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Discussion Starter #1
I am cutting up some plywood and found a 2' X 2 1/2' area in the middle of the sheet.

There appears to be no glue in the defective area.

This is brand new 1/2" 8 ply cabinet liner from the cabinet supplier.

Should I panic and scrap every thing or use what is good and hope for the best?

I have cut up 2 other sheets with no issues. Jim
 

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That happened to a sheet of UV2 prefinished China birch. Exact same thing. I took most of the sheet back to the lumber yard (not a big box store) and they gave me credit on my next purchase. I was there that day to buy more material so the credit went toward the purchase.
 

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That's getting more and more common especially with chinese made plywood. Makes a person want to quit using plywood altogether. I built this cabinet for a customer several years ago and after I had it built and was finishing it I noticed the top was delaminating. It took me half the day to cut the plywood out and replace it and it was american made plywood.

There is no real way to know if any of the parts you are using are defective. I would just go with it unless you can see a spot delaminating.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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They just don't glue crap together like they used to....lol.

Seriously though....making plywood should be a pretty simple task....how hard is it to say...wood...glue.....repeat....press..
 

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It happens. Glue is applied via rollers in the lay-up line. Maybe there was a clog or ran out of glue or who knows. Suppliers will always give credit for this sort of thing.
 

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It happens way more often than it should.....it didn't used to happen so often.
 

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ryan50hrl said:
It happens way more often than it should.....it didn't used to happen so often.
True story. About a year and a half ago the federal govt (in its usual infinite wisdom) banned the formaldehyde-based glue lines that have been used by domestic mills for like ever. They replaced the glue that actually worked with a soy-based glue that is absolute garbage. Any moisture trapped in the cross banding will dissolve the glue and cause the plies to delaminate.
 

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There are more glues available than we'd know what to do with......the government didn't dictate what glue to use, just that formaldehyde wasn't allowed...much like you can't use lead pipes for your home plumbing, but can choose pex, PVC, copper, or galvanized.

Plywood mills are being cheap.....period.
 

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ryan50hrl said:
There are more glues available than we'd know what to do with......the government didn't dictate what glue to use, just that formaldehyde wasn't allowed...much like you can't use lead pipes for your home plumbing, but can choose pex, PVC, copper, or galvanized.

Plywood mills are being cheap.....period.
Sorry, my use of pronouns was not clear. I didn't intend to infer that the govt mandated soy based glues to be used, only that they banned the formaldehydes. The plywood mills chose the soy based glues (yes, because they are cheap).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the responses, always appreciated. I did not know it was a common problem!

The only domestic I see here in the swamps of SW FL is 3/4" red oak at Home depot. Domestic may be available, I do not know where? JIm
 

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Thanks for the responses, always appreciated. I did not know it was a common problem!

The only domestic I see here in the swamps of SW FL is 3/4" red oak at Home depot. Domestic may be available, I do not know where? JIm
Keep an eye on that. Most of the Home Depot plywood has gone Chinese, Ecuador , Manila.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Sorry, my use of pronouns was not clear. I didn't intend to infer that the govt mandated soy based glues to be used, only that they banned the formaldehydes. The plywood mills chose the soy based glues (yes, because they are cheap).

Ah......fair enough.......
 

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You get what you pay for.... Expessily in respect to Chinese plywood, no glue in spots... Dont surprise me.... "Inner cores over lapped" always... Makes for good hockey sticks.... 8 years back did a Resturant Reno... Used multi core Chinese plywood..9 ply i believe, birch... I cut down lots of sheets to 4" strips for the post & beam look on walls..... The moment you finish ripping a strip.... It would start to cup.... No big deal for what i planned to use it for.... But wow... I will never ever use such junk again... Not worth it on a project where it really counts
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I suspect that HD got so many returns on Chinese red oak they threw in the towel and only sell made in USA now? Last time I looked everything else was made elsewhere. JIm
 

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I work in a commercial store fixture & millwork shop. We use anywhere from 40-60 sheets of 3/4" poplar core maple veneered hardwood plywood from Columbia Forest Products in any given week. It's hit or miss; quality varies from good to poor between lifts (40 sheets per lift) but we deal with it. My boss is entirely willing to pay more for an American made product.

That said, we also use a line of MDF faced plywood of Chinese origin because our supplier was unable to source it from a domestic manufacturer. It makes me very sad to report that the Chinese plywood - on average - is of a higher quality than the domestic stuff we use. It has fewer voids in the cross banding, never has overlapped veneers in the core (which the domestic stuff from Columbia has, at least 5 sheets per lift on average) and is flat & true of consistent thickness 90% of the time.

My 2 cents: It seems to me that if American manufacturing is ever going to be restored to its former glory, domestic producers are going to have to use a bit more give-a-damn.
 

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BZawat said:
My 2 cents: It seems to me that if American manufacturing is ever going to be restored to its former glory, domestic producers are going to have to use a bit more give-a-damn.
Best quote of the week...
 
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