of alignment than a non-slider, which introduces more error, a cut that is slightly out of alignment or trying to make two cuts match perfectly? But the fact is that once any saw is tuned, it will stay that way until something moves it out of place. That usually takes a pretty good whack.

If you are regularly making cuts that exceed the capacity of your saw, then a saw that will do that job better is probably worth it for you.

Now, which saw should you get? That depends on your budget and what features you want in a saw. Go play with them at the store and compare.

Hunter
 
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