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Wondering what everyones thoughts are on the Unisaw? I know Delta is owned by a Taiwanese company, but I havent see too many complaints. This saw seems really good to me.. larger infeed space, Biesemeyer Fence, both handles on front, improved DC in the cabinet, multi angle shutoff switch, larger throat, and the arbor nut/washer is one piece! ha.

anyway, Im looking to upgrade from a Ridgid finally, and this seems to be a pretty damn good saw... sawstop is not an option.
 

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Wondering what everyones thoughts are on the Unisaw? I know Delta is owned by a Taiwanese company, but I havent see too many complaints. This saw seems really good to me.. larger infeed space, Biesemeyer Fence, both handles on front, improved DC in the cabinet, multi angle shutoff switch, larger throat, and the arbor nut/washer is one piece! ha.

anyway, Im looking to upgrade from a Ridgid finally, and this seems to be a pretty damn good saw... sawstop is not an option.
I've used Unisaws for 48 years and found them to be great saws however I bought a new one 21 years ago and found it wasn't near the quality they used to be. Hate to think how bad they have gotten since. The cover plate around the blade isn't flat, it dips in the middle. The cast extensions aren't milled completely flat so you can't make the top flush. Then the wooden extension to the right they don't make any way to fasten it to the saw top so it sags from front to back.
 

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where's my table saw?
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If you can examine one in person that's the only way to come to a good conclusion. About 15 years ago, I bought a new 5 HP 12" Powermatic after seeing it on the floor of a high end woodworking store here in Michigan. I was so impressed, I paid cash that day. They delivered it and set it up for me in my shop. It is smooth as silk to operate and scary powerful. I still have it, but it's in storage at the present time. The name Unisaw has evolved like most every brand, from Chevy to Cadillac. What used to be good, or bad, is no longer the same. so it's up to each prospective buyer to check it out in person.
 

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Termite
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I bought mine in 2001. Its was an older model and works perfect

I think it only matters if your happy with the purchase
 

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Ancient Termite
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Bought mine around 2000 or 2001. It is a 3 HP model and RIGHT TILT.

I was in a woodworking class at a community college and used both UniSaw and Powermatic. The were all 20 to 30 years old at the time and 5 hp. The Powermatic seemed to be clunky. Nothing wrong with the Powermatic but it just seemed to be clunky. That caused me to lean toward the Unisaw. That was about 20 years ago.

As for the right tilt vs. left tilt. There is a large amount of hysteria about right tilt trapping the work between the blade and the fence. Yes, it is possible, just as it is possible when driving a vehicle to run into a bridge abutment. In 20 or so years I can only remember only one project making bevel cuts. Make your bevel cuts with a push stick and proper pressure with a good table saw technique and you'll be fine. However if you want total accuracy when using the fence ruler, regardless of the blade or dado, you want a right tilt.

BTW - In 30 years of the woodworking program at the college, they never had an amputation. Because proper table saw techniques were taught. Because of college politics, the saws have been replaced with SawStop. I bumped into the woodworking department head at a recent AWFS. During our conversation I asked if they had any blade drops. His response was, "Dozens. I can't remember how many." That says a lot for proper table saw techniques.
 

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For the same money you can buy a SawStop 1.75 cabinet saw.

Virtually all table saw, jointers and planers are made in Taiwan.

Delta is an American company.

Personally, Delta is the only major brand I’m a bit leary about. I’ve seen the homeowner type contractor saw at Home Depot once, not the quality I expected.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Bought mine around 2000 or 2001. It is a 3 HP model and RIGHT TILT.

I was in a woodworking class at a community college and used both UniSaw and Powermatic. The were all 20 to 30 years old at the time and 5 hp. The Powermatic seemed to be clunky. Nothing wrong with the Powermatic but it just seemed to be clunky. That caused me to lean toward the Unisaw. That was about 20 years ago.

As for the right tilt vs. left tilt. There is a large amount of hysteria about right tilt trapping the work between the blade and the fence. Yes, it is possible, just as it is possible when driving a vehicle to run into a bridge abutment. In 20 or so years I can only remember only one project making bevel cuts. Make your bevel cuts with a push stick and proper pressure with a good table saw technique and you'll be fine. However if you want total accuracy when using the fence ruler, regardless of the blade or dado, you want a right tilt.

