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My wife has decided i can purchase a new router. Any idea on what type i should get. I have a very old craftsman router that finally stop working. I really don't want a craftsman because the quality is really not what it use to be in my opinion. Any help would be greatly appreciated
My skill level is novice . Just start using a router more . Any help would be greatly appreciated . If it help i have a rockler router table that need a router installed. I got it at auction .
 

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I own the Bosch 1617evspk unit and have been very happy with it. It has both the fixed and plunge base. I leave the fix base in my table, and swap out the motor to plunge when I need a hand held. This unit is pricey, but well worth the money, it is a top end model.

Bosch 1617EVSPK 12 Amp 2-1/4-Horsepower Plunge and Fixed Base Variable Speed Router Kit with 1/4-Inch and 1/2-Inch Collets - Amazon.com


Regardless of which model/brand you get, your rockler table will accept just about any router, but there are a few things that need to be checked off your list. First - since it will be table mounted, needs to be at least 2 hp or above. Your not using a lift, needs to be above table adjustable. If you have a choice, always go with 1/2 shanks for bits, one that does both 1/4 and 1/2 is better. Make sure it capable of working in both fixed and plunge base even if you never plan to use it for plunge base or buy the plunge base. Going to be cheaper in the future should you need plunge base to just buy a plunge base when you need it, as opposed to buying a new router. Unless you plan to have two router, some people do.
 

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John
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My wife has decided i can purchase a new router. Any idea on what type i should get. I have a very old craftsman router that finally stop working. I really don't want a craftsman because the quality is really not what it use to be in my opinion. Any help would be greatly appreciated
My skill level is novice . Just start using a router more . Any help would be greatly appreciated . If it help i have a rockler router table that need a router installed. I got it at auction .
If you have a very old Craftsman router, this is a good thing.:yes:
The new versions of Craftsman routers, the ones designed and built by Chervon, offer a very good value although the fit and finish may not be as good as the more expensive routers. I have two Craftsman routers, one ~ 35 years old that is virtually impossible to adjust height closer than 1/8" and one about a year old that is very pleasant to use.
For a higher end router, I agree with the Bosch 1617 or MRC 23 as being excellent choices, the MRC 23 being a bit on the heavy side though. Others to look into are the Triton, Milwaukee or Hitachi M12VC. Triton having arguably the best dust collection and easily table adaptable, Milwaukee is also easily table adaptable and has a generally top notch reputation and Hitachi as likely the quietest of any available. I haven't been terribly impressed with Porter Cable in terms of value since Black and Decker/Stanley bought the flag a couple of years ago.
Probably the best way to choose a router is to handle as many different ones as possible and try to determine which is most comfortable to handle. Test the weight, ease of access to controls such as power switch and plunge lock(if equipped) as well as ease of height and speed adjustments. You also want to see how easy it is to change bits. While some prefer the two wrench system and others prefer a single wrench and collet lock, I find little difference in the mechanics involved but a self releasing collet is a definite advantage. Variable speed is also a big plus and, IMO, a requirement. :smile:

EDIT - Any idea what router your table is drilled for??
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
jschaben said:
If you have a very old Craftsman router, this is a good thing.:yes:
The new versions of Craftsman routers, the ones designed and built by Chervon, offer a very good value although the fit and finish may not be as good as the more expensive routers. I have two Craftsman routers, one ~ 35 years old that is virtually impossible to adjust height closer than 1/8" and one about a year old that is very pleasant to use.
For a higher end router, I agree with the Bosch 1617 or MRC 23 as being excellent choices, the MRC 23 being a bit on the heavy side though. Others to look into are the Triton, Milwaukee or Hitachi M12VC. Triton having arguably the best dust collection and easily table adaptable, Milwaukee is also easily table adaptable and has a generally top notch reputation and Hitachi as likely the quietest of any available. I haven't been terribly impressed with Porter Cable in terms of value since Black and Decker/Stanley bought the flag a couple of years ago.
Probably the best way to choose a router is to handle as many different ones as possible and try to determine which is most comfortable to handle. Test the weight, ease of access to controls such as power switch and plunge lock(if equipped) as well as ease of height and speed adjustments. You also want to see how easy it is to change bits. While some prefer the two wrench system and others prefer a single wrench and collet lock, I find little difference in the mechanics involved but a self releasing collet is a definite advantage. Variable speed is also a big plus and, IMO, a requirement. :smile:

EDIT - Any idea what router your table is drilled for??
No there a blue top plate and 4 screws on the bottom
 

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John
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No there a blue top plate and 4 screws on the bottom
Could be any of several routers. No matter, plates are easily redrilled and the extra holes (if any) are of no real consequence.:smile:
 

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You may want to rethink the craftsman routers, specifically the 2.5 hp craftsman pro model. It can be had usually for 145 with plunge and standard base. Dollar for dollar....I think it's the best router on the market now. One of the woodworking mags thought so too a little while back ( can't remember which one but the issue is sitting on my coffee table). It's got above the table adjustments, slow start motor, and is variable speed. It's survived falling off my workbench no less than twice, unscathed and has the power to rip through hard maple with a door bit set in one pass no problem. I hands down would buy another....any day of the week. ( it's one of the gems still left in the craftsman line)
 

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For use in a table, be sure to get variable speed. I'd also look to 1/2" shank capacity. Top side adjustability features are nice for table use too. Milwaukee, Bosch, PC, DW, Freud, Hitachi, Makita, Triton, and others all have great choices. Generally more power is beneficial, but usually costs more and makes them more cumbersome for hand use. Pic what you like.

