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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Back in April, we put up a good size pole shed. I am framing up a portion to use as my shop. Obviously, I am pretty excited! I have never had a space to use as a dedicated shop. The space is about 11' x 25' with a 36" entry door on one of the 11' sides.

I am looking for any info regarding things you would have done different when building your shop. No, making it bigger isn't one of my options. :smile:

I am also looking at suggestions for keeping warm during the winter months. I am leaning away from a wood burner for several reasons but other suggestions are welcome.

Thanks for the help!
 

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I'm waiting for ideas. I am still planning a new shop building.
One thing I would recommend, is an entrance larger than 36" for getting large stuff in and out.

A few questions I have are.
What material to use for the ceiling? Stand alone shop, not attached to house)
What material for walls?

Just curious, why a pole barn, as opposed to stick built? Will you have a concrete slab floor?
 

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I would put in a bigger door. Even if it's 2 doors side by side. That way you can easily carry big heavy machines and sheet goods into the shop.

As for heating the shop, there have a couple recent threads on this that were pretty good.
Some people swear by electric heaters and others like wood stoves.
If you heat your house with wood, I would lean towards that because you already have to do it, splitting a couple more facecord won't be a big deal. But as you get older, that might change.
If you want to put in electric heaters, you might want to run them on their own breaker for a couple reasons. Your not tying up your outlets all winter and you won't have them sucking power away from other machines.
And in the warm months, you'll have a few more outlets, which we all seem to need!
 

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Agreed on the larger door!!!! A double doors a nice option. The woodburner makes a lot of sense in a wood shop where you can fuel it with cutoff waste....but check with your insurance to make sure they'll cover it. Paint the walls white...the brighter the better. Personally if it were me the walls would be steel panels for ease of cleaning and durability, if not steel, then drywall.


Lots and lots of outlets including ceiling drops and plenty of lights.
 

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Another thing I forgot to mention that should be considered is dust collection.
Would you want to have your lines run inside te wall or along the ceiling? Or will you just move the DC around to different machines.

White walls make a big difference!
You might want to have lights every 5 feet of so. That way there won't be any shadows or dark areas.
 

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I just had to upgrade electrical service in my shop. If you haven't planned for 240v, you should consider adding it anyway. Having 240V circuits opens up a lot of possibilities for larger machines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm waiting for ideas. I am still planning a new shop building.
One thing I would recommend, is an entrance larger than 36" for getting large stuff in and out.

A few questions I have are.
What material to use for the ceiling? Stand alone shop, not attached to house)
What material for walls?

Just curious, why a pole barn, as opposed to stick built? Will you have a concrete slab floor?
I was worried about the door opening also. I will make sure to allow for a wider opening.

To answer your question above - My family really need a pole barn for storage. I needed someplace to put toys in the off-season (camper, motorcycle, etc). That was the only way I would ever have room for a dedicated shop. Part of the shed (including my shop) has a poured concrete floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just had to upgrade electrical service in my shop. If you haven't planned for 240v, you should consider adding it anyway. Having 240V circuits opens up a lot of possibilities for larger machines.
I had a dedicated 200 amp box installed for the shed/shop. I have an electrician buddy and he will help me prep for 240V.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Agreed on the larger door!!!! A double doors a nice option. The woodburner makes a lot of sense in a wood shop where you can fuel it with cutoff waste....but check with your insurance to make sure they'll cover it. Paint the walls white...the brighter the better. Personally if it were me the walls would be steel panels for ease of cleaning and durability, if not steel, then drywall.


Lots and lots of outlets including ceiling drops and plenty of lights.
I had thought about getting some reclaimed barn wood for the walls but maybe I should just drywall and paint white...

I will add plenty of lights.

Thanks!
 

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shop needs

I would start with a small work bench about 4 feet wide and 20" deep, slightly elevated above normal counter height. where it would be comfortable for you to work with small parts and odd "stuff". Then you need a workwork bench/assembly table in the middle of the room. I found that a big long work bench along a wall is of little use other than collecting junk and taking up valuable floor space. Lights on two circuits and machinery on other circuits. My shop is about the same size as you describe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Regarding heaters, if you decide to go electrical, I was once advised that 220v units are more efficient, if I recall. Can't explain why, I'm afraid.
Someone else just told me that, too! I asked an electrician about it and he said it is an old wives tale.
 

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whatalesyou1 said:
Someone else just told me that, too! I asked an electrician about it and he said it is an old wives tale.
I've also herd that but can't say either way. I'd listen to the electrician.

I do know that the 220v will run on half the amps as the 110v so the motor won't get as hot and should last longer.
 

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I suspect that myth is based on a misunderstanding of electricity by someone a long while ago
 

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I had thought about getting some reclaimed barn wood for the walls but maybe I should just drywall and paint white...

I will add plenty of lights.

Thanks!
Wood shop - wooden walls. If your building codes allow for it, use plywood for the walls or shiplapped boards. This will allow you to mount practically anything anywhere. :thumbsup:

Besides, who likes taping drywall? :laughing:
 

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door - my shop door is 36 inches and I've had no problems at all for 12 years. If I built anything wider, I wouldn't be able to get it into the house (most homes). Doors invite drafts and you being in Wisconsin know this.

As for heat - I live in NH ans have a wall mounted gas "space heater". It works fine for my 24' X 24' shop here in NH (and it doesn't even have a blower to distribute the heat. The unit is wall vented which was a deciding factor for me. If I had installed a wood stove, I would've had to build a chimney. An added chimney would change the "barn" status to a "residence" status seriously affecting my property tax bill.

As suggested, a nice small workbench is a must. Considering your space limitations, I would forgo the finish bench. When I built my shop, I sat in the empty space and tried to feel myself working in it. I visualized a work flow that included a bench, table saw, router table, drill press, band saw and a few workstations for sharpening etc. My table saw does everything a miter saw does so I never had room for the miter saw.

Just sit in the empty space and feel it. I've changed my set up at least a dozen times and all of them were perfect. Have fun
 

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White steel liner panel for the ceiling, plywood painted white for the walls that way you can hang whatever you want anywhere also they will take more abuse than drywall. Lots of outlets as well
 

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Drywall or steel wall panels provide some level of fire protection/resistance. They would be my preference in a shop atmosphere
 
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