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Hello, I'm looking for a new jointer and would like some more experienced opinions. So I don't necessarily want to take the "money isn't an issue" route, but I am definitely a buy once cry once kind of guy. I am just starting to buy larger shop equipment and am not brand loyal. For size I definitely want at least 8 inch's but if some of you have larger or wish you did I would love to hear if it's worth it. I buy all of my wood rough sawn from local guys so I would have plenty of opportunity to run wider boards through it if I were to get a larger one. I'm also going to be looking for a planer so any suggestions there would also be greatly appreciated.
 

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Knowing what type of projects you envision would help us understand what type of jointer may be good. Also what species of lumber do you think you will be jointing?


George
 

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Hello, I'm looking for a new jointer and would like some more experienced opinions. So I don't necessarily want to take the "money isn't an issue" route, but I am definitely a buy once cry once kind of guy. I am just starting to buy larger shop equipment and am not brand loyal. For size I definitely want at least 8 inch's but if some of you have larger or wish you did I would love to hear if it's worth it. I buy all of my wood rough sawn from local guys so I would have plenty of opportunity to run wider boards through it if I were to get a larger one. I'm also going to be looking for a planer so any suggestions there would also be greatly appreciated.
Pretty much, a jointer is a jointer. Get as big a jointer as you can, not only in width but the length of the table too. The longer table you have makes it easier to edge joint long lengths.
 

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CharleyL
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It will depend a lot on what kind of woodworking you do. If you start with rough sawn material a lot, you need a wide and long jointer. If you almost never work rough sawn materials, you can get away with a smaller jointer, since you won't be flattening very wide stock or at least not often enough to justify the cost. The bed length becomes important if you will be jointing boards more than about 2X the length of the jointer bed. I almost never work with rough sawn lumber, or at least never need to straighten the wide side of the boards, so my 6" wide jointer is more than adequate for most of my work. The tables total length (from memory) are about 40". It's an import no name copy of an older Delta.
It does what I need, but if a clean, used 8" Powermatic should come along at the right price, it will quickly replace what I have. I wouldn't want to own anything smaller that what I have. You should also make certain that anything you find has adjustable out feed as well as infeed tables and that they are flat and easily adjustable. The blades and outfeed table height need to be exactly the same height for straight jointing. Grind the blades on one that is not adjustable and there is no compensation ability to make it work right.

Charley
 

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Pretty much, a jointer is a jointer. Get as big a jointer as you can, not only in width but the length of the table too. The longer table you have makes it easier to edge joint long lengths.
I agree with Steve. Jointers are jointers...just go as big as your budget can afford and as big as your shop will allow. When you go bigger than 8" these units get large and quite heavy. I have an old 6" jointer that I will be replacing next year. The 12" models that I'm looking at are around 1,300 pounds and 84" in length.

If you can afford it I would go with a spiral or helical cutter head. Apart from being quieter and producing a nicer finish (in my opinion) it's nice to have the safety net of only having to turn or replace a small inexpensive insert if you happen to run into an unexpected nail or other object. I have my own sawmill and primarily mill urban logs. I've had a few nails get past my sawmill only to be discovered on the jointer or planer. I've also been using a lot of nail infested reclaimed barn wood this year. Prior to upgrading to a spiral cutter head on my jointer I hit the leading edge of a nail and instantly ruined all three blades. After that hit I put a spiral cutter head on my jointer and I've hit about a half dozen nails on both the jointer and planer since then. Those nail hits haven't done any damage at all to the new Grizzly cutter heads. I haven't even had to turn a single insert!

If you're going to purchase a new machine I'd recommend that you consider Grizzly. To me it seems that Grizzly, Powermatic, Jet & ShopFox are pretty much the same equipment apart from some very minor changes. I've heard that all of them are made in the same factories overseas. Although I don't know if that's true I can say that parts from these manufacturers are interchangeable. While refurbishing an old Grizzly planer and an old jointer earlier this year I was able to order Jet & Powermatic parts for my Grizzly equipment when the Grizzly part I needed was backordered or delayed. To give you an idea of the price difference a Powermatic 15HH Planer is around $3,200 delivered to your door compared to $2,250 to get the Grizzly G1021X2 delivered. That Grizzly pricing is their standard price. 3 or 4 times a year they run sales that typically knocks off 10% and/or discounts shipping. I currently have 5 Grizzly machines in my shop and I am happy with all of them.

