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Hi, I'm new to this particular forum. I'm curious how many woodworkers use the "burn" method on a standard tape like I have for years? Well last summer I cut a stretcher for a table too short because I forgot to add my burned amount! Mind you I had planed and cut two walnut boards, glued them up to create a 1.5" thick board and planed and jointed it. What a waste. I got in a hurry. I've done it before. I was so mad! I've done it on big timbers too! But that stretcher was the last straw. I'd been looking for the prior two years for a manufacturer to work with me to create a new tape to prevent this common problem and that stretcher re-lit the fire. Well I found a company to work with me and I finally have made them. I did have to commit to buying 500 to pay for part of the tooling cost. So I have to sell them to break even. After that I will direct any additional sales over to the manufacturer. I did this project for the benefit of the timberframe community and because I wanted this tape for myself. I think it may help a lot of other woodworkers too though. Here's a short youtube video I made to show the tape. I'd like to know if general woodworkers use the burn method and thus if this new tape would apply to them? Thanks.
http://youtu.be/DL9pG6axiDM
 

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Hi, I'm new to this particular forum. I'm curious how many woodworkers use the "burn" method on a standard tape like I have for years?

Well last summer I cut a stretcher for a table too short because I forgot to add my burned amount! Mind you I had planed and cut two walnut boards, glued them up to create a 1.5" thick board and planed and jointed it. What a waste. I got in a hurry. I've done it before. I was so mad! I've done it on big timbers too! But that stretcher was the last straw.

I'd been looking for the prior two years for a manufacturer to work with me to create a new tape to prevent this common problem and that stretcher re-lit the fire. Well I found a company to work with me and I finally have made them. I did have to commit to buying 500 to pay for part of the tooling cost. So I have to sell them to break even. After that I will direct any additional sales over to the manufacturer.

I did this project for the benefit of the timber frame community and because I wanted this tape for myself. I think it may help a lot of other woodworkers too though.

Here's a short you tube video I made to show the tape. I'd like to know if general woodworkers use the burn method and thus if this new tape would apply to them? Thanks.
http://youtu.be/DL9pG6axiDM
I do not think you ever described what is this "burn method."

George
 

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Some people start their measurements with a tape from the 1" mark for accuracy (to avoid the hook issue) then have to adjust their actual dimensions to take that 1" into account. I think that's what he means by the "burn" method.

I never use a tape in the shop, unless I'm taking rough measurements of something over 4' long. It's steel rulers or story boards all the way for me. I've never understood why anybody would use a tape for measurements that need to be accurate.
 

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I've burned many a board over the years by "burning an inch" but I don't think that tape measure is the answer.
I try to make sure my tapes are relatively new and in good shape.
I only use the Stanley three rivet style and calibrate it with a steel rule.

I calibrate it by bending the hook to make it read exactly 12" on my steel rule. When I'm working with other people transferring critical, multiple measurements, we always calibrate each other's tapes.

I see guys all the time with tapes they've had since their first job.
They're cheap money. Just buy a new one at least once a year and learn how to use it.

Oh yeah.....I still burn an inch on my tape measure when I need to.
 

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what does this piece of machinery sell for? if you are alone with no one to hold the tape on zero how do you make a long measurement? for short measurements like in the video you could just use a short centering ruler.
 

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where's my table saw?
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there are 10 Million tape measures...why?

Because they work...to varying degrees of accuracy. The issues are either the printed measurements are "off" or the hook on the end doesn't slide accurately. I have one that's 1/4" wide and 4 ft long and others all the way up to 1 1/2" wide by 25 ft long. The "stand out" distance varies with the width and is useful when reaching away from you on a ladder or other situation. So, depending on the application they are useful or not. I have steel scales that I can use if needed.

