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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there everyone....

I just recently got a new table saw and was applying protection to the top and wanted to make sure I hadn't made a mistake... I didn't wait very long at all after applying a final wipe down with degreaser (orange power plus) before applying the T9 to dry for the night. I basically did them immediately back to back (sprayed and wiped down with rag) Should I have waited long after wiping down with the degreaser before applying and rubbing in the T9?

Sorry if it seems silly, but I'm sure anyone who's ever received a new toy like this knows exactly how I feel. Thanks,
jacob
 

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It does not hurt to apply some kind of protective film on the cast iron surfaces at any time.

Cast iron will only start to rust if there is contact with water, as in a certain nephew of mine putting a cold soda can on my jointer table, or if the relative humidity of the air is very high, as in close to condensing which happens if a shop is unheated in the winter.

I have used Boeshield T9. it works well. Other products will also work such as WD-40, and the good old Johnsons Paste Wax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Guess I was worried about trapping the degreaser underneath the boeshield or making the boeshield ineffective somehow by mixing it with residual degreaser.... Thanks for the piece of mind Dave!
 

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FYI, any protective film is going to wear off over time, so do not be surprised. Hard to say how long.

If I notice rust stains I will clean off and re-apply. Rust stains can easily be caused perspiration in the warmer/humid months. Happens to me. I leave the shop and everything looks good. The next day I may see a rust stain. Very superficial. Not a problem to clean up at this stage.

I use this product to remove the rusts stain and then re-apply a protective film. I saw this at Lee Valley, but I am told it may be available in local auto parts stores. Popular with the auto crowd for polishing chrome.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=67014&cat=1,43415,43439,67014

I also work with "green" wood for turning. I found out the hard way that I cannot leave this wood on a cast iron surface for any period. It will begin to cause rust stains in minutes. Cut a piece on the band saw, took the piece to the lathe, left the rest on the bandsaw table with the intent to clean up later. Bad move.

Now I clean up immediately and then wipe down with WD-40 which displaces any moisture, hence the abbreviation "WD" as in Water Displacement, formula 40.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm planning to throw some paste wax on today now that the light coat of boeshield has dried... I'm thinking that'll be good and I'll setup a google calendar reminder to reapply the wax a few months from now and the boeshield after 6 months or so. Thanks for the tip on the rust removal and the green wood!
 

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You do not need to use Boeshield and paste wax, just one or the other.

Many people prefer paste wax. Personal preference.

FYI, if you do use wax, make sure it does not contain silicon. Trace amounts of silicon will be picked up by the wood and cause issues with future staining or finishing.

Good old Johnsons Paste Wax does not contain silicon. I have had my can for decades.

If you want to wipe the cast surfaces clean prior to re-applying any protective film, just use mineral spirits or acetone.

If you use WD-40, this can clean and protect in one step.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I see, guess I'm going overboard... Yeah I've got some johnsons that I was putting on my previous saw. I had heard boeshield can be tacky and so some people throw a coat of wax over the top.
 

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I use J-wax, more for making the workpieces slide easily than to protect the cast iron. It works well on wood to wood surfaces too such as the out feed table.

I live in a really dry climate. Rust isn't much of a factor even with things left outside.

Bret
 

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Alan Sweet
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Years ago I found that WD-40 makes an excellent degreaser. And it cleans up great. Takes off all the goopy stuff that arrive on new equipment.
 
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