BTW - In 30 years of the woodworking program at the college, they never had an amputation. Because proper table saw techniques were taught. Because of college politics, the saws have been replaced with SawStop. I bumped into the woodworking department head at a recent AWFS. During our conversation I asked if they had any blade drops. His response was, "Dozens. I can't remember how many." That says a lot for proper table saw techniques.
Ok, Rich I take issue with those bold face items:

On a right tilt saw and the fence on the right and the blade tilted into the fence, YES the work can get trapped.
The same issue applies to a left tilt saw with the blade on the left and tilted into the fence! Yes, the work can get trapped.
All it takes is for the far end of the work to raise up the slightest amount and there's no room for it to go.
Now, the upward spinning teeth grab a hold of it and shoot it out towards the operator!
Proper instruction will prevent BOTH of those conditions. DON'T DO THAT!

Probably in the one project you made using bevels, you did not do that!

My fence tape is exactly accurate, left tilt saw, with no blade thickness changes and no bevel cuts (which then would require recalibration.)
It's better to measure for those OR make a test piece.

The instructor said there were dozens of blade drops/saw brake applications.
You said "blade drops" would be prevented with proper techniques, YES to some extent, but what happened to "proper instruction"?
Seems like after getting Saw Stops, proper instructions were not emphasized?
Don't worry, nothing can go wrong, kinda thinking.
Well, he's dead wrong on that, kick backs are NOT prevented with a flesh sensing safety device because there is no contact made to the blade to trigger the device during a kickback.

I was a Material and Processes Instructor back at the University years ago and was in charge of a very large well equipped shop where we had all sorts of power equipment, table saw, jointer, thickness planer, metal and wood lathes, etc. There were around 20 students in the class, and some females who had never set foot in a shop. I think it was a sophomore level class, maybe juniors? I remember one young lady who got her finger nail trimmed getting it too close to the disc sander. That was all the "carnage" there was. It was a terrorizing and full time job keeping those kids safe. BYW, I was about 23 years old at the time, not that much older than my students, but the faculty had faith in me.


:unsure:
 

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Termite
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I took woodshop for 3 years and didn't learn a thing. It's actually doing it in the field that educates you.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I took woodshop for 3 years and didn't learn a thing. It's actually doing it in the field that educates you.
That's because you all ready knew everything they were trying to teach, unlike the rest of the kids.
 

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Many SawStop Triggers at the College:

I don't know much about how that college uses SawStop saws, but I would be alarmed if the number is as high as @NoThankyou says. I agree with @woodnthings that something isn't right. If I ran that department, I would try to understand why there are so many triggers and what can be done to reduce them. I wonder who pays for the replacement brakes and whether they replace the blade after a trigger.

Right Tilt with Fence on the Right:

The right tilt bevel cut with the fence on the right scares me because in addition to injury or shop damage concerns, I imagine what can happen to my saw if there is a kickback. With the blade angled over the workpiece, a kickback that occurs from lifting up in the back of the blade would trap the workpiece. The kickback could be caused by poor alignment of blade relative to the fence, wood movement or expansion during the cut, poor cutting technique where the workpiece rotates slightly during the cut, a non-flat or non-straight workpiece, etc.

What scares me is that the wood has no place to go as that kickback starts, so it gets crushed between the blade and fence. That crushing force may damage the fence, bend or break the blade, damage the arbor and bearings, etc. After it damages or destroys your saw, then the wood is free to be flung at high speed to injure you or create havoc in the shop.

On the extraordinarily rare times when I make a bevel cut like that on the table saw, I put the fence on the left. It feels "off" but I am very careful with those cuts.
 