If I were to buy a new jointer right now I'd go with the Grizzly G0834.
 

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You need to decide how much space you have for a jointer and planer first, how big of lumber you intend to work with and then how much money you are willing to spend.

I just bought a Shop Fox 8" with insert head, have not unpacked it yet. I want a 16"x96" or bigger jointer and a 24' planer. DO NOT have anywhere near the room. I then strongly considered a Felder/hammer/MiniMax 410(16") combination jointer planer. Just could not fit the width in the space I have, a 12" combo would fit but not interested as I already have a 12" planer. Decided on the Shop Fox 8" for the longer table, will be tight on width but will work. Spent over a year trying to decide what I needed, what would fit versus what would move out to make more space available. Would have bought over 8 months sooner BUT could not get decent customer service at local work working stores so bought online.

Look at what is available, how much room you have and how much money you are willing to spend. $1800-$10,000+.
Come back with more questions, comments and let us know when you finally decide
Good luck
Ron
 

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I picked up a fine old 6" Dewalt joiner with a 48" bed a month or so ago. It was only missing the motor, but grabbed it for $75 and it included a real nice shop built metal stand. Check CL (craigslist) often and one will probably pop up eventually.
 

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I've got a rebuilt 3hp motor out of a powermatic tablesaw. I've looked for tablesaw needing a motor for years just to use it and get rid of it. 15 years later it's still sitting on the shelf.....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Knowing what type of projects you envision would help us understand what type of jointer may be good. Also what species of lumber do you think you will be jointing?


George
I do a lot of furniture for myself and friends and once I get a shop outfitted plan on trying to sell some pieces. I work with a lot of walnut, oak, and maple.
 

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I agree with Steve. Jointers are jointers...just go as big as your budget can afford and as big as your shop will allow. When you go bigger than 8" these units get large and quite heavy. I have an old 6" jointer that I will be replacing next year. The 12" models that I'm looking at are around 1,300 pounds and 84" in length.

If you can afford it I would go with a spiral or helical cutter head. Apart from being quieter and producing a nicer finish (in my opinion) it's nice to have the safety net of only having to turn or replace a small inexpensive insert if you happen to run into an unexpected nail or other object. I have my own sawmill and primarily mill urban logs. I've had a few nails get past my sawmill only to be discovered on the jointer or planer. I've also been using a lot of nail infested reclaimed barn wood this year. Prior to upgrading to a spiral cutter head on my jointer I hit the leading edge of a nail and instantly ruined all three blades. After that hit I put a spiral cutter head on my jointer and I've hit about a half dozen nails on both the jointer and planer since then. Those nail hits haven't done any damage at all to the new Grizzly cutter heads. I haven't even had to turn a single insert!

If you're going to purchase a new machine I'd recommend that you consider Grizzly. To me it seems that Grizzly, Powermatic, Jet & ShopFox are pretty much the same equipment apart from some very minor changes. I've heard that all of them are made in the same factories overseas. Although I don't know if that's true I can say that parts from these manufacturers are interchangeable. While refurbishing an old Grizzly planer and an old jointer earlier this year I was able to order Jet & Powermatic parts for my Grizzly equipment when the Grizzly part I needed was backordered or delayed. To give you an idea of the price difference a Powermatic 15HH Planer is around $3,200 delivered to your door compared to $2,250 to get the Grizzly G1021X2 delivered. That Grizzly pricing is their standard price. 3 or 4 times a year they run sales that typically knocks off 10% and/or discounts shipping. I currently have 5 Grizzly machines in my shop and I am happy with all of them.

If I were to buy a new jointer right now I'd go with the Grizzly G0834.
Thank you for the advice this is the exact type of information I was looking for. So if I were to buy that Grizzly jointer it wouldn't leave much budget for a planer. In that case I could buy a cheap lunchbox planer meaning I have to upgrade later on, or I could just use the router sled method to get the second side flat. Any opinions of if the lunchbox is worth it to avoid the tedious router work or if I should just skip it and be able to buy a floor model sooner?
 

