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I recently bought a Craftsman model 21829 portable table saw and I really like it. Now I am looking for a dado insert and a zero-clearance insert. I can't seem to find one, even a Sears. Does anyone have anything on this?
 

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Sorry can't answer your question, but WELCOME to a fellow sandlapper!!!!
 

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I recently bought a Craftsman model 21829 portable table saw and I really like it. Now I am looking for a dado insert and a zero-clearance insert. I can't seem to find one, even a Sears. Does anyone have anything on this?
most portable tabel saws dont have the horsepower to run a dado blade thats from my experience though i could be wrong about the model you have
 

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Have you ever though about making your own inserts outta hard wood. For dado cuts I still use the factory insert that came with my saw but I make all my zero clearance inserts now. The last couple were out of white oak. They look nice too. Recently made one for my miter saw too.
 

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Dado and Zero Clearance

I make mine out of 1/2" MDF and put a piece of formica on it.
It fits my Delta perfect that way.

Just trace out your existing insert and cut a new one.
I used the table saw to cut the piece to width.

When I didnt have a bandsaw, I used my hand held scroll saw to cut the round ends and finished them with a hand held angle grinder. It fit really well.
Just lower the blade all of the way, put in insert, move fence over insert to help hold it down making sure that the blade wont come up through the fence. Then turn on saw and use a scrap to put some downward force on the insert and slowly crank the blade up through the insert.

To make additional inserts, I cut a bunch of pieces of 1/2" MDF to width.
I then screwed my first homemade insert to my work bench.
Then screwed a blank on top of my first insert and used a router with a flush trimmer bit to duplicate the first one.
I made several of them.
One for each stacked dado size and one for the zero clearance and a few extra's laying around. They will come in handy If I butcher up one of the good ones.

I always use the zero clearance insert on my table saw. It eliminates jams, reduces kickbacks and allows me to cut fine slices of veneer off the side of solid stock. This veneer would otherwise be sucked down under the table. Oh, and BTW, you might need to cut some veneer to glue under the insert to get the right height.
I never use the original factory insert...NEVER.

Tony B
 

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where's my table saw?
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Well Done Tony B, great reply! and photos as well. I make zero clearance inserts that fit inside the stock throat plate gap on my Craftsman saw. They are about 1/2" wide, 1/8th thick and fit in the rounded gap. I tape them in from the back side and raise the blade as you suggest with pressure down from the top. I rip a bunch of them to width, 1/2", round the corners on the disc sander and I'm good for lots of cuts. I don't have to accomodate the leveling screws since I'm using the stock plate to start with. They are pretty much disposable without much of a loss in time or material. A little off the question here but a good tip is still a good tip! A router insert needs to be rigid, so the thicker the better. Aluminum, plexiglass/Lexan, any stiff hardwood are all good. And leveling screws are a must, since a hangup will cause a burn mark or a bump....not good. Tony B's technique for making a the inserts would still apply however. Make several with different dia holes for different size cutters if changing out the router isn't too time consuming. I have a MastRlift and love it. All height adjustments are from the top with a crank. What a time saver.Bill
 
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