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Because of college politics, the saws have been replaced with SawStop. I bumped into the woodworking department head at a recent AWFS. During our conversation I asked if they had any blade drops. His response was, "Dozens. I can't remember how many." That says a lot for proper table saw techniques.
Yeah, having a SS doesn't mean you should be less careful about not touching the blade. But I wonder if some of those school drops were from things like a metal miter gauge fence touching the blade. Not all drops are flesh-blade contact. Wouldn't surprise me if some students think the hot dog demo is fun.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Many SawStop Triggers at the College:

I don't know much about how that college uses SawStop saws, but I would be alarmed if the number is as high as @NoThankyou says. I agree with @woodnthings that something isn't right. If I ran that department, I would try to understand why there are so many triggers and what can be done to reduce them. I wonder who pays for the replacement brakes and whether they replace the blade after a trigger.

Right Tilt with Fence on the Right:

The right tilt bevel cut with the fence on the right scares me because in addition to injury or shop damage concerns, I imagine what can happen to my saw if there is a kickback. With the blade angled over the workpiece, a kickback that occurs from lifting up in the back of the blade would trap the workpiece. The kickback could be caused by poor alignment of blade relative to the fence, wood movement or expansion during the cut, poor cutting technique where the workpiece rotates slightly during the cut, a non-flat or non-straight workpiece, etc.

What scares me is that the wood has no place to go as that kickback starts, so it gets crushed between the blade and fence. That crushing force may damage the fence, bend or break the blade, damage the arbor and bearings, etc. After it damages or destroys your saw, then the wood is free to be flung at high speed to injure you or create havoc in the shop.

On the extraordinarily rare times when I make a bevel cut like that on the table saw, I put the fence on the left. It feels "off" but I am very careful with those cuts.
I lack first hand experience of this condition, BUT I have experienced ordinary vertical blade kickbacks where the work moved away from contacting the fence on it's entire length and it shoots out towards the operator OR rotates up and over the spinning blade which is the most common kickback. In those cases there is no "pinching" effect or "trapping" of the work.
In the case where the work is trapped, it's my opinion that it would shoot out just like an ordinary kickback. I think it will take the "path of least resistance" and exit out before it would push against the fence or blade, BUT I could be wrong.
 

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I lack first hand experience of this condition, BUT I have experienced ordinary vertical blade kickbacks where the work moved away from contacting the fence on it's entire length and it shoots out towards the operator OR rotates up and over the spinning blade which is the most common kickback. In those cases there is no "pinching" effect or "trapping" of the work.
In the case where the work is trapped, it's my opinion that it would shoot out just like an ordinary kickback. I think it will take the "path of least resistance" and exit out before it would push against the fence or blade, BUT I could be wrong.
Kickbacks are bad, but I am not concerned about table saw damage if the blade is in its usual vertical position.

Reminder:
The bevel cut example we're discussing is where the workpiece is between the blade and the fence and the blade is angled over the top of the workpiece, such as a right tilt saw with the fence on the right.

When the kickback starts, the blade begins to grab the workpiece and tries to move it. In that first instant, the blade forces are almost all perpendicular to the table - up in the back, down in the front. Also in that first instant, the workpiece has nowhere to go. There is very little gap between the workpiece and the fence or blade. The workpiece starts to rise up, and then I am not sure what happens next. I imagine that there are three options:
  • The wood is compressed between the angled blade and the fence.
    • This was my concern: That the compression might damage the fence, the blade, or the arbor on the saw.
  • The right side of the workpiece rises and angles just enough to slip up the side of the fence.
    • An instant later, it is free to be flung out in a kickback.
  • The blade relieves enough of the pressure by cutting away (really: chew up) some of the workpiece at that moment, allowing the workpiece to rise up enough to get flung out.
  • ... or some combination of the three.
Once the workpiece rises up a little, then horizontal forces begin to come into play, which quickly overwhelm everything else and the kickback happens.

True or not, correct or not, factual or not - I will continue to move the fence to the left side of the blade for those very rare bevel cuts.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I lack first hand experience of this condition, BUT I have experienced ordinary vertical blade kickbacks where the work moved away from contacting the fence on it's entire length and it shoots out towards the operator OR rotates up and over the spinning blade which is the most common kickback. In those cases there is no "pinching" effect or "trapping" of the work.
In the case where the work is trapped, it's my opinion that it would shoot out just like an ordinary kickback. I think it will take the "path of least resistance" and exit out before it would push against the fence or blade, BUT I could be wrong.
Kickbacks are bad, but I am not concerned about table saw damage if the blade is in its usual vertical position.

