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Discussion Starter #1
I started a dresser last week to compliment the 4 poster bed I made for my daughter. One of the standout design features I used in the bed are octagonal tapered posts that reach about 7'6" high. I wanted to continue with that general design element, so the legs of the dresser are, more or less, octagonal tapers. Well, at least some of the edges are. I chose a frame and panel construction so the legs can reach down to the floor. The legs are made out of 12/4 maple and start at 1.25 inches at the top and finish at 2.75" at the floor.

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I used a floating tenon to attach the rails to the stiles of the panels. This was my first mortise joint and I used the Beadlock jig. It worked very nicely, although I had to hammer the tenons into place. I think they may have expanded in the lovely PNW moisture.

Based on advice from experts on this forum, I opted for a web frame construction to keep things square and to provide the drawers a place to slide on. The top web frame has elongated slots cut in it for attaching the top.

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I routed a 3/4" deep rabbet into the back of each side piece to accept the 3/4" panel. Before I glued the panel in, I cut my dados for the web frames into the panels.

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With the stopped dados in the sides, I needed to relieve the front and back of the web frame so they could sit in the dados and be flush with the legs. I did this on the jointer. I set the jointer cut depth to be just shy of the dado depth. This ensures I get a good flush fit at the front of the dresser where the web frames will be visible.


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You may not be able to tell, but on the legs, the visible edge has a 45 degree chamfer that tapers from the top to the bottom to match the bed posts. I used a slick way to cut this chamfered taper on the jointer. I tilted my jointer fence to 45 degrees and set the depth of cut for 3/8". I ran the leg along the jointer until I cut a chamfer halfway along the leg, and lifted the leg off the jointer. I cut it again, but now because the front of the leg had already been cut, and the middle section hadn't been cut, it established the taper angle I was going for. The cut came out perfectly.

I left off tonight with the panels glued into the sides. I'm hoping later this week to glue the web frames in place and complete the carcass so I can begin on the drawers
 

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Looks like you are off to a good start. I will be watching as I have a dresser on my “short” project list.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks CPS. I'll keep the thread going. If I remember correctly, you were one of the people who followed my bed build. This dresser will hopefully match that bed in design and style.
 

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Lots of people follow things but don't comment.... just saying...

I'm usually not impressed with pocket screws, but I do like your answer for getting things to fit at the joiner.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks johnnie52. That means a lot. I figured the pocket screws were perfect for something like a web frame that won't ever be seen. I just had to make sure the pocket screws were toward the inboard side of the frames or I would have really had problems at the jointer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got the panels glued in the side frames and then glued in the web frames. It is starting to look like something now. I don't have enough floor space in my shop to even stand the dresser up, so I had to glue it up on top of my TS. Man I can't wait for a larger shop.



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Tomorrow I'll be starting the drawer construction.
 

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I've enjoyed following your progress. You have to love a small shop that challenges your creativity. I've made several large bookcases and side boards that I had to do the same thing during the assembly process. My dream is a bigger shop!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
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Sizing the drawer fronts. I was a little concerned about the different color of the wood, but it will be treated with a dark brown dye stain, so I think it will be ok. The lower two drawer fronts came from the same board that was 13" wide and 10' long. I got a hundred bf of maple from a local sawyer and that board was part of the bundle.

After this pic, I routed the edges of the fronts to give a little interest to the front of the dresser. More to come.
 

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Nice work.

I know that feeling of not having enough room to turn around in the shop. Right now my table saw doubles as my wood storage. Try using the saw when you have project lumber stacked and stickered sitting on top of the saw.

I really think all of us wish we had bigger shops including the lucky ones who already have a couple of thousand square feet. :laughing:
 

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Very nice job so far... I really liked the stop dado trick you did with the jointer. My only fear with that was the pocket screws being to close to the jointer.... that would have been ugly if they hit. :eek:

I'm eager to see how it all works out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I finally did the final construction and sanding this week. I made my first molding, a very simple cove detail to add under the top to give it a beefier look.

Of course, as I was gluing that molding in place, I went to tack it in with some 23ga pin nails, and my very first nail shot right up through the top of the dresser. I broke the nail off and added a little putty and nobody will ever know...

I had some help blowing the dust off before wiping down with a tack cloth.


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However, I did a lot more reading about spraying my dye stain and I thought I had it figured out. Boy was I wrong. I'm hoping some of you experienced finishers can tell me what I did wrong here.


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This is after a first spraying of water based dye stain from General Finishes. My HVLP was set about 30psi at the gun with the fluid knob almost all the way open. It looks like some of the wood really sucked up the dye while other parts didn't want any of it. Here is a close up of a drawer front to show how uneven the spray went on.



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It almost looks like there is particulate matter in the stain, but those are really just droplets of stain.

I was hoping to just spray the stain on and be done with it. However, with this kind of application, I had to wipe off the excess stain, which made it much more uniform.



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This is after wiping off the first application of stain.

I wanted to go a little darker, so I shot a second coat. This time I dialed the pressure back to about 20psi and turned the fluid knob way down. It still looks very bumpy for a sprayed stain.


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After I wiped off the 2nd application, the color is close enough so I stopped for the night.

The dye looks horrible by itself, but I know from the bed I built earlier, that lacquer over the dye will look great.

Any ideas on what I did wrong here? My goal in spraying was to get a nice even coat without having to wipe afterwards.



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Maker of sawdust
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finish

There are sealers that cam be put down before putting down the actual finish normally a water downed version of what finish you are going to apply later on. this gives the dye that you are going to put on a equal base for a more even dye ore finish if adding more than one color apply between coats. took me a few trys to come close to what I wanted. best to try on scrap first.

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I finally finished the dresser for my daughter. It only took me a month of weekends and a few evenings - a pretty quick project by my standards.

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I saw a drawer construction method in fine woodworking that used pinned rabbets. I used it here and I really like the results. The fronts are rabbeted to accept the drawer sides and then I used a 1/4" walnut dowel to pin the joint. That should be plenty strong, plus it gives a neat look.

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I managed to add a secret compartment for my 13 yr olds treasures that her sisters won't be able to find. If she pulls the drawer out to the stop and then releases the catch, she can pull the drawer out further and there's a secret compartment at the back of the drawer.

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I'm really happy with how it turned out and she is ecstatic about finally having a dresser. Of course, it remains to be seen if her clothes will stay off the floor now.
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Oh man my heart just sank when I saw your results with the spray,
but wow! what a comeback :thumbsup: That looks great! You really out did yourself with this one.
Love the secret compartment, and I bet your daughter just loves it!
You should be proud of a job well done.
 

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I'm just glad someone else has to use their table saw as an assembly table.....on the upside.....I know its flat....
 
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