A story sticks with marks that represent vital dimension are more useful in cabinet layouts than a tape measure in my opinion. If you "burn an inch" as a matter of practice in every situation, and don't ever forget to add back in then that's great. A distraction from a phone call, a loud noise, or a running cat, may cause to you to forget. DAMHIKT :laughing:

I guess I fall into "what ever works best" for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
No, not spam. I'm totally legit. Timberframers really had a need for a tape like this. We layout joinery on long timbers with many using the burn method.
Typically what we do is use a quick grip clamp to hold the tape. Then run it down the timber along the reference edge(arris). I've also developed a tape measure stand to prevent the tape body from falling over or retracting, which is very common problem when laying out by yourself. The stand is not available yet, but will be shortly. It's even better that this tape is a layflat tape too. Makes for much easier marking.

The burn method, as someone else described, and as I described in the video, is when you don't rely on the hook of the tape- it can get bent, the rivets get loose, not accurate from factory etc. Instead you use the 1", 10" or 1ft" mark (whichever your preference) as your zero. So if you have a drawing of something you are laying out, and you are using the 10" mark as your zero, you have to add 10" to your layout/drawing dimensions. The problem comes in when you get in a hurry or get distracted and forget to add the 10" or whatever your burned amount is, and you just mark the drawing dimension. Well that dimension is now laid out too short. If you don't catch it, and start cutting, you've wasted that piece of wood and all the work you've done on it. My tape, having zero actually marked 10 inches form the hook, eliminates the need to remember to add the burned amount. You can layout to the drawing dimensions without fear of mismarking because you forgot to add the burned amount.
 

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I regularly burn an inch at work. I build boats for a living and have to use the burn method, but this is done with two people. It's mostly because there nothing to hook the tape on.
One thing we do when burning an inch is to get vocal about it. The guy holding the dummy end says " On the burn" and the guy on the smarty pants end says "Burning the inch! and calls out the measurment. If there is ever a mistake both should be taken out back and varnished. :yes:

Even if I have to set my tablesaw up to an outside of the blade
measurment I find myself saying things like "7&7/8" to the outside"
What can I say, I am who I am!
 

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DannyT said:
what does this piece of machinery sell for? if you are alone with no one to hold the tape on zero how do you make a long measurement? for short measurements like in the video you could just use a short centering ruler.
When I don't have my mind over matter I like to use my fold up measure.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Take your tape measure and...

Cut off exactly 1 inch including the hook. Now, there is nothing to hook it on.
Put a label near the retracting slot on the tape measure..."Add 1 inch" .... that oughta do it. :yes:

oooops I forgot to mention Do Not Fully Retract the tape inside the housing.... :eek::furious::censored::thumbdown::no:
 

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OK, seriously, is the 1/16" or so that you might be out all that critical in timber framing? I could see it being critical in making jewellery boxes, but the wood is going to shrink or expand more than that in use. Just askin'.
 

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Well for what its worth I have one of the tapes in my hand right now laying out a corner cupboard and I like it, maybe just me just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
@Woodwart - You might be surprised at how precise most of us work in timberframing. We have to lay out joinery on long timbers, 24'-26' is not unusual. I have a couple of reclaimed top plates out in my shed that are 38' long continuous timbers with joinery cut along the way.
We want nice tight joints. If another timberframer sees your work, one of the first things they look at is your joints. If you see gaps bigger than the thickness of a business card, it's a bit of an embarrassment. Tight joints are the hallmark of quality and craftsmanship. I layout using a razor knife because a pencil line is too fat. A razor blade puts the tick just where you want it and there's no mistaking it when you put your chisel into the pre-scored mark. Although we can use a tape or square graduated in 1/16ths, we're actually going split that into 1/32nds and we are going to talk fat 32nds or thin 32nds, which really means we're working in 1/64ths if you can believe it. My first timberframe teacher said, and I believe he was quoting some Olympic skier, "Perfection and Grace will put a smile on your face." That was his approach to timberframing. Don't be a slave to time, but rather pursue perfection and grace. Many of us see timberframing as a way of expressing ourselves, much like an art form.
 

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What I do is simply use a squeeze clamp, ( so not to damage the tape) and set the 0 and roll on, its really nice. Actually a no brainer , again just my ................02
 

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I use a squeeze clamp also but I use the 2" mark on my tape for zero.

I add the 2" to the required length and set that in my head before I even extend the tape.

That way I never forget.
 
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