Reminder:
The bevel cut example we're discussing is where the workpiece is between the blade and the fence and the blade is angled over the top of the workpiece, such as a right tilt saw with the fence on the right.

When the kickback starts, the blade begins to grab the workpiece and tries to move it. In that first instant, the blade forces are almost all perpendicular to the table - up in the back, down in the front. Also in that first instant, the workpiece has nowhere to go. There is very little gap between the workpiece and the fence or blade. The workpiece starts to rise up, and then I am not sure what happens next. I imagine that there are three options:
  • The wood is compressed between the angled blade and the fence.
    • This was my concern: That the compression might damage the fence, the blade, or the arbor on the saw.
  • The right side of the workpiece rises and angles just enough to slip up the side of the fence.
    • An instant later, it is free to be flung out in a kickback.
  • The blade relieves enough of the pressure by cutting away (really: chew up) some of the workpiece at that moment, allowing the workpiece to rise up enough to get flung out.
  • ... or some combination of the three.
Once the workpiece rises up a little, then horizontal forces begin to come into play, which quickly overwhelm everything else and the kickback happens.

True or not, correct or not, factual or not - I will continue to move the fence to the left side of the blade for those very rare bevel cuts.
You either did not understand my previous post OR didn't see that part about the workpiece being trapped.
Trapped by a right tilted blade towards the fence on the right side of the blade, or visa versa.


Neither one of us knows for sure what will happen, but I stand by my "theory" that it will shoot out toward the operator with no harm to the saw, the blade or the fence.
A kickback is by definition the propulsion of the workpiece back toward the operator.
Our member Rich Christopherson, says "nothing will happen" it will just sit there and go no where and he's done it.
My statement was, if the workpiece lifts even the slightest amount it will then kickback from the teeth engaging the blade.
 

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I wrote several responses, but let them die. I did understand your previous post, and I did see the part about the workpiece being trapped.

After thinking about it for several days, I believe that the fundamental difference between our points of view are our concepts of the blade forces at that first instant when the workpiece lifts up.

I concede that @woodnthings may be correct, but I'm still not 100% sure about it. (I reserve the right to say in the future, "the jury will disregard this post." :)

MY VIEW:
In my view, the direction of force from the back of the blade to the workpiece is mostly vertical at the start of the kickback. There is isn't a lot of horizontal force (yet) to eject the workpiece underneath the angled blade. As the workpiece lifts, it has to "get outa' there" but the workpiece must lift up more to reach the point where the curved blade is introducing sufficient horizontal force to eject the workpiece in a kickback.

With a bevel cut, the blade is raised more than a typical 90 degree rip cut. Whether that's enough to reduce the horizontal force such that there is a compression/pinching issue above the workpiece (at the start of the kickback) is an open question for me.

WOODNTHINGS' VIEW (FROM MY PERSPECTIVE):
I think that woodnthings is thinking about a lower blade, where the forces at the rear of the blade are much more towards the front of the saw, and much less upward than my point of view. Imagine a blade so low that the teeth are barely above the workpiece. Most of those forces want to push the workpiece towards the front of the saw, perhaps enough to eject the board out from under the trapping effect of the angled blade.

-> Woodnthings: Does that match your perspective? Does it help? Am I on track, or still missing something?
 

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Ancient Termite
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If you believe that a push stick/pad/thingy is intended to come in contact with the blade, then right tilt/left tilt makes no never mind.

I the push thingy allows downward pressure while feeding the direction of tilt is irrelevant. In the book "In the Craftsman Style" by Taunton Press and page 60 or so is an example of the "perfect" push thingy. Come on, I haven't looked at the book in over 15 years so the page number is close but no cigar. The beauty of the design is that the parts that are intended to come in contact with the blade are easily replaceable using common home center materials.

If you habitually use that push thingy, you should never have an accident. But in the computer industry they say, If something is designed to be idiot proof, God will make smarter idiots.
 
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