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Thank you for the advice this is the exact type of information I was looking for. So if I were to buy that Grizzly jointer it wouldn't leave much budget for a planer. In that case I could buy a cheap lunchbox planer meaning I have to upgrade later on, or I could just use the router sled method to get the second side flat. Any opinions of if the lunchbox is worth it to avoid the tedious router work or if I should just skip it and be able to buy a floor model sooner?
Keep in mind that there is a drastic difference in price between a 12" jointer and 8" jointer. You'd typically cut the cost of the 12" jointer in half if you went with a nice 8" model. You could get a very nice 8" jointer and 15" planer, both with spiral cutter heads, for about $2,000 each. Another option is a combination machine like the Grizzly G0634Z that is both a 12" jointer and 12" planer for about $3,000. I can't speak from any real world experience to the advantages or disadvantages of combo machine. My initial thoughts are that the 12" jointing capability would be very nice although the wings are a little shorter than what you'd get with a stand-alone model. I don't think the conversion from jointer to planer (and back) would be to much work. I do suspect that only having a 12" planer could be problematic.

As far as a "lunchbox" planer goes I also don't have experience with that. I do see a lot of people using models like the Dewalt DW735 or equivalent Makita models.
By the time you purchase one of those and outfit it with a helical head you'll probably have $800 or $900 into it.

If I had to purchase both a jointer and planer with a $5,000 budget I'd probably spend around $2,000 for a nice 8" jointer and then spend around $3,000 for a nice 20" planer. For those times that I have to joint boards larger than 8" I'd deal with sled for my planer to joint boards. If the majority of the boards you joint are larger than 8" then you should hold out for a 12" jointer.

The reason I'll eventually spend the money to get into a nice 12" jointer is that the urban lumber I end up milling myself often leaves me with boards in that 8" to 12" wide range. I'm always surprised that by the time I get a log squared up to the point where I'm ready to take dimensional lumber off of it that the boards almost always end up being around 8" to 12" wide. The biggest log I ever cut on my mill was just over 30" wide and by the time I squared it up I had a 14" x 18" beam remaining. That log was very non-typical for me. I can count the number of 30" + logs I've milled on one hand. The "normal" trees that I cut in the 20" range where I'll typically end up getting 8" to 10" wide dimensional lumber out of them.

It could have something to do with how I mill logs but I think this might be typical of hobby milled urban lumber. I spent a few days this weekend moving, sorting and stacking few thousand board feet of cherry lumber that someone else had milled. Although I did have a few 6" wide boards the vast majority of the boards ranged between 8" and 10" wide.
 

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I bought an 8" Grizzly G0858 jointer about 18 months ago and love it. I don't often need to work with wider lumber. It pairs with a Dewalt DW735 lunchbox planer. The combination works quite well for my needs. I bought it in part due to its longer table, which is quite helpful. The helical cutter head also reduces noise quite a bit. It weighs about 470 pounds but comes almost fully assembled in a wood crate. I was able to get it out of the crate onto my shop floor by myself. It has a built-in mobile base, but I almost never move it.
 

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I'll see if I can contact Troy in KC. If there's an old or new jointer in KC available he will know. He use to be one of the owners of Overland tool. I worked with him and his son for years out at Jakobe furniture on 55th street
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'll see if I can contact Troy in KC. If there's an old or new jointer in KC available he will know. He use to be one of the owners of Overland tool. I worked with him and his son for years out at Jakobe furniture on 55th street
That would be awesome!
 

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Buy the largest jointer you can afford. Buy one that has a spiral segmented cutter head with carbide inserts and one that has a good dust/chip port.
 

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Whatever you purchase, check the tables thoroughly. A jointer has one purpose only, to make a surface balls on flat, or a perfect S2S edge. If it does not do that, you purchased a very expensive paperweight. I did work from time to time for a commercial custom shop. I will not mention the brand, but they had a $5k 12" longbed jointer. The infeed and outfeed table were tweaked and nobody could seem to fix it. The manufacturer said it was within acceptable standards. It resulted in a lot of frustration and wasted wood. In my shop I have an old Delta/Invicta 6" long bed. I wish it were an 8", but will not sell it because the tables are absolutely perfect. It was made in the late 60's I believe. The only downside is I sometimes have to do a few more glue ups. Learned to accept it. Whatever you purchase make sure the tables are adjustable, and in line with each other. For me, I like the older stuff, Delta, Powermatic, General Machine.
 
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