Not trying to talk you into anything, but if you're on a tight budget, the new Cman routers actually get pretty good marks....I'm almost certain they're better than the old Ryobi made plastic routers they made for Sears. There's very little in common between the new and old Sears routers except for the name and the retail establishment.
 

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The old ryobi made craftsmans and new chevron built craftsmans are essentially like comparing a 1983 pickup and a 2014....and saying well their both fords....
 

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I'm sure I have over 20 routers. Most are dedicated to one job-a number of 690s and 5- 7518s. The router that I grab to do a job where I will put in a bit, and take it out when I'm done is a Milwaukee 5615-20. A 690 used to be my go-to for quick setups, but that Milwaukee is easier to get an accurate depth quickly. It runs and cuts smoothly, and comes with good wrenches for the self-releasing collet.

A plunge router is handy once in a while, but the majority of times the job called for is just edge forming, or running a dado.

The Milwaukee is not a good choice for a table, because the sub-base screws are small, and don't go all the way through the base.

For a table, nothing beats a 7518. Not cheap, but can be had for a little less than 3 bills.
 

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John
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I forgot to mention shank size in my earlier post of things to look for. Knotscott is right on about 1/2" shanks, but, if you get one that takes both 1/2" and 1/4", make sure you get both collets, not a 1/2" collet with a 1/4" adapter. Most of the better routers come with both but there are a few out there that don't.
While I respect Tom's opinion, you will find that most countries don't even offer fixed base routers in their market. Everything that can be done with a fixed base can also be done with a plunge. The plunge base makes it safer and easier to do holes, stopped dados and similar operations. Personally, I like the combo kits as there are a few operations that are easier with a fixed base. :smile:
 

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For the $$$, Grizzly has the Porter Cable 690LR on sale for $100. That's 1/3 off fir a GREAT deal. I bought one just cause I could. I figure I'll use it someday LOL.
 

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For the $$$, Grizzly has the Porter Cable 690LR on sale for $100. That's 1/3 off fir a GREAT deal. I bought one just cause I could. I figure I'll use it someday LOL.
I picked up the PC from Grizzly a couple weeks ago. It's my first router and the price was right. Got a few Rockler bits and I've been practicing and learning on some scraps and small Xmas gift projects. I don't really have a basis for comparison, but I've found it to be easy to learn to use and bit changes and depth adjustments to be straightforward, simple and quick.
 

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I happen to be in the market for a router as well and was curious if this model of craftsman was a decent router.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-12-a...p-00927683000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

They are having a sale right now....

They also have this router bit set on sale... Looks to be a good deal?

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-10-pc-router-bit-set/p-00926002000P?prdNo=3&blockNo=3&blockType=G3

My buddy is going to let me borrow his bosch router and table so I can get the hang of it. I am new to routers and do this as a hobby.

Thanks!
 

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I'm a newbie to routing for edge profiles, and I've been doing a bathroom remodel on our 100 year old house using the Bosch Pony router. I got it on clearance at HD for $69, and just picked up a second at the pawn shop for $14.99. I love this thing because it's not intimidating, line of sight is incredible because of the size and you can get a great edge without getting out a table. I just clamp to my table saw and go.

There's no table made for this thing commercially, but since I picked up a spare I'm going to make one in the vacant area meant for an extension. I highly recommend this router for beginners.

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Alaska guy - I have that router (or one very similar) and it works great. It has both 1/2 and 1/4 collets.

I am wary of the craftsman bits, because they look cheaply constructed to me. But I'm not an expert. I prefer to buy the bits piecemeal for the task at hand, rather than a set where I might not use some.
 

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I happen to be in the market for a router as well and was curious if this model of craftsman was a decent router.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-12-a...p-00927683000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

They are having a sale right now....

They also have this router bit set on sale... Looks to be a good deal?

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-10-pc-router-bit-set/p-00926002000P?prdNo=3&blockNo=3&blockType=G3

My buddy is going to let me borrow his bosch router and table so I can get the hang of it. I am new to routers and do this as a hobby.

Thanks!
The router gets decent grades, but I'd skip those bits.....MLCS has more proven quality and more bits for not much more....$42 shipped. That router should accept 1/2" shank....get 1/2" vs 1/4" whenever possible.
 

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John
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Alaskaguy - What knotscott said. I bought one of those routers last March and it quickly became a go-to. The bits are iffy. MLCS is a good bet. They offer free shipping, at least to the lower 48, best check to see what it will do to you. :smile:
 
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